90

Is there an equivalent of list slicing [1:] from Python in C++ with vectors? I simply want to get all but the first element from a vector.

Python's list slicing operator:

list1 = [1, 2, 3]
list2 = list1[1:]  

print(list2) # [2, 3]

C++ Desired result:

std::vector<int> v1 = {1, 2, 3};
std::vector<int> v2;
v2 = v1[1:];

std::cout << v2 << std::endl;  //{2, 3}
6

7 Answers 7

144

This can easily be done using std::vector's copy constructor:

v2 = std::vector<int>(v1.begin() + 1, v1.end());
9
  • 34
    This answer could be improved mentioning whether v1.end() is included or not. Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 7:43
  • 3
    @AlessandroFlati Yes, it does. Otherwise my answer would be wrong since OP asked: "I simply want to get all but the first element from a vector" :)
    – DimChtz
    Commented Feb 7, 2021 at 20:14
  • 6
    I know it does, I just suggested to include it in the answer to make it flawless. Commented Feb 8, 2021 at 16:13
  • 21
    Just for the record, v1.end() is not the element at the end of the vector, it is the iterator that points at the (non-existent) element after the last element.
    – kirelagin
    Commented Jun 16, 2021 at 5:10
  • 1
    Is the Time Complexity O(size of sliced vector) ?
    – Prakhar
    Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 8:36
16

In C++20 it is pretty easy:

#include <span>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

template<int left = 0, int right = 0, typename T>
constexpr auto slice(T&& container)
{
    if constexpr (right > 0)
    {
        return std::span(begin(std::forward<T>(container))+left, begin(std::forward<T>(container))+right);
    }
    else
    {
        return std::span(begin(std::forward<T>(container))+left, end(std::forward<T>(container))+right);
    }
}



int main()
{
    std::vector v{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};

    std::cout << "-------------------" << std::endl;
    auto v0 = slice<1,0>(v);
    for (auto i : v0)
    {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << "-------------------" << std::endl;
    auto v1 = slice<0,-1>(v);
    for (auto i : v1)
    {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << "-------------------" << std::endl;
    auto v2 = slice<1,3>(v);
    for (auto i : v2)
    {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << "-------------------" << std::endl;
    auto v3 = slice<1,-1>(v);
    for (auto i : v3)
    {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << "-------------------" << std::endl;
    auto v4 = slice<3,3>(v);
    for (auto i : v4)
    {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

}

Result:

Program returned: 0
-------------------
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-------------------
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
-------------------
2
3
-------------------
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
-------------------

You can also add boundary checks and other cases like negative left indices etc... but this is only an example.

Run in compiler explorer: https://godbolt.org/z/qeaxvjdbj

2
  • This slice syntax is pretty cool. But why not use std::slice? Commented Oct 28, 2021 at 18:43
  • 2
    std::slice is ok, but I was trying something similar to python syntax for std::vector. As I understand std::slice does not work with std::vector. (previous comment was truncated)
    – mnesarco
    Commented Oct 29, 2021 at 1:18
14

It depends on whether you want a view or a copy.

Python's slicing for lists copies references to the elements, so it cannot be simply regarded as a view or a copy. For example,

list1 = [1, 2, 3]
list2 = list1[1:]  
list2[1] = 5
print(list1) # does not change, still [1, 2, 3]
list1 = [1, 2, [3]]
list2 = list1[1:]  
list2[1][0] = 5
print(list1) # changes, becomes [1, 2, [5]]

See this post for details.

DimChtz's anwer models the copy situation. If you just want a view, in C++20, you can use ranges (besides std::views::drop, std::views::take and std::views::counted are also useful):

auto v2 = v1 | std::views::drop(1); // #include <ranges>
for (auto &e: v2) std::cout << e << '\n';  

or std::span:

std::span v2{v1.begin() + 1, v1.end()}; // #include <span>
for (auto &e: v2) std::cout << e << '\n';  
1
  • One can also use std::span::subspan() with span. It doesn’t support negative index, though. Commented Sep 8, 2022 at 6:18
8

I know it's late but have a look at valarray and its slices. If you are using a vector of some sort of NumericType, then it's worth giving it a try.

1
2

You can follow the above answer. It's always better to know multiple ways.

int main
{
    std::vector<int> v1 = {1, 2, 3};
    std::vector<int> v2{v1};
    v2.erase( v2.begin() );
    return 0;
}
2
  • I would say this way of doing it is inefficient compared with the solution above, since erase will delete the first element and then relocate all the others. So then you first perform a copy of N elements, then delete one, then move N-1. Commented Oct 12, 2021 at 16:31
  • I never said it is efficient. I shared this as another way of doing it.
    – Ananth
    Commented Oct 13, 2021 at 1:20
0

To find a sub vector from index a to b, then, simply do this:

vector<int> sub_vec(v.begin() + a, v.begin() + b + 1);

This will create a Sub Vector from the a index to the b index and we also add 1 in the end of the range while slicing as because end index will be excluded (value b-1 will be taken as the last index). So, we add 1 to include our last index also.

-1

It seems that the cheapest way is to use pointer to the starting element and the number of elements in the slice. It would not be a real vector but it will be good enough for many uses.

1
  • The idea is reasonable, but C++ already has this packaged as std::span. xskxzr added an answer showing how to use it.
    – MSalters
    Commented Nov 15, 2022 at 13:42

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