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I want to use a template literal, i.e. backticks, to insert elements from an array into my HTML. Essentially, I want to create my own extremely simple templating system.

I expected forEach to work, with each iterated callback just inserting the returned text. However, it just returns undefined, e.g.:

const myArray = ['square', 'triangle', 'circle'];
document.querySelector('div').innerHTML = `
  <p>Some shapes:<\p>
  <ul>
    ${myArray.forEach(elmt => `
      <li>${elmt}</li>
    `)}
  </ul>
`;
<div></div>

So, how do I do this?

1 Answer 1

6

Use myArray.map(...).join('') instead of myArray.forEach(...).

In a template literal, the results of code within a placeholder, i.e. within ${...}, are coerced to a string before insertion. A forEach(...) loop only returns undefined by definition. In contrast, map(...) returns a use-able value, i.e. an array. However, when the array is co-erced to a string, by default commas are inserted between elements. This results in unwanted text nodes, each containing a comma, appearing between the intended insertions. However, this default can be changed by explicitly joining the array elements with an empty string using .join(''):

const myArray = ['square', 'triangle', 'circle'];
document.querySelector('div').innerHTML = `
  <p>Some shapes:<\p>
  <ul>
    ${myArray.map(elmt => `
      <li>${elmt}</li>
    `).join('')}
  </ul>
`;
<div></div>

Note that this strategy can easily be used with other iterables by first simply coercing them to an array, e.g. by using [...mySet].map... instead of myArray.map..., etc.

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