15

This question already has an answer here:

When do you use self.property_name in Ruby?

marked as duplicate by legoscia, toniedzwiedz, Lance Roberts, BartoszKP, Gangadhar Oct 8 '13 at 21:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

35

Use self when calling a class's mutator. For example, this won't work:

class Foo
  attr_writer :bar
  def do_something
    bar = 2
  end
end

The problem is that 'bar = 2' creates a local variable named 'bar', rather than calling the method 'bar=' which was created by attr_writer. However, a little self will fix it:

class Foo
  attr_writer :bar
  def do_something
    self.bar = 2
  end
end

self.bar = 2 calls the method bar=, as desired.

You may also use self to call a reader with the same name as a local variable:

class Foo
  attr_reader :bar
  def do_something
    bar = 123
    puts self.bar
  end
end

But it's usually better to avoid giving a local variable the same name as an accessor.

19

self references the current object. This lends itself to many uses:

calling a method on the current object

class A
    def initialize val
        @val = val
    end
    def method1
        1 + self.method2()
    end
    def method2
        @val*2
    end
end

Here running A.new(1).method1() will return 3. The use of self is optional here - the following code is equivalent:

class A
    def initialize val
        @val = val
    end
    def method1
        1 + method2()
    end
    def method2
        @val*2
    end
end

self is not redundant for this purpose though - operator overloading makes it neccessary:

class A
    def initialize val
        @val = val
    end
    def [] x
        @val + x
    end
    def method1 y
        [y] #returns an array!
    end
    def method2 y
        self.[y] #executes the [] method
    end
end

This shows how self must be used if you want to call the current object's [] method.

referencing attributes

You can generate the methods to read and write to instance variables using attr_accessor and co.

class A
    attr_accessor :val
    def initialize val
        @val = val
    end
    def increment!
        self.val += 1
    end
 end

Using self is redundant here because you can just reference the variable directly, eg. @val. Using the previous class, A.new(1).increment! would return 2.

method chaining

You can return self to provide a form of syntactical sugar known as chaining:

class A
    attr_reader :val
    def initialize val
        @val = val
    end
    def increment!
        @val += 1
        self
    end
 end

Here, because we are returning the current object, methods can be chained:

A.new(1).increment!.increment!.increment!.val #returns 4

creating class methods

You can define class methods using self:

class A
    def self.double x
          x*2
    end
    def self.quadruple x
        self.double(self.double(x))
    end
end

This will enable you to call A.double(2) #= 4 and A.quadruple(2) #=8. Note that in a class method, self references that class because the class is the current object.

how the value of self is determined

The current value of self in a particular method is set to the object that that method was called upon. Normally this uses the '.' notation. When you run some_object.some_method(), self is bound to some_object for the duration of some_method, meaning that some_method can use self in one of the ways mentioned above.

0

Using self is used will reference the current object accessible within a program. Therefore, self.property is used when accessing a variable through a attr_accessor of some sort. In must cases, it can be used in place of @property from within an object.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.