14

Background

I have signed a file using openssl SHA256 and a private key as follows:

with subprocess.Popen(
        # Pipe the signature to openssl to convert it from raw binary encoding to base64 encoding.
        # This will prevent any potential corruption due to line ending conversions, and also allows 
        # a human to read and copy the signature (e.g. for manual verification).
        'openssl dgst -sha256 -sign private.key sign_me.zip | openssl base64 > signature.sha256',
        stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
        stderr=subprocess.STDOUT,
        shell=True,
) as proc:
    out, _ = proc.communicate()

Requirements

  1. I need to use signature.sha256 and public_key.crt to verify that sign_me.zip has not been modified.
  2. Compatible with Python 3.2 - 3.4
  3. Needs to work on both Windows and Redhat, and there is no guarantee that OpenSSL will be on the path or in a known location. Ideally I'd like to use a core Python module, but I will consider a 3rd party module if it reduces complexity.

What I've Tried

I've done a lot of searching trying to figure out how to do this, but I haven't been able to find a satisfactory answer. Here is a list of things I've tried and/or researched:

  • I am able to manually verify the signature via the following shell command. This won't work as a permanent solution due to requirement 3.

    openssl dgst -sha256 -verify <(openssl x509 -in public_key.crt -pubkey -noout) -signature signature.sha256 sign_me.zip

  • I found this question, which is almost exactly what I want to do. It hasn't been answered or even commented on in nearly 2 years. It mentions the ssl python library, which deals mostly with client/server certificates and sockets.

  • This question appears to use the crypto library to verify a "SHA256withRSA and PKCS1 padding" signature. Unfortunately it targets Python 2.7, and additionally I wasn't able to locate the verify() method documentation in the Python 2.7 crypto module that the question references.
  • I also discovered a 3rd party module called cryptography. Consensus on Stack Overflow seems to be that this is the latest/greatest module for encryption and such, but I wasn't able to find documentation that matched my requirements.

Perhaps I'm missing something obvious? I haven't done much work with security/encryption/hashing, so feedback is welcome.

4
  • 2
    Have a look at the "Verification" section of cryptography.io/en/latest/hazmat/primitives/asymmetric/rsa . Or other cases under "Asymmetric algorithms". You will need some plumbing to construct the appropriate objects out of strings/files before being able to use verify(). May 30, 2018 at 15:23
  • Here is another option: gist.github.com/lkdocs/6519372 May 30, 2018 at 15:32
  • 1
    And you should generate the signature with the same tools you will use to verify it, if you want to reduce errors and interoperability problems. May 30, 2018 at 15:36
  • The core Python modules rely on OpenSSL libs (OpenSSL must be installed on the system in order to work). For Win, the OpenSSL libs are statically linked inside the Python modules. I tend to think that things are the same for other 3rd Party modules.
    – CristiFati
    May 31, 2018 at 14:21

1 Answer 1

29

Thanks to Patrick Mevzek for pointing me in the right direction. I eventually found the following solution to my problem using the Cryptography module. I ended up changing how I'm signing the file to match how I will later verify it.

Key Generation:

from cryptography.hazmat.backends import default_backend
from cryptography.hazmat.primitives import serialization
from cryptography.hazmat.primitives.asymmetric import rsa

# Generate the public/private key pair.
private_key = rsa.generate_private_key(
    public_exponent = 65537,
    key_size = 4096,
    backend = default_backend(),
)

# Save the private key to a file.
with open('private.key', 'wb') as f:
    f.write(
        private_key.private_bytes(
            encoding=serialization.Encoding.PEM,
            format=serialization.PrivateFormat.TraditionalOpenSSL,
            encryption_algorithm=serialization.NoEncryption(),
        )
    )

# Save the public key to a file.
with open('public.pem', 'wb') as f:
    f.write(
        private_key.public_key().public_bytes(
            encoding = serialization.Encoding.PEM,
            format = serialization.PublicFormat.SubjectPublicKeyInfo,
        )
    )

Signing:

import base64
from cryptography.hazmat.backends import default_backend
from cryptography.hazmat.primitives import hashes
from cryptography.hazmat.primitives import serialization
from cryptography.hazmat.primitives.asymmetric import padding

# Load the private key. 
with open('private.key', 'rb') as key_file: 
    private_key = serialization.load_pem_private_key(
        key_file.read(),
        password = None,
        backend = default_backend(),
    )

# Load the contents of the file to be signed.
with open('payload.dat', 'rb') as f:
    payload = f.read()

# Sign the payload file.
signature = base64.b64encode(
    private_key.sign(
        payload,
        padding.PSS(
            mgf = padding.MGF1(hashes.SHA256()),
            salt_length = padding.PSS.MAX_LENGTH,
        ),
        hashes.SHA256(),
    )
)
with open('signature.sig', 'wb') as f:
    f.write(signature)

Verification:

import base64
import cryptography.exceptions
from cryptography.hazmat.backends import default_backend
from cryptography.hazmat.primitives import hashes
from cryptography.hazmat.primitives.asymmetric import padding
from cryptography.hazmat.primitives.serialization import load_pem_public_key

# Load the public key.
with open('public.pem', 'rb') as f:
    public_key = load_pem_public_key(f.read(), default_backend())

# Load the payload contents and the signature.
with open('payload.dat', 'rb') as f:
    payload_contents = f.read()
with open('signature.sig', 'rb') as f:
    signature = base64.b64decode(f.read())

# Perform the verification.
try:
    public_key.verify(
        signature,
        payload_contents,
        padding.PSS(
            mgf = padding.MGF1(hashes.SHA256()),
            salt_length = padding.PSS.MAX_LENGTH,
        ),
        hashes.SHA256(),
    )
except cryptography.exceptions.InvalidSignature as e:
    print('ERROR: Payload and/or signature files failed verification!')
3
  • 1
    If verifying X.509 certificates, use padding.PKCS1v15() instead. Mar 7, 2020 at 20:39
  • 1
    Thank you @ErikusMaximus and ErikusMaximus for the help! No one else has this online!
    – Jacob Glik
    Dec 8, 2021 at 1:01
  • 1
    Tremendous work. In my application, I had access to an X509 public certificate, so I had to do the following to get the public key: from cryptography.x509 import load_pem_x509_certificate; cert = load_pem_x509_certificate(public_cert, default_backend()); public_key = cert.public_key() Dec 3, 2023 at 21:20

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