8

I have a numpy array that is split by each row:

splitArray:


[[0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0]]

I was hoping to merge said splitArray every 4 rows, and the last subarray not necessarily having to be 4, but just the remainder of what's left.

Below is the array I hope to have:

joinedArray:


[[0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0],
 [0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0,
  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  0]]
  • 3
    Unless you want to convert back to list rather than np.array, you can't have rows of unequal length. – Aaron Jun 4 '18 at 17:33
  • numpy does not do well with jagged arrays – user3483203 Jun 4 '18 at 17:33
3

As a pure Numpythonic approach you can find all the desired indexes for splitting your array by creating a range from chunking number to number of rows with the chunking number as thestep arg of the range. Then use np.split() to split your array:

In [24]: def chunk_array(arr, ch):
    ...:     x = arr.shape[0]
    ...:     return np.split(a, np.arange(ch, x, ch))
    ...: 
    ...: 

Demo:

In [25]: chunk_array(a, 4)
Out[25]: 
[array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]), array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]), array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]), array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])]

In [26]: chunk_array(a, 3)
Out[26]: 
[array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]), array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]), array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]), array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]), array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])]

If you want the chunked arrays to be concatenated you can use @jpp's answer with np.concatenate() and map or slightly different in a list comprehension.

In [75]: def chunk_array(arr, ch):
    ...:     x = arr.shape[0]
    ...:     return [np.concatenate(subs) for subs in np.split(arr, np.arange(ch, x, ch))]
  • This doesn't actually push the work down to C any more than the list comprehension does, though; numpy.split iterates at Python level and slices the array the same way the list comprehension does, but with extra overhead. – user2357112 Jun 4 '18 at 21:40
  • @user2357112 Yes, but np.split is functional, Numpythonic and more adjustable with other Numpy function. Also another important point in order to prevent future users from heading in a wrong direction is that the term "list comprehension iterations perform at C" or "pushes down the work to C" (as it's mentioned in many books, SO answers, blog posts, etc.) is one of the most pervasive, utterly false myths about Python. The list comprehension is faster because suspending and resuming a function's frame is slow, not because there's anything particularly special about list comprehensions. – Kasrâmvd Jun 5 '18 at 11:00
  • I started off with this (in fact, my np.split implementation is identical), but then OP's desired output is something else. Should question be modified or answer clarified as to what we're aiming for? – jpp Jun 5 '18 at 15:09
  • 1
    @jpp You're completely right. I didn't notice that as even the other answer with list comprehension doesn't concatenate the sub-arrays. Let me update the answer. I still don't know why your answer is not accepted tho :)) but thanks for mentioning this. – Kasrâmvd Jun 5 '18 at 15:38
6

Using a list-comp:

[a[i:i+4] for i in range(0, len(a), 4)]
#[array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]),
# array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]),
# array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]),
# array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#        [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])]
  • 2
    If you're using a slice, the end [start:end] may safely exceed the length of the object in which case it's simply converted to -1. you can safely omit the min() statement with just a[i:i+4] – Aaron Jun 4 '18 at 17:40
  • @Aaron Cool, I think I really new that just couldn't quite remember - probably from traversing them backwards or something! – Joe Iddon Jun 4 '18 at 18:12
3

That can be done using the infamous grouper recipe.

>>> from itertools import zip_longest
>>> import numpy as np
>>> 
>>> data = [7 * [0] for i in range(14)]
>>> i=iter(data); list(map(np.concatenate, zip_longest(*4*(i,), fillvalue=[])))
[array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
       0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]), array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
       0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]), array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
       0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]), array([0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0.])]
2

You can use np.concatenate with np.split. If required, you can adjust the below example to output a list of lists instead of a list of arrays.

As mentioned, a single jagged numpy array is not a good idea.

A = np.zeros((14, 3))

res = list(map(np.concatenate, np.split(A, np.arange(4, A.shape[0], 4))))

print(res)

[array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]),
 array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]),
 array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]),
 array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])]

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.