4

tidyr::expand() returns all possible combinations of values from multiple columns. I'm looking for a slightly different behavior, where all the values are in a single column and the combinations are to be taken across groups.

For example, let the data be defined as follows:

library( tidyverse )
X <- bind_rows( data_frame(Group = "Group1", Value = LETTERS[1:3]),
                data_frame(Group = "Group2", Value = letters[4:5]) )

We want all combinations of values from Group1 with values from Group2. My current clunky solution is to separate the values across multiple columns

Y <- X %>% group_by(Group) %>% do(vals = .$Value) %>% spread(Group, vals)
# # A tibble: 1 x 2
#   Group1    Group2   
#   <list>    <list>   
# 1 <chr [3]> <chr [2]>

followed by a double unnest operation

Y %>% unnest( .preserve = Group2 ) %>% unnest
# # A tibble: 6 x 2
#   Group1 Group2
#   <chr>  <chr> 
# 1 A      d     
# 2 A      e     
# 3 B      d     
# 4 B      e     
# 5 C      d     
# 6 C      e     

This is the desired output, but as you can imagine, this solution doesn't generalize well: as the number of groups increases, so does the number of unnest operations that we have to perform.

Is there a more elegant solution?

  • 6
    expand.grid(split(X$Value, X$Group)) – Henrik May 25 '18 at 19:53
  • How would you expect a third case to be handled? – andrew_reece May 25 '18 at 19:58
  • Thanks, @Henrik. So simple! I ended up slapping a stringsAsFactors = FALSE on top of that expand.grid() call. If you make your comment into an actual answer, I'll be happy to accept. – Artem Sokolov May 26 '18 at 0:19
4

Because OP seems happy to use base, I upgrade my comment to an answer:

expand.grid(split(X$Value, X$Group))
#   Group1 Group2
# 1      A      d
# 2      B      d
# 3      C      d
# 4      A      e
# 5      B      e
# 6      C      e

As noted by OP, expand.grid converts character vectors to factors. To prevent that, use stringsAsFactors = FALSE.

The tidyverse equivalent is purrr::cross_df, which doesn't coerce to factor:

cross_df(split(X$Value, X$Group))
# A tibble: 6 x 2
# Group1 Group2
# <chr>  <chr> 
# 1 A      d     
# 2 B      d     
# 3 C      d     
# 4 A      e     
# 5 B      e     
# 6 C      e
3

Here is one option. It will work on the cases with more than two groups although complete_ is deprecated.

library( tidyverse )
X2 <- X %>%
  group_by(Group) %>%
  mutate(ID = 1:n()) %>%
  spread(Group, Value) %>%
  select(-ID) %>%
  complete_(names(.)) %>%
  na.omit()
X2
# # A tibble: 6 x 2
#   Group1 Group2
#   <chr>  <chr> 
# 1 A      d     
# 2 A      e     
# 3 B      d     
# 4 B      e     
# 5 C      d     
# 6 C      e 

Update

!!!syms(names(.)) works well with the regular complete function, thus is better than using complete_ as my original solution.

library( tidyverse )
X2 <- X %>%
  group_by(Group) %>%
  mutate(ID = 1:n()) %>%
  spread(Group, Value) %>%
  select(-ID) %>%
  complete(!!!syms(names(.))) %>%
  na.omit()
X2
# # A tibble: 6 x 2
#   Group1 Group2
#   <chr>  <chr> 
# 1 A      d     
# 2 A      e     
# 3 B      d     
# 4 B      e     
# 5 C      d     
# 6 C      e 
  • 1
    Thanks, www. I ended up going with Henrick's solution, but mutate(ID = 1:n()) is the key ingredient I was missing when trying to separate groups of varying lengths into individual columns! I'll have to remember the !!!syms(...) trick too. – Artem Sokolov May 26 '18 at 0:24
  • I like Henrick’s method, too. Thanks for this interesting question. – www May 26 '18 at 3:17
  • @www, I think you need to add the library(rlang) call to your second example to use the syms() function? That will help future folks trying to run it (took me a while to figure out which library I was missing). Also, what does the !!! do in front of syms()? – Russ Thomas May 26 '18 at 17:54
  • 1
    @JRT If I load tidyverse only, the code still works on my machine. It looks like syms is also a function from the dplyr package. I cannot explain !!! very well, so please see this cran.r-project.org/web/packages/dplyr/vignettes/… to learn more. – www May 26 '18 at 21:21
  • 1
    @www, updated tidyverse and that fixed my issue. – Russ Thomas May 27 '18 at 3:18
1

I often use tidyr::crossing() to join all values from group2 to group.

data_frame(group = c(LETTERS[1:3])) %>% 
  crossing(group2 = letters[4:5])

I might do something like this:

data %>% 
  distinct(group) %>% 
  crossing(group2)

A more specific example:

dates <- lubridate::make_date(2000:2018)

data_frame(group = letters[1:5]) %>% 
  crossing(dates)
1

This still works with expand after spread.

X %>%
  mutate(id = row_number()) %>%
  spread(Group, Value) %>%
  expand(Group1, Group2) %>%
  na.omit()

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