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This is the scenario :

B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B6 are blocks

S1, S2, S3 are slots

Each block can be put into specific slots.

ie, B1 = ["S1","S2", "S3"] . Means B1 can be put in to these 3 slots.

B2 = [S1, S2]

B3 = [S3]

You can make a product by taking one block from each slot -

ie, the recipe for the product is (1 from S1) + (1 from S2 )+ (1 from S3)

Need a function/algorithm to put these blocks in each slot to make maximum number of products.

In the given example - B3 will be in S3 because B3 is allowed to put in only that slot. However, although B1 can be put in any 3 slots we should put in S1 because to make device we need S1 + S2 + S3 and B3 Can only be in S3. So the best way to distribute blocks among slots will be : B1-> S1, B2 -> S2, B3 -> S3

So we can make one product as per recipe ie, (1 from S1 + 1 from S2 +1 from S3 )

Example Input
============
block_slots = {
    "BLOCK1" : ["SLOT - 1","SLOT - 3", "SLOT - 2"],
    "BLOCK2" : ["SLOT - 1","SLOT - 3"],
    "BLOCK3" : ["SLOT - 1","SLOT - 3", "SLOT - 2"],
    "BLOCK4" : ["SLOT - 1","SLOT - 2"],
    "BLOCK5" : ["SLOT - 3", "SLOT - 2"],
    "BLOCK6" : ["SLOT - 1","SLOT - 3", "SLOT - 2"],
    "BLOCK7" : ["SLOT - 1","SLOT - 3", "SLOT - 2"],
    "BLOCK8" : ["SLOT - 1","SLOT - 3", "SLOT - 2"],
    "BLOCK9" : ["SLOT - 3", "SLOT - 2"],
    "BLOCK10" : ["SLOT - 3", "SLOT - 2"],
    "BLOCK11" : ["SLOT - 1"],
    "BLOCK12" : ["SLOT - 2"],
}

Output
==========
{
    "BLOCK8": "SLOT - 1",
    "BLOCK9": "SLOT - 3",
    "BLOCK2": "SLOT - 1",
    "BLOCK3": "SLOT - 2",
    "BLOCK1": "SLOT - 3",
    "BLOCK6": "SLOT - 2",
    "BLOCK7": "SLOT - 1",
    "BLOCK4": "SLOT - 2",
    "BLOCK5": "SLOT - 3",
    "BLOCK10": "SLOT - 3",
    "BLOCK11": "SLOT - 1",
    "BLOCK12": "SLOT - 2"
}

> 4 Blocks in each slot. 4 Products can be made from 12 blocks which is
> maximum yield.

I tried the following code :

blocks = {
"B1" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
"B2" : ["S1","S3"],
"B3" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
"B4" : ["S1","S2"],
"B5" : ["S3", "S2"],
"B6" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
"B7" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
"B8" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
"B9" : ["S3", "S2"]
}
slot_count = {}
block_slot_final = {}

for block,block_slots in blocks.iteritems():

    for slot in block_slots:

         if slot in slot_count:
             slot_count[slot] = slot_count[slot] + 1
          else:
              slot_count[slot] = 0

blocks_sorted = sorted(blocks.items(), key=lambda items: len(items))

for block,slots in blocks_sorted:
    final_slot = slots[0]
    for slot in slots:
        if slot_count[slot] < slot_count[final_slot]:
            final_slot = slot
    block_slot_final[block] = final_slot

print block_slot_final

It gave this output

{'B4': 'S1', 'B5': 'S3', 'B6': 'S1', 'B7': 'S1', 'B1': 'S1', 'B2': 'S1', 'B3': 'S1', 'B8': 'S1', 'B9': 'S3'}

With this, we cannot make any product as there is no block in S2.


Tried another solution which better but still not perfect. Below is the code. it gave this output :

{'B4': 'S1', 'B5': 'S3', 'B6': 'S2', 'B7': 'S1', 'B1': 'S3', 'B2': 'S1', 'B3': 'S2', 'B8': 'S3', 'B9': 'S2'}

def get_least_consumed_slot(block_slot,slots):

    least_consumed_slot = slots[0]
    for slot in slots:
        if slot_block_count[slot] < slot_block_count[least_consumed_slot]:
            least_consumed_slot = slot

    return least_consumed_slot

blocks = {
    "B1" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
    "B2" : ["S1","S3"],
    "B3" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
    "B4" : ["S1","S2"],
    "B5" : ["S3", "S2"],
    "B6" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
    "B7" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
    "B8" : ["S1","S3", "S2"],
    "B9" : ["S3", "S2"]
}

slot_occurance_count = {}
block_slot_final = {}
all_slots = []
slot_block_count = {}

for block,block_slots in blocks.iteritems():

    for slot in block_slots:
        if slot not in all_slots:
            all_slots.append(slot)
            slot_block_count[slot] = 0

        if slot in slot_occurance_count:
            slot_occurance_count[slot] = slot_occurance_count[slot] + 1
        else:
            slot_occurance_count[slot] = 1

blocks_sorted = sorted(blocks.items(), key=lambda items: len(items))

for block,slots in blocks_sorted:
    # final_slot = slots[0]
    # for slot in slots:
    #     if slot_occurance_count[slot] < slot_occurance_count[final_slot]:
    #         final_slot = slot
    # block_slot_final[block] = final_slot
    least_consumed_slot = get_least_consumed_slot(block_slot_final,slots)
    block_slot_final[block] = least_consumed_slot

    slot_block_count[least_consumed_slot] = slot_block_count[least_consumed_slot] + 1


print block_slot_final
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  • This is somewhat broad. You can tackle this with all those combinatorial-opt tools like Integer-programming, Constraint-programming and even SAT-solving and free software is available. But it's unclear if that's for example the only product/recipe you got?
    – sascha
    Jun 5 '18 at 12:29
  • 1
    The B3 -> S2 is probably an error and B2 -> S2 makes sense in this setting. It's kind of a nice problem (when evaluating hardness / searching for solution in P; i think it might be in P, at least for this single product-recipe), but i'm afraid it's going to be closed.
    – sascha
    Jun 5 '18 at 12:57
  • 1
    Is the solution B2 -> S1, B1 -> S2, B3 -> S3 also valid? Do you want both of these solutions or is there some reason to prefer one to the other? Jun 5 '18 at 12:58
  • Ignoring (potential?) polynomial-approaches, you can find a prototype (not much tuned/advanced) integer-programming based approach here. While theoretically exponential in worst-case, this might scale well (depending somewhat on the solver). Don't take it as copy-paste code (non-trivial install:CBC+cvxpy), but as inspiration for some approach which probably does what you want to do (according to your example). There are some open-source MIP-solvers available. Without cvxpy, you might need to linearize the objective (not hard).
    – sascha
    Jun 5 '18 at 15:58
  • The above code now contains a remark, as it seems, every basic feasible solution is integral. I don't have the time to think about a proof (or checking the resulting constraint-matrix), but if this would be true, you could use any (high-quality) LP-solver (providing BFSs; e.g. Simplex-based) and those would (under this assumption) scale to millions of elements. (or just use a MIP-solver and he will exploit it automatically and still provide optimums, potentially using exp-time if this assumption is wrong).
    – sascha
    Jun 5 '18 at 16:36
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Pending clarification, this is either a problem of enumerating all maximum matchings (1) or finding one maximum matching (2).

(1) Algorithms for Enumerating All Perfect, Maximum and Maximal Matchings in Bipartite Graphs Takeaki UNO http://research.nii.ac.jp/~uno/papers/isaac97web.pdf

(2) e.g., Hopcroft--Karp https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopcroft%E2%80%93Karp_algorithm

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  • (Restricting to one max matching) Can you elaborate? I don't see it yet. The left-graph is probably B0-Bn, but what's the right-graph: S0, S1, S2 does not help, and even if this is somewhat bloated by one more dimension i don't see any max-product optimization, which is not a characteristic of active edges, but balancing right-node inputs (while maximizing those inputs). I think, including costs, this balancing can be expressed linearily (or at least a-priori linearized), but i'm too lazy to check it for now. Did i miss something?
    – sascha
    Jun 5 '18 at 13:11
  • @sascha The graph for the example is B1 -- S1, B1 -- S2, B1 -- S3, B2 -- S1, B2 -- S2, B3 -- S3. Jun 5 '18 at 13:12
  • And does this transfer to #blocks > #slots (which is actually the task imho)? I'm still a bit sceptic (but eager to learn).
    – sascha
    Jun 5 '18 at 13:25
  • @sascha Some matching algorithms (e.g., the Hungarian algorithm) require that a perfect matching exists (which entails #blocks = #slots), but some, like Hopcroft--Karp, accept any bipartite graph and try to match as many vertices as they can, potentially leaving some unmatched. Jun 5 '18 at 13:27
  • Yeah, but this completely ignores that the slots are not binary, but bins/containers (as i understand; everything else makes little sense to me) which can hold multiple elements and the cost to optimize is max(min(container-sizes)) (math opt-costs equal to his recipe-setup). Are we talking about different problems?
    – sascha
    Jun 5 '18 at 13:47
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This is a bipartite matching problem as described here, and can be solved with the Ford-Fulkerson algorithm: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matching_(graph_theory)#In_unweighted_bipartite_graphs

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