2

I am learning about lexical this being passed around and it is my understanding that a fat arrow gets its "this" from itself or the function above it. If that is a regular function my understanding is it wouldn't get this from a function higher than this. For example this is the code I believe shouldn't run:

function test() {
  this.a = 5; // test()' variable
  this.b = function() {
    //this is a fat arrow function so console log below could grab the this from this function's space, but not higher than this, but it does?
    this.c = setTimeout(() => {
      console.log(this.a);
    }, 1000);
  }
}
var d = new test();
d.b();

So I expect that the console.log statement wants to print out this.a . It doesn't exist in the fat arrow functions context so it goes up one level to the anonymous function level. There is also no this.a here. This is a regular non-fat arrow function meaning the lexical scope to my understanding should stop here, it shouldn't go up any higher, but it does and I am not sure why. Why is this happening?

  • var d = new test(); is the root execution context i believe. And lexical scope lookup eventually finds the variable a – Isaac May 26 '18 at 4:00
  • The b function is a part of/attached to test, they have the same this pointer. – Jerinaw May 26 '18 at 4:10
1

Because you're invoking the function b as d.b it's this is object d. So this.a is equivalent to d.a. As you already observe, the arrow function will carry this from its parent scope, hence it is able to resolve this.a as d.a.

function test() {

  this.a = 5; // test()' variable
  this.b = function() {
    console.log("this.a in b: ", this.a);
  
    this.c = setTimeout(() => {
      console.log("this.a in c: ", this.a);
    }, 1000);
  }
}

var d = new test();
d.b();


What happens if you pull d.b in a separate variable, and then invoke it? You get undefined - because this inside b now refers to the global scope.

function test() {

  this.a = 5; // test()' variable
  this.b = function() {
    console.log("this.a in b: ", this.a);
    console.log("this === window: ",this === window);
  
    this.c = setTimeout(() => {
      console.log("this.a in c:", this.a);
    }, 1000);
  }
}

var d = new test();
var myNewFunction = d.b;

myNewFunction();

1

read this (pun intended)

"When a function is called as a method of an object, its this is set to the object the method is called on"

Consider this simplified example:

"use strict";

var obj = {
  name: "obj",
  a: function() {
    return this
  }
}
var a = obj.a
var obj2 = {
  name: "obj2"
}
obj2.a = a

console.log(
  obj.a(), // => obj
  a(), // => window | undefined (based on strict mode)
  obj2.a() // => obj2
)

Similarly, in your example, calling d.b() will set this to d inside b. Inside your arrow function, this context will be preserved.

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