1

I can't understand why this TypeScript code should compile (TypeScript 2.8.3 all strict checks on)

I've cast an object to type IUser and included a property which doesn't exist "bob"

I've read the documentation on excess checks - https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/interfaces.html#excess-property-checks

But it still doesn't make sense that this should compile - given I'm casting it.

The ultimate question is: How can I actually get proper typing on this object - such that casting it to an object with non-interface members (a possibly/likely typo) should fail to compile.

interface IUser {
    name: string
}

const func = (user: IUser) => {
    alert(user)
}

func(<IUser> {
    name: "bob",
    bob: true
} as IUser)
  • Why do you need the type assertion (the 'cast') to fail? If you had a function that accepted an IUser and you passed { name: "bob", bob: true }, it would fail. – cartant Jun 6 '18 at 2:05
  • @cartant I've updated the code so the function receives object type IUser, it still compiles – PandaWood Jun 6 '18 at 2:11
  • Without the type assertions, it will fail. With the type assertions, you are circumventing the excess property checks. – cartant Jun 6 '18 at 2:13
  • Right, I'm not forcing it to by abide to IUser, but inadvertently forcing it to compile by telling the compiler "don't worry it is IUser"... – PandaWood Jun 6 '18 at 2:14
3

Extra properties check is done only when assigning object literal to a variable or function parameter. Adding any kind of cast disables the check, because the value actually is assignable to the type. This feature is called Strict object literal assignment checking:

It is an error to specify properties in an object literal that were not specified on the target type, when assigned to a variable or passed for a parameter of a non-empty target type.

Example where the an extra property gives an error:

interface IUser {
  name: string
}

const anotherFunc = function (u: IUser) {
    // whatever
}

const func = function() {
    anotherFunc({
        name: "bob",
        bob: true
    })
}

// Argument of type '{ name: string; bob: boolean; }' is not assignable to parameter of type 'IUser'.
//   Object literal may only specify known properties, and 'bob' does not exist in type 'IUser'.
  • Thanks, and here I was thinking that adding the type was making the code clearer, but I was actually making it looser – PandaWood Jun 7 '18 at 0:29
  • Type casts, also called type assertions, are a way to tell the compiler “trust me, I know what I’m doing". In TypeScript, they are useful only when compiler can't figure out types on its own, and could be harmful otherwise. – artem Jun 7 '18 at 0:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.