11

I have a generic method which is to return an object of the generic type. Some code:

public static T Foo<T>(string value)
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(String))
        return value;

    if (typeof(T) == typeof(int))
        return Int32.Parse(value);

    // Do more stuff
}

I can see that the compiler might complain about this ("Cannot convert type 'String' to 'T'"), even if the code shouldn't cause any logical errors runtime. Is there any way to achieve what I'm looking for? Casting doesn't help...

19

Well, you can do this:

public static T Foo<T>(string value)
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(String))
        return (T) (object) value;

    if (typeof(T) == typeof(int))
        return (T) (object) Int32.Parse(value);

    ...
}

That will involve boxing for value types, but it will work.

Are you sure this is best done as a single method though, rather than (say) a generic interface which can be implemented by different converters?

Alternatively, you might want a Dictionary<Type, Delegate> like this:

Dictionary<Type, Delegate> converters = new Dictionary<Type, Delegate>
{
    { typeof(string), new Func<string, string>(x => x) }
    { typeof(int), new Func<string, int>(x => int.Parse(x)) },
}

then you'd use it like this:

public static T Foo<T>(string value)
{
    Delegate converter;
    if (converters.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out converter))
    {
        // We know the delegate will really be of the right type
        var strongConverter = (Func<string, T>) converter;
        return strongConverter(value);
    }
    // Oops... no such converter. Throw exception or whatever
}
  • I had to do return (T)(object)value; for String as well, but that works. Thanks! :-) – Christian Rygg Feb 21 '11 at 12:10
  • @Chris: The dictionary approach feels a little cleaner to me... and would avoid boxing for value types. – Jon Skeet Feb 21 '11 at 12:11
  • @Jon: The read method in question is a bit more complex than what I wrote here - I just highlighted the problem I had. So your alternative approach doesn't really relate, but I agree - that would be a cleaner approach to this kind of method. – Christian Rygg Feb 21 '11 at 12:17
  • @Jon: Just noticed you added (string) to the return statement for string. This doesn't work - it seems it must be (object), FYI. – Christian Rygg Feb 21 '11 at 12:31
  • I did a little benchmark... I think the compiler ignores the (T)(object) conversion (the times are the same if I call the "generic" function or if I call a more function that calls directly Int32.Parse) – xanatos Feb 21 '11 at 12:49

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