2

I'm a very perl beginner, but I have (more or less) this code:

package Base;

sub foo{
  my ($self, $first, $second, $third) = @_;
  # do some magic here!
} 

package Subclass;
use base qw(Base);

sub foo{
  my ($self, $first, $second, $third) = @_;
  #do something with $first only
  return $self->SUPER::foo($first, $second, $third);
}

And the method is called with: $self->foo("Hey", "what's", "up");

Is there a more concise way to call SUPER::foo(), without repeating the list of all args again?

  • 3
    shift->SUPER::foo(@_) Consider parent instead of base as former is recommended for inheritance. – Сухой27 May 31 '18 at 15:48
  • 1
    @Сухой27, That relies on undefined operand evaluation order. That said, many people rely on this as well, so it's unlikely to change – ikegami May 31 '18 at 19:02
5

you can re-use @_ to pass the arguments like this

$self->SUPER::foo(@_);

Since the first element of @_ is the "object" used to call the class method, you don't want to pass that into the parent class method twice, so you should use shift to remove it first.

sub foo{
  my $self=shift;
  my ($first, $second, $third) = @_;
  #do something with $first only
  return $self->SUPER::foo(@_);
}
  • Since @justHelloWorld asked for conciseness, we can do something with $first only like this: $_[0] = 'new_first' This is after $self has already been shifted in the line before... – Georgy Vladimirov Jun 5 '18 at 0:35
0

This might actually be one of the valid uses of the &function; call.

E.g.

&SUPER::foo;

As documented in perlsub - this makes @_ visible to the called sub.

It should be used with care, because it's deviating from what you might normally expect to happen - it's not passing args, it's making the same set 'visible'.

  • 3
    &SUPER::foo doesn't work as you expect. Because it's not a method call, SUPER isn't special, so this calls sub foo in package SUPER. The class's parent is not consulted. You'd have to use &Base::foo. – ikegami May 31 '18 at 20:02

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