This program creates a thread to read a directory with dir() and place the files on a channel. $N worker threads read that channel and "process" (prints) the files.

However I'm getting this "An operation first awaited:" error.

I've read the traps page about this error several times, but still can't make sense of it. Can some explain what's going on here?

The directory contents:

$ ls
a  b  c  traverse-dir0.p6

Running the program:

$ ./traverse-dir0.p6 
traverse-dir0.p6
a
b
c
An operation first awaited:
  in sub MAIN at ./traverse-dir0.p6 line 24
  in block  at ./traverse-dir0.p6 line 5

Died with the exception:
    Cannot find method 'path': no method cache and no .^find_method
      in block  at ./traverse-dir0.p6 line 16

The program traverse-dir0.p6:

#!/usr/bin/env perl6
# There is a thread to populate $dir-channel by reading filenames in a directory with dir()
# and $N worker threads to read the filenames from the $dir-channel.

sub MAIN( Str $dir = ".", Int :$N = 4 ) {

    my $dir-channel = Channel.new();
    my $dir-read = start {
        $dir-channel.send( $_ ) for dir $dir;
        $dir-channel.close;
    }

    my @workers = (^$N).map: {
        start {
            while my $file = $dir-channel.receive() {
                say $file.path;
            }
            CATCH {
                when X::Channel::ReceiveOnClosed { .resume }
            }
        }
    }

    await $dir-read, @workers;
}
  • 1
    The underlying error is Cannot find method 'path': no method cache and no .^find_method. Fix that error and see what happens – Bob Dalgleish May 28 at 21:33
  • 1
    Why are you so focused on "An operation first awaited" (which is just a sentence fragment, the full sentence is "An operation (that was first awaited in [location]) died with the exception:")? The error is Cannot find method 'path'. – melpomene May 28 at 21:34
  • In hindsight I could have phased the question better. However I'm more interesting in how the flow control got to the "Cannot find method 'path'", that is the <pre>say $file.path;</pre> line. Why did it .resume inside the <pre>while my $file = $dir-channel.receive()</pre> loop – Norman Gaywood May 28 at 22:33
up vote 8 down vote accepted

First, about the output from an exception thrown from an await. There are two interesting pieces of information when an asynchronous operation fails:

  • Where in the program we wanted the result of the operation
  • Where in the program the problem occurred that meant the operation could not be performed

The first piece of information is indicating the location of the await, and the stack trace relates to that. The second part is about why the exception was re-thrown by the await, and indicates the problem that needs to be fixed.

The problem in this case is that the path method is called on an object that doesn't have one. This is thanks to the .resume, which makes no sense. The exception is thrown to say that it was not possible to receive a value from the channel. Resuming it just means the loop body runs with an undefined value in $file, which lacks a path method and leads to the error. (As an aside: it's very, very rare that .resume is the right answer.)

The smallest fix to the code is to replace the .resume with a last, which terminates the iteration when the channel is closed:

my @workers = (^$N).map: {
    start {
        while my $file = $dir-channel.receive() {
            say $file.path;
            CATCH {
                when X::Channel::ReceiveOnClosed { last }
            }
        }
    }
}

However, it's far simpler to coerce the Channel into an iterable Seq. This automatically handles terminating the iteration when the Channel is closed, so there's no messing around with exceptions:

my @workers = (^$N).map: {
    start {
        for $dir-channel.Seq -> $file {
            say $file.path;
        }
    }
}

And since start is a statement prefix, that further shortens to:

my @workers = (^$N).map: {
    start for $dir-channel.Seq -> $file {
        say $file.path;
    }   
}   

I appreciate this was probably a simplified version of a more interesting problem, or perhaps done to explore various Perl 6 concurrency concepts, but the whole lot could be replaced with:

sub MAIN( Str $dir = ".", Int :$N = 4 ) {
    race for dir($dir).race(batch => 1, degree => $N) -> $file {
        say $file.path;
    }
}

Which has the same semantics, but saves starting and managing the workers, while still controlling the number of workers and making sure the files are distributed in the same way among the workers.

  • Very nice simplifications, thanks! My main issue I was having was not understanding .resume and where the flow control resumed to. – Norman Gaywood May 29 at 2:19
  • It resumes to the place that threw the exception - in this case, somewhere inside of the Channel implementation. – Jonathan Worthington May 29 at 10:20
  • Another fix for the original seems to be to leave out the .resume. That is: when X::Channel::ReceiveOnClosed {}. This would be the behavior I expecting from .resume, that control would return back to $dir-channel.receive() as a Failure and hence exiting the while. Anyway, the solutions provided are much nicer to work with. – Norman Gaywood May 29 at 23:21

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