3

How do you update the state of a sibling widget in Flutter?

For example, if I have a rectangle widget, I can change its color from within the widget by calling setState() and changing the color variable (as the "Turn Green" button does below). But, say I wanted a button outside of the rectangle that would change its color. How do I communicate to the Rectangle that it's time to change its color, and what color to change to?

Here is my sample code. When the user presses the "Turn Blue" button, I'd like the rectangle to turn blue, but I don't have access to its state from the sibling widget.

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(
    MaterialApp(
      debugShowCheckedModeBanner: false,
      title: 'Hello Rectangle',
      home: Scaffold(
        appBar: AppBar(
          title: Text('Hello Rectangle'),
        ),
        body: Column(
          children: <Widget>[
            HelloRectangle(),
            FlatButton(
            child: Text('Turn Blue!',
              style: TextStyle(fontSize: 40.0),
              textAlign: TextAlign.center,
            ),
            onPressed: () {
              // How to update state of the Rectangle from here?
            },
          ),
          ]
        ),
      ),
    ),
  );
}

class HelloRectangle extends StatefulWidget {
  @override
  HelloRectangleState createState() {
    return new HelloRectangleState();
  }
}

class HelloRectangleState extends State<HelloRectangle> {
  Color _color;

  @override
    void initState() {
      super.initState();
      _color = Colors.red;
    }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Center(
      child: Container(
        color: _color,
        height: 400.0,
        width: 300.0,
        child: Center(
          child: FlatButton(
            child: Text('Turn Green!',
              style: TextStyle(fontSize: 40.0),
              textAlign: TextAlign.center,
            ),
            onPressed: () {
              // I can update the state from here because I'm inside the widget
              setState(() {
               _color = Colors.green;
              });
             },
          ),
        ),
      ),
    );
  }
}
5

The rule of thumb is that you can't access the state of any Widget that isn't above you in the hierarchy. So, basically we need to move the state (color) up to an ancestor. Introduce a StatefulWidget that builds the Scaffold or Column and store the rectangle color there. Now the rectangle widget no longer needs to store the color, so can become a stateless widget - and you can pass the color in through the constructor. Both onPressed callbacks can now call a method on the new StatefulWidget which calls setState. (You could pass that method down to the rectangle widget, amongst other ways.)

There are two good introductions to best practise here and here.

  • Tree beat me to it, but you can see that we proposed the same thing. Tree could also make HelloRectangle a StatelessWidget. This Widget will get rebuilt whenever the ancestor state changes (with the new color). Check out the two videos when you get the chance as they will help with your other recent question. – Richard Heap May 28 '18 at 1:19
3

Here is basic example how to do it from outside.

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(
    new MyApp(),
  );
}

class MyApp extends StatefulWidget {
  const MyApp({
    Key key,
  }) : super(key: key);

  @override
  MyAppState createState() {
    return new MyAppState();
  }
}

class MyAppState extends State<MyApp> {
  MaterialColor _color = Colors.green;

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      debugShowCheckedModeBanner: false,
      title: 'Hello Rectangle',
      home: Scaffold(
        appBar: AppBar(
          title: Text('Hello Rectangle'),
        ),
        body: Column(children: <Widget>[
          HelloRectangle(_color),
          FlatButton(
            child: Text(
              _color == Colors.green ? "Turn Blue" : "Turn Green",
              style: TextStyle(fontSize: 40.0),
              textAlign: TextAlign.center,
            ),
            onPressed: () {
              setState(() {
                _color = _color == Colors.green ? Colors.blue : Colors.green;
              });
            },
          ),
        ]),
      ),
    );
  }
}

class HelloRectangle extends StatefulWidget {
  final Color color;

  HelloRectangle(this.color);

  @override
  HelloRectangleState createState() {
    return new HelloRectangleState();
  }
}

class HelloRectangleState extends State<HelloRectangle> {
  HelloRectangleState();

  @override
  void initState() {
    super.initState();
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Center(
      child: Container(
        color: widget.color,
        height: 400.0,
        width: 300.0,
      ),
    );
  }
}
  • 1
    Thank you for the code. It was helpful in understanding, but I accepted Richard's answer because it included the explanation of lifting the state up to an ancestor (as you did in your code). – Mike Miller May 27 '18 at 19:47

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