3

I have two files:

int PolyMod(int s);
void CreateChecksum(int isTestNet, int *mod) {
    *mod = PolyMod(isTestNet == 0 ? 5 : 9);
}

and

int PolyMod(int s);
void CreateChecksum(int isTestNet, int *mod) {
    if (isTestNet == 0) {
        *mod = PolyMod(5);
    } else {
        *mod = PolyMod(9);
    }
}

Somehow their assembly result is different. Why? You can see the assembly created from the first file here and from the second file here.

Doesn't the compiler know that they're equivalent, and one is faster? Was the reason they had different assemblies was that they're exactly equally fast, and the only difference between them was the order of operations?

I've wondered if the difference was caused by static branch prediction. After experimenting with __builtin_expect, I believe that the answer is no.

  • 2
    The difference is due to the code skeleton used by the compiler for the different constructs, try the second using the optimizations (see godbolt.org/g/9VcAfp), and you'll find an even shorter code. – Frankie_C May 29 '18 at 11:25
  • 1
    The code is different. A ternary operator is not the same as an if statement.Therefore optimizations are applied in different ways/orders. Expecting an identical result doesn't seem to be reasonable. – Gerhardh May 29 '18 at 11:25
  • 1
    Which optimization options do you pass to the compiler? – marcolz May 29 '18 at 11:44
  • 1
    The equivalent if-else version would rather be: int param; if(isTestNet == 0) { param = 5; } else { param = 9; } *mod = PolyMod(param). Sure, logically it is the same thing, but the compiler might not necessarily think the same way as humans do. – Lundin May 29 '18 at 11:46
  • 1
    Compilers are stupider than most people expect, and miss a lot of optimization opportunities. Though in this case, clang does generate the same branchless assembly code for both versions. – interjay May 29 '18 at 11:47
3

It seems that the problem is a missed optimization bug, caused by GIMPLE in GCC. Clang doesn't have this bug, so it generates the same assembly.

I've reported this to GCC; the bug can be tracked here: https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=85971

  • Don't forget that you can accept your own answer two days after posting the question. – Mawg May 29 '18 at 12:22
1

C does not impose any restriction about what instructions to generate in hardware.

It is allowed to generate any possible instruction as time as the semantics of the generated code remains the same as the abstract semantics of C (defined in ISO 9899).

The compiler will transform the C code in many intermediate languages(combinators, rtl, ssa, generic, gimple, etc etc), in particular in RTL and from there there is generated hardware dependent code.

You should study the intermediate languages in order to understand why the generated assembler is different.

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