18

For example, I have a string:

"abbbbccd"

b has the most occurrences. When using C++, the easiest way to handle this is inserting each character into a map<>. Do I have to do the same thing in C#? Is there an elegant way to do it using LINQ?

10 Answers 10

29
input.GroupBy(x => x).OrderByDescending(x => x.Count()).First().Key

Notes:

  • Note that .NET Core now has a microoptimization for OrderBy(...).First(), so this is now O(n) not O(n log n) – canton7 Oct 8 at 9:06
11

This because someone asked for a 2.0 version, so no LINQ.

Dictionary<char, int> dict = new Dictionary<char, int>();

int max = 0;

foreach (char c in "abbbbccccd")
{
    int i;
    dict.TryGetValue(c, out i);
    i++;
    if (i > max)
    {
        max = i;
    }
    dict[c] = i;
}

foreach (KeyValuePair<char, int> chars in dict)
{
    if (chars.Value == max)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", chars.Key, chars.Value);
    }
}

Instead this for the LINQ version. It will extract paired "bests" (aaaabbbb == a, b). It WON'T work if str == String.Empty.

var str = "abbbbccccd";

var res = str.GroupBy(p => p).Select(p => new { Count = p.Count(), Char = p.Key }).GroupBy(p => p.Count, p => p.Char).OrderByDescending(p => p.Key).First();

foreach (var r in res) {
    Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", res.Key, r);
}
9
string testString = "abbbbccd";
var charGroups = (from c in testString
                    group c by c into g
                    select new
                    {
                        c = g.Key,
                        count = g.Count(),
                    }).OrderByDescending(c => c.count);
foreach (var group in charGroups)
{
    Console.WriteLine(group.c + ": " + group.count);
}
3

Inspired from Stephen's answer, almost the same:

public static IEnumerable<T> Mode<T>(this IEnumerable<T> input)
{
    var dict = input.ToLookup(x => x);
    if (dict.Count == 0)
        return Enumerable.Empty<T>();
    var maxCount = dict.Max(x => x.Count());
    return dict.Where(x => x.Count() == maxCount).Select(x => x.Key);
}

var modes = "".Mode().ToArray(); //returns { }
var modes = "abc".Mode().ToArray(); //returns { a, b, c }
var modes = "aabc".Mode().ToArray(); //returns { a }
var modes = "aabbc".Mode().ToArray(); //returns { a, b }

Update: Did a quick benchmarking of this answer vs Jodrell's answer (release build, debugger detached, oh yes)

source = "";

iterations = 1000000

result:

this - 280 ms
Jodrell's - 900 ms

source = "aabc";

iterations = 1000000

result:

this - 1800 ms
Jodrell's - 3200 ms

source = fairly large string - 3500+ char

iterations = 10000

result:

this - 3200 ms
Jodrell's - 3000 ms
  • 1
    I'm almost interested enough to do a peformance comparison. There's probably not much in it. – Jodrell May 29 '13 at 16:20
  • @Jodrell post it if you do. I will try from my side too. – nawfal May 29 '13 at 16:43
2

EDIT 3

Here is my last answer which I think (just) shades Nawfal's for performance on longer sequences.

However, given the reduced complexity of Nawfal's answer, and its more universal performance, especially in relation to the question, I'd choose that.

public static IEnumerable<T> Mode<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source,
    IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = null)
{
    var counts = source.GroupBy(t => t, comparer)
        .Select(g => new { g.Key, Count = g.Count() })
        .ToList();

    if (counts.Count == 0)
    {
        return Enumerable.Empty<T>();
    }

    var maxes = new List<int>(5);
    int maxCount = 1;

    for (var i = 0; i < counts.Count; i++)
    {
        if (counts[i].Count < maxCount)
        {
            continue;
        }

        if (counts[i].Count > maxCount)
        {
            maxes.Clear();
            maxCount = counts[i].Count;
        }

        maxes.Add(i);
    }

    return maxes.Select(i => counts[i].Key);
}

EDIT 2


EDIT



If you want an efficient generic solution, that accounts for the fact that multiple items could have the same frequency, start with this extension,

IOrderedEnumerable<KeyValuePair<int, IEnumerable<T>>>Frequency<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source,
    IComparer<T> comparer = null)
{
    return source.GroupBy(t => t, comparer)
        .GroupBy(
            g => g.Count(),
            (k, s) => new KeyValuePair<int, IEnumerable<T>>(
                k,
                s.Select(g => g.First())))
        .OrderByDescending(f => f.Key);
}

This extension works in all of the following scenarios

var mostFrequent = string.Empty.Frequency().FirstOrDefault();

var mostFrequent = "abbbbccd".Frequency().First();

or,

var mostFrequent = "aaacbbbcdddceee".Frequency().First();

Note that mostFrequent is a KeyValuePair<int, IEnumerable<char>>.


If so minded you could simplify this to another extension,

public static IEnumerable<T> Mode<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source,
    IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = null)
{
    var mode = source.GroupBy(
            t => t,
            (t, s) => new { Value = t, Count = s.Count() }, comparer)
        .GroupBy(f => f.Count)
        .OrderbyDescending(g => g.Key).FirstOrDefault();

    return mode == null ? Enumerable.Empty<T>() : mode.Select(g => g.Value);
}

which obviously could be used thus,

var mostFrequent = string.Empty.Mode();

var mostFrequent = "abbbbccd".Mode();

var mostFrequent = "aaacbbbcdddceee".Mode();

here, mostFrequent is an IEnumerable<char>.

  • Nice solution. I think its the same as xanatos's second answer but with an extra check for empty collection check, which is good. Btw, the most occurrent thing is called mode, not median. – nawfal May 29 '13 at 16:04
  • 1
    @nawfal, I'm wondering why I made such a stupid error. Anyway, its essentially the same as Albin's answer too, empty check and generisiscm aside. What I don't understand is why the popular but inferior answer keeps getting the votes. – Jodrell May 29 '13 at 16:16
  • Jodrell, simple, its the shortest and sweetest for most at first sight. Or may be thats the functionality they wanted ;) – nawfal May 29 '13 at 16:46
  • @nawfal, I took on the performance gauntlet. – Jodrell May 30 '13 at 11:39
  • 1
    @nawfal, fixed it. I have to transcribe my code to get it up here and its prone to my very human errors. – Jodrell May 31 '13 at 15:03
1

Find the simplest and without built in function used

sample code and links

public char MostOccurringCharInString(string charString)
{
int mostOccurrence = -1;
char mostOccurringChar = ' ';
foreach (char currentChar  in charString)
{
    int foundCharOccreence = 0;
    foreach (char charToBeMatch in charString)
    {
        if (currentChar == charToBeMatch)
            foundCharOccreence++;
    }
    if (mostOccurrence < foundCharOccreence)
    {
        mostOccurrence = foundCharOccreence;
        mostOccurringChar = currentChar;
    }
 }
  return mostOccurringChar;
}

Know more about how to get max occurrence and what is the flow.

How to get max occurred character and max occurrence in string

0

Code:

class CharCount
{
    public void CountCharacter()
    {
        int n;
        Console.WriteLine("enter the no. of elements: ");
        n = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

        char[] chararr = new char[n];
        Console.WriteLine("enter the elements in array: ");
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            chararr[i] = Convert.ToChar(Console.ReadLine());
        }
        Dictionary<char, int> count = chararr.GroupBy(x => x).ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Count());

        foreach(KeyValuePair<char, int> key in count)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Occurrence of {0}: {1}",key.Key,key.Value);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
  • This code shows frequencies of each letter, not max one as asked in the question. – Alexei Levenkov Jan 28 '17 at 1:40
0
        //find most occuring character and count from below string

        string totest = "abcda12Zernn111y";

        string maxOccuringCharacter = "";
        int maxOccurence = 0;string currentLoopCharacter = ""; string updatedStringToTest = "";int cnt = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < totest.Length; i++)
        {
            currentLoopCharacter = totest[i].ToString();
            updatedStringToTest = totest.Replace(currentLoopCharacter, "");

            cnt = totest.Length - updatedStringToTest.Length;

            if (cnt > maxOccurence)
            {
                maxOccuringCharacter = currentLoopCharacter;
                maxOccurence = cnt;
            }

            totest = updatedStringToTest;
        }

        Console.WriteLine("The most occuring character is {0} and occurence was {1}", maxOccuringCharacter, maxOccurence.ToString());
        Console.ReadLine();
0
#simplified expression using LINQ#
string text = "abccdeeef";
int length = text.ToCharArray().GroupBy(x => x).OrderByDescending(x => 
x.Count()).First().Count();
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow, and thanks for posting an answer! Generally, answers which are just code without any explanation get removed/downvoted. I'd suggest adding some explanation to your code, so that future viewers can understand it. – TJ Wolschon May 8 '18 at 12:35
0

This is Femaref's solution modified to return multiple letters if their Count matches. Its no longer a one-liner but still reasonably concise and should be fairly performant.

    public static IEnumerable<char> GetMostFrequentCharacters(this string str)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
            return Enumerable.Empty<char>();

        var groups = str.GroupBy(x => x).Select(x => new { Letter = x.Key, Count = x.Count() }).ToList();
        var max = groups.Max(g2 => g2.Count);
        return groups.Where(g => g.Count == max).Select(g => g.Letter);
    }

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