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I am currently in the process of learning Kotlin to replace Java in my android applications but am struggling with null safety.

I am getting familiar with the process of the handling null and non-null variables, however, I am still unsure of "best practice" in terms of the implementation null/non-null variables in Kotlin.

For example, in Java I would have written something like:

UserAccount account;

if (account == null) {
    openLogin();
}

I understand I can replicate this in Kotlin but it seems as though the language is designed to avoid practice like this. How would I go about implementing this system through Kotlin, should I be adding a nullable variable?

  • Hi and welcome. Have you tried reading the doc ? kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/null-safety.html – Yassin Hajaj Jun 5 '18 at 2:38
  • 2
    Thanks! I have, it gives a good overview of how to use the null variables within the language and suggests that they can be avoided entirely but I am unsure on how to actually do that. How do I write my code snippet in Kotlin? Should I add a nullable variable? Should I rewrite the system somehow to avoid adding testing for null? – CampbellMG Jun 5 '18 at 2:43
  • I'm not sure the way to do in kotlin but you should try this way: Object smObj = null; smObj.toString(); – Johnny Ngo Jun 5 '18 at 2:44
  • This depends on the circumstances under which account can actually be null. Does it only "start out" null? Can it ever be null if there hasn't been an error? – Louis Wasserman Jun 5 '18 at 2:52
  • So in this circumstance, the user opens the app and has no account so in Java it would be null and that is an expected state. Is this okay to replicate in Kotlin or should I add some other check to avoid the possibility of a null account? What I am trying to avoid is applying a logic from Java to Kotlin where there may be a more effective, native method. – CampbellMG Jun 5 '18 at 3:02
5

I understand I can replicate this in Kotlin but it seems as though the language is designed to avoid practice like this.

Please note the distinction between a language without nulls and a null-safe language. Kotlin is the latter, which means it welcomes and embraces the null value, but, as opposed to a language like Java, puts a leash on it.

Kotlin offers you syntax to handle nullable types in a concise, readable and safe manner. For your example,

if (account == null){
    openLogin();
}

you can use this idiom:

account ?: openLogin()

At other moments you'll want to either act upon a non-null account or just skip that part of the code if it's null. Then you can use the optional derefence ?.:

account?.userName?.also { println("Username is $it") }
4

Likely this material can be useful: http://www.baeldung.com/kotlin-null-safety

You can search for let() and run() methods.

The let() method

To execute an action only when a reference holds a non-nullable value, we can use a let operator.

Let’s say that we have a list of values and there is also a null value in that list:

val firstName = "Tom"
val secondName = "Michael" val names:
List<String?> = listOf(firstName, null, secondName)

Next, we can execute an action on every non-nullable element of the names list by using a let function:

var res = listOf<String?>() for (item in names) {
     item?.let { res = res.plus(it) } }   
assertEquals(2, res.size)
assertTrue { res.contains(firstName) } 
assertTrue { res.contains(secondName) }

The run() method

Kotlin has a run() method to execute some operation on a nullable reference. It is very similar to let() but inside of a function body, the run() method operates on this reference instead of a function parameter:

var res = listOf<String?>()
for (item in names) {
    item?.run{res = res.plus(this)}
}
2

I understand I can replicate this in Kotlin but it seems as though the language is designed to avoid practice like this.

I'd say just the opposite, it's designed to support it. E.g. if you have

val account: UserAccount? = ...

if (account == null){
    openLogin()
} else {
    ...
}

the compiler knows account isn't null in the else branch, and it can effectively have non-nullable UserAccount type there. (Small caveat: in your case account is more likely to be a var, which puts some limitations on smart casts.)

How would I go about implementing this system through Kotlin, should I be adding a nullable variable?

You don't add a variable, you specify that account is nullable in its type.

Though for this specific case it may be better to use lateinit, depending on your requirements:

lateinit var account: UserAccount

...
if (!::account.isInitialized) {
    openLogin()
}

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