2

Quick sort with random pivot:

def quicksort(arr): # with random index
    if (len(arr) <= 1):
        return arr
    else:
        grt_arr = []
        less_arr = []
        rand_indx = random.randint(0,len(arr)-1)    
        pivot = arr[rand_indx] # picking up a random index
        #for ele in arr[1:]:
        for ele in (arr[0:rand_indx]+arr[rand_indx+1:]):
            if (ele <= pivot):
                less_arr.append(ele)
            elif (ele > pivot):
                grt_arr.append(ele)

    return quicksort(less_arr)+[pivot]+quicksort(grt_arr)

Quick sort with fixed pivot:

def quicksortfixedpivot(arr): # with fixed index
    if (len(arr) <= 1):
        return arr
    else:
        grt_arr = []
        less_arr = []
        pivot = arr[0] # picking up a fixed 0 index
        for ele in arr[1:]:
            if (ele <= pivot):
                less_arr.append(ele)
            elif (ele > pivot):
                grt_arr.append(ele)

    return quicksortfixedpivot(less_arr)+[pivot]+quicksortfixedpivot(grt_arr)

After running the algorithm on the following list, I get following results.

# create a list of random numbers
arr1 = (random.sample(range(0,10000000),1000000))

Running times are shown below:

%%time
out1 = (quicksort(arr1))

CPU times: user 8.74 s, sys: 219 ms, total: 8.95 s Wall time: 9.22 s

%%time
out2 = (quicksortfixedpivot(arr1))

CPU times: user 6.39 s, sys: 138 ms, total: 6.53 s Wall time: 6.54 s

Why is my quicksortfixedpivot faster than quicksort with fixed pivot?

  • 1
    Check your question's title! – Klaus D. Jun 5 '18 at 4:44
  • Are your results consistent (for different shuffling of arr1)? Can you count how many times you call random.randint, and time how long it takes to generate that many random integers? – pkpnd Jun 5 '18 at 4:52
  • I just ran it, and it looks like calls to randint add up to over 1.5 seconds (on my machine). That could be the problem right there. – Stephen Cowley Jun 5 '18 at 4:58
4

The problem is, in your random index one, the code rand_indx = random.randint(0,len(arr)-1) happens over 600,000 times. Though each call takes very little, this adds up.

Try it yourself: just add in the call to random.randint(0,len(arr)-1) to your fixed pivot and time them again.

  • Cogent idea how to pinpoint random.randint()'s contribution. – greybeard Jun 5 '18 at 5:22
  • Thank you all! Yes random.randint() was the cause. Appreciate your help! – user3303020 Jun 6 '18 at 5:21
3

For random data, choice of pivot won't make much difference, and the overhead of choosing a random pivot is probably part of the reason why it's slower. There's also the overhead of Python having to interpret more lines of code with the random version.

0

The average case complexity of a quicksort is O(N log N), however the actual complexity can vary between O(N) and O(N²) depending on your pivot choice and data. For instance, if your array is already sorted (or almost) choosing the first element as a pivot or the last element can either be a very bad pivot choice or a great choice.

A random pivot choice has the advantage to reduce the chances to fall into such a case.

However, since your dataset is random, your choice of pivot has little influence. To convince yourself, you can simply count the number of calls to each function.

I've done it on your code for 1000000 elements and the difference is lower than 0.1%.

The difference of computation time is probably caused by the only real difference in the code: the computation of random.randint(0,len(arr)-1)

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