5

I have a dataframe called df which has the following columns header of data:

date           A    B     C   D    E    F      G          H       I
07/03/2016  2.08    1   NaN NaN 1029    2   2.65    4861688 -0.0388
08/03/2016  2.20    1   NaN NaN 1089    2   2.20    5770819 -0.0447
:                                                                 :   

09/03/2016  2.14    1   NaN NaN 1059    2   2.01    5547959 -0.0514
10/03/2016  2.25    1   NaN NaN 1089    2   1.95    4064482 -0.0520

Is there a way to change the order of the columns so that column F is moved to a position that is after column H. The resulting df would look like:

date           A    B     C   D    E    F      G          H  F       I
07/03/2016  2.08    1   NaN NaN 1029    2   2.65    4861688  2 -0.0388
08/03/2016  2.20    1   NaN NaN 1089    2   2.20    5770819  2 -0.0447
:                                                                    :   

09/03/2016  2.14    1   NaN NaN 1059    2   2.01    5547959  2 -0.0514
10/03/2016  2.25    1   NaN NaN 1089    2   1.95    4064482  2 -0.0520
  • But you want it also included before G? – user3483203 Jun 2 '18 at 20:38
5

Use this :

df = df[['date','A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','F','I']]

--- Edit

columnsName = list(df.columns)
F, H = columnsName.index('F'), columnsName.index('H')
columnsName[F], columnsName[H] = columnsName[H],columnsName[F]
df = df[columnsName]
  • 1
    Same as in the other question, if OP could hardcode this they wouldn't need to ask the question. – cs95 Jun 2 '18 at 20:54
  • edit answer is that better ? – asapo kL Jun 2 '18 at 21:05
  • I'm not sure, because his may not be what they're looking for, assuming they want to retain the F at its existing position. Well, you can fix that with list.insert. – cs95 Jun 2 '18 at 21:12
4

Use df.insert with df.columns.get_loc to dynamically determine the position of insertion.

col = df['F'] # df.pop('F') # if you want it removed
df.insert(df.columns.get_loc('H') + 1, col.name, col, allow_duplicates=True)

df
         date     A  B   C   D     E  F     G        H  F       I
0  07/03/2016  2.08  1 NaN NaN  1029  2  2.65  4861688  2 -0.0388
1  08/03/2016  2.20  1 NaN NaN  1089  2  2.20  5770819  2 -0.0447
...
  • 1
    You are right. But I dont think it is right to point out other answers’ limitations in the beginning of yours. I’d point out that you have a general solution rather than specific. Upvoted nonetheless. – Anton vBR Jun 2 '18 at 21:33
  • 1
    Removed because 2/3 of the other answers are no longer hardcoded, @AntonvBR – cs95 Jun 2 '18 at 21:35
  • 1
    However, in general, it is valid to point out the technical deficiencies of other answers... that's the whole point of this site :) I've even got one of them to edit a better one in. Their initial versions were not good precisely because they were specific. You don't want your code to work for one situation and fail for the 99 million others. – cs95 Jun 2 '18 at 21:36
1

This is one way via pd.DataFrame.iloc, which uses integer-location based indexing for selecting by position.

It's also a gentle reminder that pandas integer indexing is based on numpy.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

df = pd.DataFrame(columns=list('ABCDEFGHI'))

cols = np.insert(np.arange(df.shape[1]),
                 df.columns.get_loc('H')+1,
                 df.columns.get_loc('F'))

res = df.iloc[:, cols]

print(res)

Empty DataFrame
Columns: [A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, F, I]
Index: []
0

You can use:

df.reindex(['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'F', 'I'], axis=1)
  • 1
    Hardcoding the columns like this quite frankly defeats the purpose of the question. – cs95 Jun 2 '18 at 20:53
  • @coldspeed I read the question as OP doesn't understand how to reindex columns; you read it as OP doesn't understand how to find an entry in a list. I think the later one is very unlikely. From df.columns you can get a list, then it's just some general Python stuff. – llllllllll Jun 2 '18 at 21:01
  • If it's the former, then this is a duplicate. But I still think one should demonstrate good practices where possible ;-) – cs95 Jun 2 '18 at 21:11
0

Not for the author of this question, but perhaps for others.

list = df.columns.tolist() # list the columns in the df
list.insert(8, list.pop(list.index('F'))) # Assign new position (i.e. 8) for "F" 
df = df.reindex(columns= list) # Now move 'F' to ist new position

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.