can this be done somehow?

if((a || b) == 0) return 1;
return 0;

so its like...if a OR b equals zero, then...but it is not working for me. my real code is:

bool Circle2::contains(Line2 l) {
    if((p1.distanceFrom(l.p1) || p1.distanceFrom(l.p2)) <= r) {
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}
  • 9
    As a side-note your code formatting in the second one is horrible. It's easy to miss the return 1; and think that return 0; is the "then" clause, and not the implicit "else" clause. – CodesInChaos Feb 20 '11 at 17:30
  • 4
    Please use return true or return false. Yes, I'm aware that compilers will correctly interpret this, but... if you're going to declare bool, at least use the bool keywords. – Randolpho Feb 20 '11 at 17:30
  • @codeinchaos, i didn't even see the return 1 ! – Marlon Feb 20 '11 at 17:35
  • You are looking for the ICON programming language, not C++; it's a language where you can write things like if (i|j|k) == (10|20) with the meaning "either i, j or k are equal to 10 or 20" ... cs.arizona.edu/icon – 6502 Feb 20 '11 at 18:06
  • A good question on the basics, because the compiler will accept these fragments and then do something that a beginner may find surprising. – dmckee Feb 20 '11 at 18:43
up vote 15 down vote accepted

You need to write the full expression:

(a==0)||(b==0)

And in the second code:

if((p1.distanceFrom(l.p1)<= r) || (p1.distanceFrom(l.p2)<=r) )
    return 1;

If you do ((a || b) == 0) this means "Is the logical or of a and b equal to 0. And that's not what you want here.

And as a side note: the if (BooleanExpression)return true; else return false pattern can be shortened to return BooleanExpression;

  • LOL, it's a stampede! +1 for your mad speed-answering skills. – Jim Lewis Feb 20 '11 at 17:32

You have to specify the condition separately each time:

if (a == 0) || (b == 0))
    bla bla;

When you do

if ((a || b) == 0)
    bla bla;

it has a different meaning: (a || b) means "if either a or b is non-zero (ie. true), then the result of this expression is true". So when you do (a||b) == 0, you are checking if the result of the previously explained expression is equal to zero (or false).

The C++ language specifies that the operands of || ("or") be boolean expressions.

If p1.distanceFrom(l.p1) is not boolean (that is, if distanceFrom returns int, or double, or some numeric class type), the compiler will attempt to convert it to boolean.

For built in numeric type, the conversion is: non-zero converts to true, zero converts to false. If the type of p1.distanceFrom(l.p1) is of class type Foo, the compiler will call one (and only one) user defined conversion, e.g., Foo::operator bool(), to convert the expression's value to bool.

I think you really want something like this:

bool Circle2::contains(Line2 l) {
if((p1.distanceFrom(l.p1) <= r) || (p1.distanceFrom(l.p2) <= r)) return 1;
    return 0;
}

Fun with templates:

template <typename T>
struct or_t
{
  or_t(const T& a, const T& b) : value1(a), value2(b)
  {
  }

  bool operator==(const T& c)
  {
    return value1 == c || value2 == c;
  }

private:
  const T& value1;
  const T& value2;
};

template <typename T>
or_t<T> or(const T& a, const T& b)
{
  return or_t<T>(a, b);
}

In use:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  int a = 7;
  int b = 9;

  if (or(a, b) == 7)
  {
  }

  return 0;
}

It performs the same comparison you would normally do, though, but at your convenience.

  • And now go for short-circuit version... ;-) – 6502 Feb 20 '11 at 18:01

If you have lot of that code, you may consider a helping method:

bool distanceLE (Point p1, Point p2, double threshold) {
    return (p1.distanceFrom (p2) <= threshold)
}

bool Circle2::contains (Line2 l) {
    return distanceLE (p1, l.p1, r) && distanceLE (p1, l.p2, r);
}

If you sometimes have <, sometimes <=, >, >= and so on, maybe you should pass the operator too, in form of a function.

In some cases your intentions by writing this:

if ((a || b) == 0) return 1;
return 0;

could be expressed with an bitwise-or:

if ((a | b) == 0) return 1;
return 0;

and simplified to

return  ! (a | b);

But read up on bitwise operations and test it carefully. I use them rarely and especially I didn't use C++ for some time.

Note, that you inverted the meaning between your examples 1 and 2, returning true and false in the opposite way.

And bitwise less-equal doesn't make any sense, of course. :)

C++ doesn't support any construct like that. Use if (a == 0 || b == 0).

  • 2
    It does, but they have different meaning. – Nikita Rybak Feb 20 '11 at 17:28
  • 1
    @NikitaRybak: I meant semantically. (a || b) == 0 will be true if both a and b are false. – Cat Plus Plus Feb 20 '11 at 17:31
  • yeah im looking for function as in discrete mathematics, so (a || b) == 0 would be true if both are true and false if atleast 1 is false – Jaanus Feb 20 '11 at 17:36

Your condition should be (a == 0 || b == 0) or (p1.distanceFrom(l.p1) <= r || p1.distanceFrom(l.p2)) <= r)

C++ isn't that smart. You have to do each comparison manually.

bool Circle2::contains(Line2 l) {
if((p1.distanceFrom(l.p1) <= r) || (p1.distanceFrom(l.p2) <= r)) return 1;
    return 0;
}

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