1

This seems like a super simple thing but I can't find how to stop the error. Inside the if on the repairDetails variable I am getting an error saying that it's already defined in the scope. How would I go about getting around this as if it's null I still want to use that variable but set it as something else like below.

Realm realm = Realm.getDefaultInstance();

RepairDetails repairDetails = realm.where(RepairDetails.class).equalTo("deviceId", device.id).findFirst();

if(repairDetails == null){
    RepairDetails repairDetails = new RepairDetails();
}
2
  • take a look at any decent java scoping tutorial. – Shanu Gupta Jun 4 '18 at 9:27
  • You are declaring repairDetails two times, thats why you get that error. Also, the second one only exists on the if and takes priority when you reference it inside the if, over the one that is outside. But when you are past the if, only the first one exists, and it is still null. – Jorge.V Jun 4 '18 at 9:28
11

Why is my code broken here?

When the Java compiler see's the type listed again, RepairDetails repairDetails = new RepairDetails();

it assumes you are trying to define a variable. However, you already have that variable accessible in the outer scope.

The correct code simply drops the type, allowing you to assign repairDetails.

if(repairDetails == null){
    repairDetails = new RepairDetails();
}

Which turns repairDetails = new RepairDetails(); into an assignment, instead of a variable declaration.


(Tangentally related, but a question that usually follows after someone runs into this issue and thinks they have seen it before)

Why is it okay when the outer scope was a member, or super class member?

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/variables.html has a section that mentions declaring member variables, but local variables behave similarly, except they are contained to their scope of the method / braces that they are defined in, rather then the class.

There are a few times that Java allows clashing variable names from scopes, is when it's a local variable overriding a member variable. (a parameter is also a local variable) , or there is inheritance involved.

It's known as hiding. https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/hidevariables.html

methods can also be hidden. https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/override.html

But the behavior isn't what you expect here either.

The reason why this is unavoidable, is that members can be overriden by inheritance, and a super class may define a member that was previously used in local scope on a child class.

So the Java designers allowed hiding, as it's a lesser of the 2 evils, considering that you can disambiguate between super members, class members, and locals by prefixing the variable name with

  • member: this.repairDetails ,
  • super member: super.repairDetails ,
  • local: repairDetails
2
6

The Problem is that you are trying to define a new Variable.

change the

if(repairDetails == null){
    RepairDetails repairDetails = new RepairDetails();
}

to

if(repairDetails == null){
    repairDetails = new RepairDetails();
}

and it should work.

You don't need the type definition a second time and that is why you are getting a error.

4

Just remove the second declaration in the if:

RepairDetails repairDetails = new RepairDetails();

should actually just be:

repairDetails = new RepairDetails();

That way you're overwriting the previously declared variable rather than creating a new one in the scope.

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