91

ECMAScript 5 has the filter() prototype for Array types, but not Object types, if I understand correctly.

How would I implement a filter() for Objects in JavaScript?

Let's say I have this object:

var foo = {
    bar: "Yes"
};

And I want to write a filter() that works on Objects:

Object.prototype.filter = function(predicate) {
    var result = {};

    for (key in this) {
        if (this.hasOwnProperty(key) && !predicate(this[key])) {
            result[key] = this[key];
        }
    }

    return result;
};

This works when I use it in the following demo, but when I add it to my site that uses jQuery 1.5 and jQuery UI 1.8.9, I get JavaScript errors in FireBug.

Object.prototype.filter = function(predicate) {
  var result = {};
  for (key in this) {
    if (this.hasOwnProperty(key) && !predicate(this[key])) {
      console.log("copying");
      result[key] = this[key];
    }
  }
  return result;
};

var foo = {
  bar: "Yes",
  moo: undefined
};

foo = foo.filter(function(property) {
  return typeof property === "undefined";
});

document.getElementById('disp').innerHTML = JSON.stringify(foo, undefined, '  ');
console.log(foo);
#disp {
  white-space: pre;
  font-family: monospace
}
<div id="disp"></div>

  • What errors do you get, specifically? – NT3RP Feb 21 '11 at 22:43
  • What are the errors you're getting? Post them if possible :) – Zack The Human Feb 21 '11 at 22:45
  • There's a bit of ambiguous history wrt jQuery and scripts that extend Object.prototype: bugs.jquery.com/ticket/2721 – Crescent Fresh Feb 22 '11 at 2:44

10 Answers 10

136

Never ever extend Object.prototype.

Horrible things will happen to your code. Things will break. You're extending all object types, including object literals.

Here's a quick example you can try:

    // Extend Object.prototype
Object.prototype.extended = "I'm everywhere!";

    // See the result
alert( {}.extended );          // "I'm everywhere!"
alert( [].extended );          // "I'm everywhere!"
alert( new Date().extended );  // "I'm everywhere!"
alert( 3..extended );          // "I'm everywhere!"
alert( true.extended );        // "I'm everywhere!"
alert( "here?".extended );     // "I'm everywhere!"

Instead create a function that you pass the object.

Object.filter = function( obj, predicate) {
    var result = {}, key;
    // ---------------^---- as noted by @CMS, 
    //      always declare variables with the "var" keyword

    for (key in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key) && !predicate(obj[key])) {
            result[key] = obj[key];
        }
    }

    return result;
};
  • 7
    Not really an answer, this should really be a comment. But upvoted anyway because it is correct. – Dykam Feb 21 '11 at 22:44
  • 21
    @patrick: give a man a bread and you'll feed him for a day, teach him how to bake and you'll feed him for a lifetime (or something, I'm danish, I don't know the correct English sayings ;) – Martin Jespersen Feb 21 '11 at 22:52
  • 9
    You're doing it wrong... !predicate(obj[key]) should be predicate(obj[key]) – pyrotechnick Aug 22 '11 at 6:15
  • 4
    @patrick dw: No. First, I didn't mention extending/not extending prototypes. Second, developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… -- "Creates a new array with all elements that pass the test implemented by the provided function." Implementing the exact opposite on a global seems pretty silly, doesn't it? – pyrotechnick Aug 30 '11 at 6:58
  • 4
    @pyrotechnick: That's right, you didn't mention extending/not extending prototypes, and that's my point. You said I'm doing it wrong, but the only "it" I'm doing is telling OP to not extend Object.prototype. From the question: "This works..., but when I add it to my site..., I get JavaScript errors" If OP decides to implement a .filter() with the opposite behavior of that of Array.prototpe.filter, that's up to him/her. Please leave a comment under the question if you want to notify OP that the code is wrong, but don't tell me that I'm doing it wrong when it isn't my code. – user113716 Aug 30 '11 at 12:42
157

First of all, it's considered bad practice to extend Object.prototype. Instead, provide your feature as utility function on Object, just like there already are Object.keys, Object.assign, Object.is, ...etc.

I provide here several solutions:

  1. Using reduce and Object.keys
  2. As (1), in combination with Object.assign
  3. Using map and spread syntax instead of reduce
  4. Using Object.entries and Object.fromEntries

1. Using reduce and Object.keys

With reduce and Object.keys to implement the desired filter (using ES6 arrow syntax):

Object.filter = (obj, predicate) => 
    Object.keys(obj)
          .filter( key => predicate(obj[key]) )
          .reduce( (res, key) => (res[key] = obj[key], res), {} );

// Example use:
var scores = {
    John: 2, Sarah: 3, Janet: 1
};
var filtered = Object.filter(scores, score => score > 1); 
console.log(filtered);

Note that in the above code predicate must be an inclusion condition (contrary to the exclusion condition the OP used), so that it is in line with how Array.prototype.filter works.

2. As (1), in combination with Object.assign

In the above solution the comma operator is used in the reduce part to return the mutated res object. This could of course be written as two statements instead of one expression, but the latter is more concise. To do it without the comma operator, you could use Object.assign instead, which does return the mutated object:

Object.filter = (obj, predicate) => 
    Object.keys(obj)
          .filter( key => predicate(obj[key]) )
          .reduce( (res, key) => Object.assign(res, { [key]: obj[key] }), {} );

// Example use:
var scores = {
    John: 2, Sarah: 3, Janet: 1
};
var filtered = Object.filter(scores, score => score > 1); 
console.log(filtered);

3. Using map and spread syntax instead of reduce

Here we move the Object.assign call out of the loop, so it is only made once, and pass it the individual keys as separate arguments (using the spread syntax):

Object.filter = (obj, predicate) => 
    Object.assign(...Object.keys(obj)
                    .filter( key => predicate(obj[key]) )
                    .map( key => ({ [key]: obj[key] }) ) );

// Example use:
var scores = {
    John: 2, Sarah: 3, Janet: 1
};
var filtered = Object.filter(scores, score => score > 1); 
console.log(filtered);

4. Using Object.entries and Object.fromEntries

As the solution translates the object to an intermediate array and then converts that back to a plain object, it would be useful to make use of Object.entries (ES2017) and to use a method that does the opposite (i.e. create an object from an array of key/value pairs). At the time of writing the Object.fromEntries proposal is at stage 3. Firefox and, more recently, Chrome have implemented it. Otherwise a polyfill can be used.

It leads to these two "one-liner" methods on Object (including the polyfill):

Object.fromEntries = arr => Object.assign({}, ...arr.map( ([k, v]) => ({[k]: v}) ));
Object.filter = (obj, predicate) => 
                  Object.fromEntries(Object.entries(obj).filter(predicate));

// Example use:
var scores = {
    John: 2, Sarah: 3, Janet: 1
};

var filtered = Object.filter(scores, ([name, score]) => score > 1); 
console.log(filtered);

The predicate function gets a key/value pair as argument here, which is a bit different, but allows for more possibilities in the predicate function's logic.

  • Could it be more complex query? For example: x => x.Expression.Filters.Filter – IamStalker Oct 19 '16 at 11:16
  • 1
    @IamStalker, did you try? It does not matter, as long as you provide a valid function in the second argument. NB: I have no idea what .Filter is at the end, but if it is a function, you need to call it ( x => x.Expression.Filters.Filter() ) – trincot Oct 19 '16 at 12:36
  • so long! can be done on 1 line . check this – Abdennour TOUMI Nov 12 '16 at 11:17
  • Newer features may make for less code, but they also make for slower performance. Ed 3 compliant code runs more than twice as fast in most browsers. – RobG Feb 24 '17 at 23:17
  • 8
    This is by far the best answer. – Sheljohn Mar 5 '17 at 9:52
18

If you're willing to use underscore or lodash, you can use pick (or its opposite, omit).

Examples from underscore's docs:

_.pick({name: 'moe', age: 50, userid: 'moe1'}, 'name', 'age');
// {name: 'moe', age: 50}

Or with a callback (for lodash, use pickBy):

_.pick({name: 'moe', age: 50, userid: 'moe1'}, function(value, key, object) {
  return _.isNumber(value);
});
// {age: 50}
  • 4
    In the case of lodash you need to use _.pickBy for the second case – Attila Miklosi Apr 6 '17 at 7:53
  • thanks @AttilaMiklosim, I've updated the answer – Bogdan D May 12 '17 at 9:16
  • lodash is a bad solution because filtering for empty objects will also remove numbers. – mibbit Dec 29 '17 at 19:50
4

As patrick already stated this is a bad idea, as it will almost certainly break any 3rd party code you could ever wish to use.

All libraries like jquery or prototype will break if you extend Object.prototype, the reason being that lazy iteration over objects (without hasOwnProperty checks) will break since the functions you add will be part of the iteration.

  • upvoted for explaining the 'why' of this being a bad idea clearly and concisely. – Michael Liquori May 9 '17 at 16:56
2

Given

object = {firstname: 'abd', lastname:'tm', age:16, school:'insat'};

keys = ['firstname', 'age'];

then :

keys.reduce((result, key) => ({ ...result, [key]: object[key] }), {});
// {firstname:'abd', age: 16}

// Helper
function filter(object, ...keys) {
  return keys.reduce((result, key) => ({ ...result, [key]: object[key] }), {});
  
};

//Example
const person = {firstname: 'abd', lastname:'tm', age:16, school:'insat'};

// Expected to pick only firstname and age keys
console.log(
  filter(person, 'firstname', 'age')
)

  • This does not use a given predicate function as is required by the question. – trincot Nov 12 '16 at 11:47
2

I have created an Object.filter() which does not only filter by a function, but also accepts an array of keys to include. The optional third parameter will allow you to invert the filter.

Given:

var foo = {
    x: 1,
    y: 0,
    z: -1,
    a: 'Hello',
    b: 'World'
}

Array:

Object.filter(foo, ['z', 'a', 'b'], true);

Function:

Object.filter(foo, function (key, value) {
    return Ext.isString(value);
});

Code

Disclaimer: I chose to use Ext JS core for brevity. Did not feel it was necessary to write type checkers for object types as it was not part of the question.

// Helper function
function print(obj) {
    document.getElementById('disp').innerHTML += JSON.stringify(obj, undefined, '  ') + '<br />';
    console.log(obj);
}

Object.filter = function (obj, ignore, invert) {
    let result = {}; // Returns a filtered copy of the original list
    if (ignore === undefined) {
        return obj;   
    }
    invert = invert || false;
    let not = function(condition, yes) { return yes ? !condition : condition; };
    let isArray = Ext.isArray(ignore);
    for (var key in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key) &&
                !(isArray && not(!Ext.Array.contains(ignore, key), invert)) &&
                !(!isArray && not(!ignore.call(undefined, key, obj[key]), invert))) {
            result[key] = obj[key];
        }
    }
    return result;
};

let foo = {
    x: 1,
    y: 0,
    z: -1,
    a: 'Hello',
    b: 'World'
};

print(Object.filter(foo, ['z', 'a', 'b'], true));
print(Object.filter(foo, (key, value) => Ext.isString(value)));
#disp {
    white-space: pre;
    font-family: monospace
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/extjs/4.2.1/builds/ext-core.min.js"></script>
<div id="disp"></div>

  • Please check my vanilla answer and gist – Z. Khullah Dec 13 '18 at 18:24
  • 1
    @trincot Thanks, I updated the response to return a copy of the object, rather than an in-place return. – Mr. Polywhirl yesterday
1

How about:

function filterObj(keys, obj) {
  const newObj = {};
  for (let key in obj) {
    if (keys.includes(key)) {
      newObj[key] = obj[key];
    }
  }
  return newObj;
}

Or...

function filterObj(keys, obj) {
  const newObj = {};
  Object.keys(obj).forEach(key => {
    if (keys.includes(key)) {
      newObj[key] = obj[key];
    }
  });
  return newObj;
}
0

My opinionated solution:

function objFilter(obj, filter, nonstrict){
  r = {}
  if (!filter) return {}
  if (typeof filter == 'string') return {[filter]: obj[filter]}
  for (p in obj) {
    if (typeof filter == 'object' &&  nonstrict && obj[p] ==  filter[p]) r[p] = obj[p]
    else if (typeof filter == 'object' && !nonstrict && obj[p] === filter[p]) r[p] = obj[p]
    else if (typeof filter == 'function'){ if (filter(obj[p],p,obj)) r[p] = obj[p]}
    else if (filter.length && filter.includes(p)) r[p] = obj[p]
  }
  return r
}

Test cases:

obj = {a:1, b:2, c:3}

objFilter(obj, 'a') // returns: {a: 1}
objFilter(obj, ['a','b']) // returns: {a: 1, b: 2}
objFilter(obj, {a:1}) // returns: {a: 1}
objFilter(obj, {'a':'1'}, true) // returns: {a: 1}
objFilter(obj, (v,k,o) => v%2===1) // returns: {a: 1, c: 3}

https://gist.github.com/khullah/872d5a174108823159d845cc5baba337

0

ES6 approach...

Imagine you have this object below:

const developers = {
  1: {
   id: 1,
   name: "Brendan", 
   family: "Eich"
  },
  2: {
   id: 2,
   name: "John", 
   family: "Resig"
  },  
  3: {
   id: 3,
   name: "Alireza", 
   family: "Dezfoolian"
 }
};

Create a function:

const filterObject = (obj, filter, filterValue) => 
   Object.keys(obj).reduce((acc, val) => 
   (obj[val][filter] === filterValue ? acc : {
       ...acc,
       [val]: obj[val]
   }                                        
), {});

And call it:

filterObject(developers, "name", "Alireza");

and will return:

{
  1: {
  id: 1,
  name: "Brendan", 
  family: "Eich"
  },
  2: {
   id: 2,
   name: "John", 
   family: "Resig"
  }
}
  • Looks good! But why does it return just the other object (and not the one with the name/filterValue of "Alireza")? – Pille Feb 7 at 16:19
  • @Pille, the OP asked for it to be like that (note the negative filter with !predicate in their own code). – trincot yesterday
-1

In these cases I use the jquery $.map, which can handle objects. As mentioned on other answers, it's not a good practice to change native prototypes (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Inheritance_and_the_prototype_chain#Bad_practice_Extension_of_native_prototypes)

Below is an example of filtering just by checking some property of your object. It returns the own object if your condition is true or returns undefined if not. The undefined property will make that record disappear from your object list;

$.map(yourObject, (el, index)=>{
    return el.yourProperty ? el : undefined;
});
  • $.map can take an object, but it returns an array, so the original property names are lost. The OP needs a filtered plain object. – trincot yesterday

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