For a challenge, a fellow code golfer wrote the following code:

import java.util.*;
public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    int size = 3;
    String[] array = new String[size];
    Arrays.fill(array, "");
    for(int i = 0; i <= 100; ) {
      array[i++%size] += i + " ";
    }
    for(String element: array) {
      System.out.println(element);
    }
  }
}

When running this code in Java 8, we get the following result:

1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88 91 94 97 100 
2 5 8 11 14 17 20 23 26 29 32 35 38 41 44 47 50 53 56 59 62 65 68 71 74 77 80 83 86 89 92 95 98 101 
3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 60 63 66 69 72 75 78 81 84 87 90 93 96 99 

When running this code in Java 10, we get the following result:

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 
2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 
2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 

The numbering is entirely off using Java 10. So what is happening here? Is it a bug in Java 10?

Follow ups from the comments:

  • The issue appears when compiled with Java 9 or later (we found it in Java 10). Compiling this code on Java 8, then running in Java 9 or any later version, including Java 11 early access, gives the expected result.
  • This kind of code is non-standard, but is valid according to the spec. It was found by Kevin Cruijssen in a discussion in a golfing challenge, hence the weird use case encountered.
  • Didier L found out that the issue can be reproduced with the much smaller and more understandable code:

    class Main {
      public static void main(String[] args) {
        String[] array = { "" };
        array[test()] += "a";
      }
      static int test() {
        System.out.println("evaluated");
        return 0;
      }
    }
    

    Result when compiled in Java 8:

    evaluated
    

    Result when compiled in Java 9 and 10:

    evaluated
    evaluated
    
  • The issue seems to be limited to the string concatenation and assignment operator (+=) with an expression with side effect(s) as the left operand, like in array[test()]+="a", array[ix++]+="a", test()[index]+="a", or test().field+="a". To enable string concatenation, at least one of the sides must have type String. Trying to reproduce this on other types or constructs failed.

  • 5
    Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Samuel Liew Jun 4 at 23:22
  • 13
    @JollyJoker It is limited to += applied to indirect String references. So first, your array must be a String[]. The issue doesn't occur with int[], long[] and friends. But yes, you're basically right! – Olivier Grégoire Jun 5 at 8:11
  • 27
    This has been assigned bug id JDK-8204322. – Stuart Marks Jun 5 at 15:19
  • 12
    Wow, sounds like I made a good call not upgrading past Java 8... – Mehrdad Jun 5 at 17:11
  • 19
    @Mehrdad Except if you have particularly horrible code, most likely you wouldn't be affected by this bug. – Didier L Jun 6 at 7:44
up vote 578 down vote accepted

This is a bug in javac starting from JDK 9 (which made some changes with regard to string concatenation, which I suspect is part of the problem), as confirmed by the javac team under the bug id JDK-8204322. If you look at the corresponding bytecode for the line:

array[i++%size] += i + " ";

It is:

  21: aload_2
  22: iload_3
  23: iinc          3, 1
  26: iload_1
  27: irem
  28: aload_2
  29: iload_3
  30: iinc          3, 1
  33: iload_1
  34: irem
  35: aaload
  36: iload_3
  37: invokedynamic #5,  0 // makeConcatWithConstants:(Ljava/lang/String;I)Ljava/lang/String;
  42: aastore

Where the last aaload is the actual load from the array. However, the part

  21: aload_2             // load the array reference
  22: iload_3             // load 'i'
  23: iinc          3, 1  // increment 'i' (doesn't affect the loaded value)
  26: iload_1             // load 'size'
  27: irem                // compute the remainder

Which roughly corresponds to the expression array[i++%size] (minus the actual load and store), is in there twice. This is incorrect, as the spec says in jls-15.26.2:

A compound assignment expression of the form E1 op= E2 is equivalent to E1 = (T) ((E1) op (E2)), where T is the type of E1, except that E1 is evaluated only once.

So, for the expression array[i++%size] += i + " ";, the part array[i++%size] should only be evaluated once. But it is evaluated twice (once for the load, and once for the store).

So yes, this is a bug.


Some updates:

The bug is fixed in JDK 11 and there will be a back-port to JDK 10 (but not JDK 9, since it no longer receives public updates).

Aleksey Shipilev mentions on the JBS page (and @DidierL in the comments here):

Workaround: compile with -XDstringConcat=inline

That will revert to using StringBuilder to do the concatenation, and doesn't have the bug.

  • 32
    By the way, this applies to the entire left hand side expression, not only the index providing sub-expression. This expression may be arbitrarily complex. See for example IntStream.range(0, 10) .peek(System.out::println).boxed().toArray()[0] += ""; – Holger Jun 5 at 9:45
  • 9
    @Holger The left hand side does not even need to involve arrays, the issue also occurs with a simple test().field += "sth". – Didier L Jun 5 at 11:40
  • 41
    Not that it matters, the behavior is horribly broken anyway, but the first evaluation is for the store and the second for the load, so array[index++] += "x"; will read from array[index+1] and write to array[index] – Holger Jun 5 at 12:08
  • 5
    @TheCoder Yeah I think so. JDK 9 is not a long term support (LTS) release. JDK 8 was, and the next LTS release is JDK 11. See here: oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/eol-135779.html Note that public updates to JDK 9 ended in March. – Jorn Vernee Jun 6 at 8:37
  • 14
    On JDK-8204322, Aleksey Shipilev suggested to compile with -XDstringConcat=inline as a workaround, for those who need it. – Didier L Jun 6 at 19:50

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