368

Basically, as the title says. I'm wondering how I could add 1 day to an NSDate.

So if it were:

21st February 2011

It would become:

22nd February 2011

Or if it were:

31st December 2011

It would become:

1st January 2012.
2
  • 5
    Note that an NSDate does not represent a date, it represents a point in time. So it includes a time as well as a date.
    – Rog
    Feb 21, 2011 at 15:46
  • 4
    Agreed - you should be using Zack German's answer below. See Apple's Date and Time Programming Guide.
    – Ash Furrow
    Jul 12, 2012 at 17:02

30 Answers 30

777

Swift 5.0 :

var dayComponent    = DateComponents()
dayComponent.day    = 1 // For removing one day (yesterday): -1
let theCalendar     = Calendar.current
let nextDate        = theCalendar.date(byAdding: dayComponent, to: Date())
print("nextDate : \(nextDate)")

Objective C :

NSDateComponents *dayComponent = [[NSDateComponents alloc] init];
dayComponent.day = 1;

NSCalendar *theCalendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
NSDate *nextDate = [theCalendar dateByAddingComponents:dayComponent toDate:[NSDate date] options:0];

NSLog(@"nextDate: %@ ...", nextDate);

This should be self-explanatory.

8
  • 24
    You can also use negative components to subtract from a date.
    – DataGraham
    May 31, 2012 at 20:46
  • 59
    Much better solution than the selected answer Jul 9, 2012 at 16:54
  • 21
    +1 for using Date components rather than adding a day's worth of seconds.
    – Abizern
    Jan 1, 2013 at 0:29
  • Yes works well for daylight savings. Tip for DST check: Reset date and time on your mac and then restart your simulator, it will then follow your system time. Apr 1, 2013 at 5:00
  • 2
    In Swift you need to change the last parameter of the dateByAddingComponents call to NSCalendarOptions(rawValue: 0)
    – gfpacheco
    Dec 2, 2015 at 19:16
285

Since iOS 8 you can use NSCalendar.dateByAddingUnit

Example in Swift 1.x:

let today = NSDate()
let tomorrow = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
    .dateByAddingUnit(
         .CalendarUnitDay, 
         value: 1, 
         toDate: today, 
         options: NSCalendarOptions(0)
    )

Swift 2.0:

let today = NSDate()
let tomorrow = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
    .dateByAddingUnit(
        .Day, 
        value: 1, 
        toDate: today, 
        options: []
    )

Swift 3.0:

let today = Date()
let tomorrow = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: .day, value: 1, to: today)
2
  • 11
    Is it just me, or wouldn't it be much simpler for Swift to have something built in like date.add(.days, 1) ? *goes and builds an extension
    – quemeful
    Mar 15, 2019 at 15:47
  • 3
    @quemeful extension Date { func adding(_ component: Calendar.Component, _ value: Int) -> Date? { return Calendar.current.date(byAdding: component, value: value, to: self) } } usage Date().adding(.day, 1) // "Jun 6, 2019 at 5:35 PM"
    – Leo Dabus
    Jun 5, 2019 at 20:32
132

Swift 5

let today = Date()
let nextDate = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: .day, value: 1, to: today)

Objective-C

NSCalendar *gregorian = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar];
// now build a NSDate object for the next day
NSDateComponents *offsetComponents = [[NSDateComponents alloc] init];
[offsetComponents setDay:1];
NSDate *nextDate = [gregorian dateByAddingComponents:offsetComponents toDate: [NSDate date] options:0];
0
39

A working Swift 3+ implementation based on highmaintenance's answer and vikingosegundo's comment. This Date extension also has additional options to change year, month and time:

extension Date {

    /// Returns a Date with the specified amount of components added to the one it is called with
    func add(years: Int = 0, months: Int = 0, days: Int = 0, hours: Int = 0, minutes: Int = 0, seconds: Int = 0) -> Date? {
        let components = DateComponents(year: years, month: months, day: days, hour: hours, minute: minutes, second: seconds)
        return Calendar.current.date(byAdding: components, to: self)
    }

    /// Returns a Date with the specified amount of components subtracted from the one it is called with
    func subtract(years: Int = 0, months: Int = 0, days: Int = 0, hours: Int = 0, minutes: Int = 0, seconds: Int = 0) -> Date? {
        return add(years: -years, months: -months, days: -days, hours: -hours, minutes: -minutes, seconds: -seconds)
    }

}

Usage for only adding a day as asked by OP would then be:

let today = Date() // date is then today for this example
let tomorrow = today.add(days: 1)
3
  • 2
    You could shorten the code massively by using date components. Nov 12, 2018 at 15:10
  • You're right, although it has downsides in my opinion: - the code using the extension doesn't look as clean - it opens up some unnecessary options with components that make little sense like let foo = Date().add([.calendar: 1, .yearForWeekOfYear: 3] I'm adding the alternative solution to my answer though. Thanks for your suggestion, @vikingosegundo! Nov 13, 2018 at 12:25
  • 4
    well, I actually meant something different: gist.github.com/vikingosegundo/31ddb14920415ef444a9ab550411d4ff Nov 13, 2018 at 22:31
38

iOS 8+, OSX 10.9+, Objective-C

NSCalendar *cal = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];    
NSDate *tomorrow = [cal dateByAddingUnit:NSCalendarUnitDay 
                                   value:1 
                                  toDate:[NSDate date] 
                                 options:0];
1
  • Note that you can't mask the unit here (use only one). Jun 8, 2017 at 6:08
27

Swift 4.0 (same as Swift 3.0 in this wonderful answer just making it clear for rookies like me)

let today = Date()
let yesterday = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: .day, value: -1, to: today)
1
  • 3
    Did you forget to change your variable name? Sep 10, 2018 at 10:44
16

Update for Swift 4:

let now = Date() // the current date/time
let oneDayFromNow = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: .day, value: 1, to: now) // Tomorrow with same time of day as now
15

Use the below function and use days paramater to get the date daysAhead/daysBehind just pass parameter as positive for future date or negative for previous dates:

+ (NSDate *) getDate:(NSDate *)fromDate daysAhead:(NSUInteger)days
{
    NSDateComponents *dateComponents = [[NSDateComponents alloc] init];
    dateComponents.day = days;
    NSCalendar *calendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
    NSDate *previousDate = [calendar dateByAddingComponents:dateComponents
                                                     toDate:fromDate
                                                    options:0];
    [dateComponents release];
    return previousDate;
}
12

In swift

var dayComponenet = NSDateComponents()
dayComponenet.day = 1

var theCalendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
var nextDate = theCalendar.dateByAddingComponents(dayComponenet, toDate: NSDate(), options: nil)
11

It works!

NSCalendar *calendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
NSCalendarUnit unit = NSCalendarUnitDay;
NSInteger value = 1;
NSDate *today = [NSDate date];
NSDate *tomorrow = [calendar dateByAddingUnit:unit value:value toDate:today options:NSCalendarMatchStrictly];
1
  • 2
    my answer is more correct because if you use NSCalendarWrapComponents(0) option you can create date only in the range of current month. It means that if you add 1 day with NSCalendarWrapComponents to Jan,31 2016 you will get Jan,1 2016. With NSCalendarMatchStrictly option you will get next calendar date.
    – DenZhukov
    Feb 26, 2016 at 14:33
10

Swift 3.0 very simple implementation would be:

func dateByAddingDays(inDays: Int) -> Date {
    let today = Date()
    return Calendar.current.date(byAdding: .day, value: inDays, to: today)!
}
9

Swift 4.0

extension Date {
    func add(_ unit: Calendar.Component, value: Int) -> Date? {
        return Calendar.current.date(byAdding: unit, value: value, to: self)
    }
}

Usage

date.add(.day, 3)!   // adds 3 days
date.add(.day, -14)!   // subtracts 14 days

Note: If you don't know why the lines of code end with an exclamation point, look up "Swift Optionals" on Google.

7
NSDate *today=[NSDate date];
NSCalendar *calendar = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier: NSGregorianCalendar];
NSDateComponents *components=[[NSDateComponents alloc] init];
components.day=1;
NSDate *targetDate =[calendar dateByAddingComponents:components toDate:today options: 0];
7

Simple Swift extensions for yesterday and tomorrow from any date:

extension Date {
    
    var previousDay: Date {
        Calendar.current.date(byAdding: DateComponents(day:-1), to: self)!
    }
    
    var nextDay: Date {
        Calendar.current.date(byAdding: DateComponents(day:+1), to: self)!
    }
    
}

I'm force unwrapping the optionals based on advice in the question here:
When does dateByAddingComponents:toDate:options return nil?

5

In Swift 2.1.1 and xcode 7.1 OSX 10.10.5 ,you can add any number of days forward and backwards using function

func addDaystoGivenDate(baseDate:NSDate,NumberOfDaysToAdd:Int)->NSDate
{
    let dateComponents = NSDateComponents()
    let CurrentCalendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
    let CalendarOption = NSCalendarOptions()

    dateComponents.day = NumberOfDaysToAdd

    let newDate = CurrentCalendar.dateByAddingComponents(dateComponents, toDate: baseDate, options: CalendarOption)
    return newDate!
}

function call for incrementing current date by 9 days

var newDate = addDaystoGivenDate(NSDate(), NumberOfDaysToAdd: 9)
print(newDate)

function call for decrement current date by 80 days

newDate = addDaystoGivenDate(NSDate(), NumberOfDaysToAdd: -80)
 print(newDate)
5

Here is a general purpose method which lets you add/subtract any type of unit(Year/Month/Day/Hour/Second etc) in the specified date.

Using Swift 2.2

func addUnitToDate(unitType: NSCalendarUnit, number: Int, date:NSDate) -> NSDate {

    return NSCalendar.currentCalendar().dateByAddingUnit(
        unitType,
        value: number,
        toDate: date,
        options: NSCalendarOptions(rawValue: 0))!

}

print( addUnitToDate(.Day, number: 1, date: NSDate()) ) // Adds 1 Day To Current Date
print( addUnitToDate(.Hour, number: 1, date: NSDate()) ) // Adds 1 Hour To Current Date
print( addUnitToDate(.Minute, number: 1, date: NSDate()) ) // Adds 1 Minute To Current Date

// NOTE: You can use negative values to get backward values too
5
NSDateComponents *dayComponent = [[[NSDateComponents alloc] init] autorelease];
dayComponent.day = 1;

NSCalendar *theCalendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
dateToBeIncremented = [theCalendar dateByAddingComponents:dayComponent toDate:dateToBeIncremented options:0];

Ok - I thought this was going to work for me. However, if you use it to add a day to the 31st March 2013, it'll return a date that has only 23 hours added to it. It may well actually have the 24, but using in calculations has only 23:00 hours added.

Similarly, if you blast forward to 28th Oct 2013, the code adds 25 hours resulting in a date time of 2013-10-28 01:00:00.

In order to add a day I was doing the thing at the top, adding the:

NSDate *newDate1 = [now dateByAddingTimeInterval:60*60*24*daysToAdd];

Complicated, principally due to daylight saving.

1
  • once a year a day has just 23 hours. once 25. and every few years it has the length of 60*60*24 + 1 because of leap seconds. dates must cover all of this, and that is why the date handling of cocoa actually is great! Mar 6, 2015 at 17:40
4

You can use NSDate's method - (id)dateByAddingTimeInterval:(NSTimeInterval)seconds where seconds would be 60 * 60 * 24 = 86400

2
  • 3
    NSDate's addByTimeInterval was deprecated in iOS 4 (bit.ly/vtOzvU). Use dateByAddingTimeInterval (bit.ly/vRkFrN) instead.
    – billmaya
    Dec 11, 2011 at 13:03
  • 8
    days can have 23, 24 or 25 hours, because of daylight saving times. Dec 18, 2013 at 23:31
4

In swift you can make extension to add method in NSDate

extension NSDate {
    func addNoOfDays(noOfDays:Int) -> NSDate! {
        let cal:NSCalendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
        cal.timeZone = NSTimeZone(abbreviation: "UTC")!
        let comps:NSDateComponents = NSDateComponents()
        comps.day = noOfDays
        return cal.dateByAddingComponents(comps, toDate: self, options: nil)
    }
}

you can use this as

NSDate().addNoOfDays(3)
3
NSDate *now = [NSDate date];
int daysToAdd = 1;
NSDate *tomorrowDate = [now dateByAddingTimeInterval:60*60*24*daysToAdd];

NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
[dateFormatter setDateFormat:@"EEEE, dd MMM yyyy"];
NSLog(@"%@", [dateFormatter stringFromDate:tomorrowDate]);
1
  • who ever uses this code and runs in trouble: well deserved Mar 30, 2021 at 16:34
3

for swift 2.2:

let today = NSDate()
let tomorrow = NSCalendar.currentCalendar().dateByAddingUnit(
        .Day,
        value: 1,
        toDate: today,
        options: NSCalendarOptions.MatchStrictly)

Hope this helps someone!

3

update for swift 5

let nextDate = fromDate.addingTimeInterval(60*60*24)
1
  • 2
    Don't ever adjust dates using TimeInterval unless you specifically want a number of seconds. This will not work if you are dealing with changes to daylight savings, leap seconds, etc, etc.
    – Ben Dodson
    Sep 25, 2020 at 10:45
2
NSDate *now = [NSDate date];
NSCalendar *calendar = [[NSCalendar alloc] initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar];
NSDateComponents *components = [calendar components:NSYearCalendarUnit|NSMonthCalendarUnit|NSDayCalendarUnit fromDate:now];
NSDate *startDate = [calendar dateFromComponents:components];
NSLog(@"StartDate = %@", startDate);

components.day += 1;
NSDate *endDate = [calendar dateFromComponents:components];
NSLog(@"EndDate = %@", endDate);
2

I had the same problem; use an extension for NSDate:

- (id)dateByAddingYears:(NSUInteger)years
                 months:(NSUInteger)months
                   days:(NSUInteger)days
                  hours:(NSUInteger)hours
                minutes:(NSUInteger)minutes
                seconds:(NSUInteger)seconds
{
    NSDateComponents * delta = [[[NSDateComponents alloc] init] autorelease];
    NSCalendar * gregorian = [[[NSCalendar alloc]
                               initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSCalendarIdentifierGregorian] autorelease];

    [delta setYear:years];
    [delta setMonth:months];
    [delta setDay:days];
    [delta setHour:hours];
    [delta setMinute:minutes];
    [delta setSecond:seconds];

    return [gregorian dateByAddingComponents:delta toDate:self options:0];
}
2

Swift 2.0

let today = NSDate()    
let calendar = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()
let tomorrow = calendar.dateByAddingUnit(.Day, value: 1, toDate: today, options: NSCalendarOptions.MatchFirst)
2

Swift 4, if all you really need is a 24 hour shift (60*60*24 seconds) and not "1 calendar day"

Future: let dayAhead = Date(timeIntervalSinceNow: TimeInterval(86400.0))

Past: let dayAgo = Date(timeIntervalSinceNow: TimeInterval(-86400.0))

2

String extension: Convert String_Date > Date

extension String{
  func DateConvert(oldFormat:String)->Date{ // format example: yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss 
    let isoDate = self
    let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
    dateFormatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX") // set locale to reliable US_POSIX
    dateFormatter.dateFormat = oldFormat
    return dateFormatter.date(from:isoDate)!
  }
}

Date extension: Convert Date > String

extension Date{
 func DateConvert(_ newFormat:String)-> String{
    let formatter = DateFormatter()
    formatter.dateFormat = newFormat
    return formatter.string(from: self)
 }
}

Date extension: Get +/- Date

extension String{
  func next(day:Int)->Date{
    var dayComponent    = DateComponents()
    dayComponent.day    = day
    let theCalendar     = Calendar.current
    let nextDate        = theCalendar.date(byAdding: dayComponent, to: Date())
    return nextDate!
  }

 func past(day:Int)->Date{
    var pastCount = day
    if(pastCount>0){
        pastCount = day * -1
    }
    var dayComponent    = DateComponents()
    dayComponent.day    = pastCount
    let theCalendar     = Calendar.current
    let nextDate        = theCalendar.date(byAdding: dayComponent, to: Date())
    return nextDate!
 }
}

Usage:

let today = Date()
let todayString = "2020-02-02 23:00:00"
let newDate = today.DateConvert("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss") //2020-02-02 23:00:00
let newToday = todayString.DateConvert(oldFormat: "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss")//2020-02-02
let newDatePlus = today.next(day: 1)//2020-02-03 23:00:00
let newDateMinus = today.past(day: 1)//2020-02-01 23:00:00

reference: from multiple question
How do I add 1 day to an NSDate?
math function to convert positive int to negative and negative to positive?
Converting NSString to NSDate (and back again)

2

In Swift 4 or Swift 5, you can use like bellow:

let date = Date()
let yesterday = Calendar.current.date(byAdding: .day, value: -1, to: date)
let dateFormatter = DateFormatter()
dateFormatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd"
let yesterday_date = dateFormatter.string(from: yesterday!)
print("yesterday->",yesterday_date)

output:

Current date: 2020-03-02
yesterday date: 2020-03-01
1

Just for fun, with a few extensions and operator overloads, you can end up with something nice, like:

let today = Date()
let tomorrow = today + 1.days

, or

var date = Date()
date += 1.months

Below is the support code:

extension Calendar {
    struct ComponentWithValue {
        let component: Component
        let value: Int
    }
}

extension Int {
    var days: Calendar.ComponentWithValue {
        .init(component: .day, value: self)
    }
    
    var months: Calendar.ComponentWithValue {
        .init(component: .month, value: self)
    }
}

func +(_ date: Date, _ amount: Calendar.ComponentWithValue) -> Date {
    Calendar.current.date(byAdding: amount.component, value: amount.value, to: date)!
}

func +(_ amount: Calendar.ComponentWithValue, _ date: Date) -> Date {
    date + amount
}

func +=(_ date: inout Date, _ amount: Calendar.ComponentWithValue) {
    date = date + amount
}

The code is minimal, and can be easily extended to allow .months, .years, .hours, etc. Also support for subtraction (-) can be seamlessly added.

There is a forced unwrap, though, within the implementation of the + operator, however not sure under which circumstances can the calendar return a nil date.

-2

Use following code:

NSDate *now = [NSDate date];
int daysToAdd = 1;
NSDate *newDate1 = [now dateByAddingTimeInterval:60*60*24*daysToAdd];

As

addTimeInterval

is now deprecated.

1
  • 4
    days can have 23, 24 or 25 hours, because of daylight saving times Dec 18, 2013 at 23:31

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