-2
cleanedList = [x for x in range(0, 100, 1)]   
idx = 0

for val in cleanedList:     
   check = abs(cleanedList[idx])
   idx = idx + 1

   if check % 5 == 0: #####  Conditions changed and change the list

       cleanedList = a new list that loops over.

This is arbitrary example. I want to change the list it is looping now when the conditions fails. I tried this way. I don't think it actually changed the list it is looping now. Please correct me.

  • 1
    What makes you think it did't change the list? – Scott Hunter May 29 '18 at 23:58
  • 2
    @ScottHunter - what makes you think it did? – tdelaney May 29 '18 at 23:59
  • @tdelaney: Running it – Scott Hunter May 30 '18 at 0:02
  • 2
    You aren't changing the list you're iterating over. Instead, you're taking the name you were using to refer to that list and changing its meaning to something else. Actually changing the list would look like cleanedList[:] = [x for x in range(60,100,2)]. Note that this is usually a bad idea. It's very unlikely that the best solution to your problem requires – Patrick Haugh May 30 '18 at 0:06
  • 1
    I'm struggling to see what you want the outcome to be. Do you want the entire list replaced if check mod 5 is zero, and then just break out of the loop? Do you want to keep appending the new list to the end --- and have an infinite loop? Can you give an example of, say, 10 elements and what the expected result is. – tdelaney May 30 '18 at 0:23
0

It is not advisable to change the list over which you are looping. However, if this is what you really want, then you could do it this way:

cleanedList = list(range(0, 100, 1))   
for i, _ in enumerate(cleanedList):     
   check = abs(cleanedList[i])
   if check % 5 == 0: #####  Change the list it is looping now
       cleanedList[:] = range(60, 100, 2)
  • Why go to all that trouble instead of just cleanedList[:] = range(60, 100, 2)? – abarnert May 30 '18 at 1:30
  • @abarnert Yep, you are right. My bad. Fixed. Thanks! Still a non-sense algorithm, unfortunately. – AGN Gazer May 30 '18 at 1:36
  • Thanks for the help. I think this example is very arbitrary and I use this example to make my question more concrete and intentionally use not a non-sense algorithm. The main question I want to ask is changing the list I am looping if the condition fails – Tom May 30 '18 at 16:57
  • @Tom Well, does my answer show how to change a list while looping over it? – AGN Gazer May 30 '18 at 17:42
  • @AGNGazer Yes it did. Sorry for being rude. – Tom May 31 '18 at 18:52
0

This is an interesting one, because you haven't actually mutated the list.

cleanedList = [x for x in range(0, 100, 1)]  # Creates list1
idx = 0

for val in cleanedList:  # begin iterating list1.  It's stored internally here.
   check = abs(cleanedList[idx])
   print val, check, 
   idx = idx + 1
   if check < 30: #####  Change the list it is looping now
       cleanedList = [x for x in range(60,100,2)]  # reassign here, but it becomes list2.

The output tells the story:

0 0 1 62 2 64 3 66 4 68 5 70 6 72 7 74 8 76 9 78 10 80 11 82 12 84 13 86 14 88 15 90 16 92 17 94 18 96 19 98

Because you didn't mutate, you reassigned, the dangling reference to the list you're iterating over initially still exists for the context of the for loop, and it continues way past the end of list 2, which is why you eventually throw IndexError - there are 100 items in your first list, and only 20 in your second list.

  • 2
    Python list iterators don't throw any exceptions when you mutate the list, AFAIK. dict and set iterators will, though. – juanpa.arrivillaga May 30 '18 at 0:09
  • Yeah ... just double-checked that. You are correct. – g.d.d.c May 30 '18 at 0:10
  • Thanks for the help. I think this example is fairly arbitrary. I think the main question I want to ask is changing the list I am looping if the condition fails. – Tom May 30 '18 at 16:54
0

Very briefly, when you want to edit a list you're iterating over, you should use a copy of the list. so your code simply transfers to:

for val in cleanedList[:]:

and you can have all kinds of edits on your original cleanedList and no error will show up.

  • What does cleanedList[:] do here? It just changes everything in the list? – Tom May 31 '18 at 16:24

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