1

I follow the tour of Go to learning GOLANG.

And I have a question at this step: https://tour.golang.org/moretypes/11

  package main

  import "fmt"

  func main() {
    s := []int{2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13}
    printSlice(s)

    // Step1 Slice the slice to give it zero length.
    s = s[:0]
    printSlice(s)

    // Step2 Extend its length.
    // Why after extend the length of the slice, the value in this slice is still  [2 3 5 7]
    s = s[:4]
    printSlice(s)

    // Step 3 Drop its first two values.
    s = s[2:]
    printSlice(s)
  }

  func printSlice(s []int) {
    fmt.Printf("len=%d cap=%d %v\n", len(s), cap(s), s)
  }

The output:

len=6 cap=6 [2 3 5 7 11 13]
len=0 cap=6 []
len=4 cap=6 [2 3 5 7]
len=2 cap=4 [5 7]

Why after extending the length of the slice at the second step, the value in this slice is still [2 3 5 7]? I think the value in this slice is [0 0 0 0] because I have sliced the origin slice at the first step.

And I have another question is that why the third step can change the capacity of the slice but the first second cannot.

3
  • 1
  • @mkopriva Slice internals parts can answer my questions very well. 1. slice is a descriptor of an array segment. 2. The capacity is the number of elements in the underlying array (beginning at the element referred to by the slice pointer). Thanks
    – shawn
    Jun 6 '18 at 7:17
  • 1
    It is explained to an extent a couple pages early in the Tour. Slicing and re-slicing still leave you with the same underlying array, and the values in that array have not changed, so there is no reason to expect the values in the slice (which is just a view of that array) to change.
    – Adrian
    Jun 6 '18 at 11:48
3

Because the first time extending does not change the slice's pointer address. So s also points to the [2 3 5 7 11 13] address.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "unsafe"
)

func main() {
    s := []int{2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13}
    printSlice(s)

    // Slice the slice to give it zero length.
    s = s[:0]
    printSlice(s)

    // Extend its length.
    s = s[:4]
    printSlice(s)

    // Drop its first two values.
    s = s[2:]
    printSlice(s)
}

func printSlice(s []int) {
    fmt.Printf("len=%d cap=%d %v array ptr: %v \n", len(s), cap(s), s,(*unsafe.Pointer)(unsafe.Pointer(&s)))
}

the terminal shows:

len=6 cap=6 [2 3 5 7 11 13] array ptr: 0xc04200a2a0
len=0 cap=6 [] array ptr: 0xc04200a2a0
len=4 cap=6 [2 3 5 7] array ptr: 0xc04200a2a0
len=2 cap=4 [5 7] array ptr: 0xc04200a2b0

you see, the third step changes the ptr address because of first item is changed. so you know...

2
  • 1
    This answer is a little misleading - the pointer address changes because the start index changed, but it still points at the same underlying array the entire time.
    – Adrian
    Jun 6 '18 at 11:46
  • When I run the same code snippet I get a different ptr address for each step (not just the final one as shown in the answer). Why would that be? gist.github.com/rmoff/bdf119be932186fca146b899d3b9f505 Jun 25 '20 at 8:01

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