10

I have recently started to learn Ruby. I know that Ruby is a interpreted language(even though "every" language is since it is interpreted by the CPU as machine code). But how does the ruby interpreter convert the code written in Ruby to machine code? I have read that the interpreter do not read the source code, but byte code, however I do never have to compile as I do in Java. So, is this yet another thing that Ruby does for you? And if it does, does it generate the byte code at runtime? Because you never get a .class file as you do in Java. And on top of it all I read about Just-In-Time compilators that obviously does something to the byte code so it runs faster.

If the above is the case does the interpreter first scan through all of the source code, convert it into byte code and then compiles it another time with JIT at runtime?

And last I AM NOT looking for an answer with the performance aspect of this, I just want to know how it is processed, which stages it goes through and in what time it does so.

Thanks for your time.

I am using this interpeter http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/

4
  • 1
    From your question, should we assume you use JRuby, the Java implementation of ruby? – Sébastien Le Callonnec Feb 21 '11 at 16:29
  • No I am using the standard from the Ruby website. – user626912 Feb 21 '11 at 16:32
  • JIT? You mean android Jit? you using jruby in android? – wizztjh Feb 21 '11 at 16:36
  • ohh , Just-In-Time compilators ... ok .. – wizztjh Feb 21 '11 at 16:37
9

But how does the ruby interpreter convert the code written in Ruby to machine code?

It doesn't, at least not all the implementations.

Afaik only Rubinius is trying to do what you describe, that's compiling to machine code.

I have read that the interpreter do not read the source code, but byte code, however I do never have to compile as I do in Java. So, is this yet another thing that Ruby does for you?

Yes

And if it does, does it generate the byte code at runtime?

Yeap, pretty much. And keeps it in memory. The tradeof is the next time it has to read->translate->execute all over again.

If the above is the case does the interpreter first scan through all of the source code, convert it into byte code and then compiles it another time with JIT at runtime?

Not all the source code, just what it needs. Then yes, create a bytecode representation keeps it in memory, and not necessarily that is compiled to machine code.

3
  • Thanks for a great answer! I have updated my post to show with interpreter I use. I think I understand it know. You say that only the source code needed is converted to byte code, what does this mean? That only the source code needed for the objects, methods etc. that the program use is converted? And then the converted source code will be stored in the interpreter so that next time(if I do not change anything) will execute faster(even though it am not out for performance, just understanding). So the interpreter only understand to execute the bytecode generated right? – user626912 Feb 21 '11 at 17:18
  • And one more thing that I need to add, the bytecode that the interpreter reads is eventually evaluted into machine code ofcourse right? And if it was a JIT compiler it would take the bytecode and make something magic happen to that as-well? – user626912 Feb 21 '11 at 17:20
  • What OscarRyz says is accurate for Ruby 1.9. Ruby 1.8 was a much simpler true interpreter that walked the AST. – Chuck Feb 21 '11 at 18:05
3

The standard implementation of Ruby1.8 uses an interpreter called MRI (Matz's Ruby Interpreter). This is a program that is compiled to machine code that:

  1. Reads the text files into a data structure.
  2. Follows the instructions in the data structure to decide what to do

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.