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I am writing a simple REST API in go using gin. I have read many posts and texts about making error handling less repetitive in go, but I cannot seem to wrap my mind around how to do it in gin handlers.

All my service does is run some queries against a database and return the results as JSON, so a typical handler looks like this

func DeleteAPI(c *gin.Context) {
    var db = c.MustGet("db").(*sql.DB)
    query := "DELETE FROM table WHERE some condition"
    tx, err := db.Begin()
    if err != nil {
        c.JSON(400, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
        return
    }
    defer tx.Rollback()
    result, err := tx.Exec(query)
    if err != nil {
        c.JSON(400, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
        return
    }
    num, err := result.RowsAffected()
    if err != nil {
        c.JSON(400, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
        return
    }
    err = tx.Commit()
    if err != nil {
        c.JSON(400, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
        return
    }
    c.JSON(200, gin.H{"deleted": num})
}

As you can see, even this simple handler repeats the same "if err != nil" pattern four times. In a "select" based APIs I have twice as many, since there are potential errors when binding the input data and errors when marshaling the response into JSON. Is there a good way to make this more DRY?

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    This is by design. Go is verbose. You can extract the logic like Adrian did, but there isn't a magic construct to avoid if err != nil – Aurelia May 31 '18 at 16:24
  • There seems to be a lot of suggestions floating around about using the interface nature of golang errors and manage error handling of web services in middleware, but I am not sure how to apply these to gin. – Mad Wombat May 31 '18 at 16:27
  • There's not really a good way to handle errors in middleware. The handler doesn't get to return an error, so the only way to do this would be panic/recover, which is a terrible way to handle errors like this. – Adrian May 31 '18 at 16:40
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    I kinda wonder why panic/recover is frowned upon in the go community. What is the reason not to use it? – Mad Wombat May 31 '18 at 16:43
  • @MadWombat: Read this. But TL;DR; exceptions-as-errors (or panic in Go) were a work-around for obsolete language limitations, which don't apply to Go (or many other modern languages). – Flimzy May 31 '18 at 16:44
4

You can make it slightly more DRY with a helper:

func handleError(c *gin.Context, err error) bool {
    if err != nil {
        c.JSON(400, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
        return true
    }
    return false
}

Used as:

err = tx.Commit()
if handleError(c,err) {
    return
}

This only cuts the error handling line count from 4 lines to 3, but it does abstract away the repeated logic, allowing you to change the repeated error handling in one place instead of everywhere an error is handled (e.g. if you want to add error logging, or change the error response, etc.)

|improve this answer|||||
  • This is a bit better, although I would still prefer something more DRY. I will mark your answer if nothing better comes up. – Mad Wombat May 31 '18 at 16:29
  • Unfortunately idiomatic Go includes the pattern of checking errors for each call which might return an error. – Adrian May 31 '18 at 16:30
5

My normal approach is to use a wrapping function. This has the advantage (over Adrian's answer--which is also a good one, BTW) of leaving the error handling in a more Go-idiomatic form (of return result, err, as opposed to littering your code with handleError(err) type calls), while still consolidating it to one location.

func DeleteAPI(c *gin.Context) {
    num, err := deleteAPI(c)
    if err != nil {
        c.JSON(400, gin.H{"error": err.Error()})
        return
    }
    c.JSON(200, gin.H{"deleted": num})
}

func deleteAPI(c *gin.Context) (int, error) {
    var db = c.MustGet("db").(*sql.DB)
    query := "DELETE FROM table WHERE some condition"
    tx, err := db.Begin()
    if err != nil {
        return 0, err
    }
    defer tx.Rollback()
    result, err := tx.Exec(query)
    if err != nil {
        return 0, err
    }
    num, err := result.RowsAffected()
    if err != nil {
        return 0, err
    }
    err = tx.Commit()
    if err != nil {
        return 0, err
    }
    return num, nil
}

For me (and generally, for Go coders), the priority is code readability over DRY. And of the three options (your original, Adrian's, and mine), in my opinion, my version is more readable, for the simple reason that errors are handled in an entirely idiomatic way, and they bubble to the top handler. This same approach works equally as well if your controller ends up calling other functions that return errors. By moving all error handling to the topmost function, you're free from error-handling clutter (other than the simple 'if err != nil { return err }` construct) throughout all the rest of your code.

It's also worth noting that this approach can be powerfuly combined with Adrian's, especially for use with multiple handlers, by changing the "wrapping" function as so:

func DeleteAPI(c *gin.Context) {
    result, err := deleteAPI(c)
    if handleError(c, err) {
        return
    }
    c.JSON(200, gin.H{"deleted": num})
}
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  • This is a good pattern for this particular case, I was aiming for something more generic to "a handler that has to deal with lots of potential errors". I would say, given that deleteAPI is now effectively a database handler, it should just take the sql.DB as a parameter rather than having a dependency on gin. That way it could be moved to a DBAL package that doesn't need to deal with gin at all, just the database. – Adrian May 31 '18 at 16:35
  • @Adrian: I think your handler approach is very powerful--I often use it, and often in conjunction with this one. I've updated my answer now to include the combination as an option. – Flimzy May 31 '18 at 16:35
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    Yes, I tend to use both - an HTTP handler that uses an error helper, which calls out to a DBAL which consolidates multiple possible DB errors into a single return value. I also sometimes use another error helper within the DBAL that converts DB-specific errors into internal errors so that the HTTP layer doesn't need to know about DB-specific error types. – Adrian May 31 '18 at 16:39
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    And don't optimize for people who forget to check errors. Such people deserve the problems they get :) (But seriously... it's a TERRIBLE idea to write your code to accommodate people who are expressly writing bad code. And not checking errors is one of the worst things any Go coder can do.) – Flimzy May 31 '18 at 17:17
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    @MadWombat there's plenty of Go code, including in the standard lib, that together with an error also returns a non-nilable value (the ubiquitous Read/Write methods come to mind). There is nothing bad or fragile about returning a non-nilable value alongside an error. What doesn't only seem to be, but actually is bad, is other Go programmers not checking errors. – mkopriva May 31 '18 at 19:00

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