1

I am trying to create a function that can be used in a variety of use cases for finding a value in a list (array). Here is the code I have:

function findInArray(needle, arr, exact, sensitive) {
  if (needle && arr) {
    var hayLength = arr.length
    for (var i = 0; i < hayLength; i++) {
      if (arr[0].length >= 0) {var haystack = arr[i][0];}
      else {haystack = arr[i];}
      if (exact && sensitive && (haystack === needle)) {return i;}
      else if (exact && !(sensitive) && (haystack == needle)) {return i;}
      else if (!(exact) && sensitive && (haystack.toLowerCase().search(needle.toLowerCase()))>-1) {return i;}
      else if (!(exact) && !(sensitive) && haystack.search(needle)>-1) {return i;}
    }
  }
  return -1;
}

I am sure the above code can be optimized, but I am not getting the third case to work when I want to match a string in a list ignoring case. E.g.

var arr = ["Partner1", "Partner2"]
var needle = "partner1"
var n = findInArray(needle, arr, true, false);

Returns -1.

I want the function to work with a 1D list, or multidimensional list, as well as find substrings (e.g. match "Google" and "Googler").

Answered: Combining @NoobishPro and @tehhowch "best of", this works well:

function findInArray(needle, arr, exact, sensitive) {
  exact = exact !== false;
  sensitive = sensitive !== false;

  //We will catch the sensitivity parameter here to save performance
  if (!sensitive) {
    needle = needle.toLowerCase();
  }

  //determine array length
  var hayLength = arr.length;
  for (var i = 0; i < hayLength; i++) {
    //Set haystack
    var haystack = arr[i];
    //Check if it's another array. If so, redo this function to go 1 level deeper.
    if (haystack.constructor == Array) {
      return findInArray(needle, haystack, exact, sensitive);
    }

    //We can lowercase it here to save on if-statement lowercasing
    if (!sensitive) {
      haystack = haystack.toLowerCase();
    }

    //easy one
    if (exact && sensitive && (haystack == needle)) {
      return i;
    } else if (exact & (haystack == needle)) {
      return i;
    } else if (!exact & (haystack.search(needle)) > -1) {
      return i;
    }
  }
  return -1;
}
2

WORKING JSFIDDLE

It's because your recursion attempt was all weird. Most of your code was pretty decent. You also forgot 1 toLowerCase().

This should work;

var arr = ["Partner1", "Partner2"]
var needle = "partner1"
var n = findInArray(needle, arr, true, false);
console.log(n);

function findInArray(needle, arr, exact, sensitive) {
  //Check if these attributes were even given
  if (typeof needle != 'undefined' && typeof arr != 'undefined') {
    if (arr.length < 1) {
      return -1;
    }
    if (typeof exact == 'undefined') {
      //Also making sure it's always set. Defaults to false.
      exact = false;
    }
    if (sensitive == 'undefined') {
      //Also making sure it's always set. Defaults to false.
      sensitive = false;
    }
    //determine array length
    var hayLength = arr.length;
    for (var i = 0; i < hayLength; i++) {
      //Set haystack
      var haystack = arr[i];
      //Check if it's another array. If so, redo this function to go 1 level deeper.
      if (haystack.constructor == Array) {
        return findInArray(needle, haystack, exact, sensitive);
      }

      //You got this quite right. Missed a toLowerCase on the last one.
      if (exact && sensitive && (haystack === needle)) {
        return i;
      } else if (exact && !(sensitive) && (haystack.toLowerCase() == needle.toLowerCase())) {
        return i;
      } else if (!(exact) && sensitive && (haystack.search(needle)) > -1) {
        return i;
      } else if (!(exact) && !(sensitive) && haystack.toLowerCase().search(needle.toLowerCase()) > -1) {
        return i;
      }
    }
  }
  return -1;
}

A few tiny optimisations

I also took the time to do a little optimisation for your code. JSFIDDLE

var arr = ["Partner1", "Partner2"]
var needle = "partner2"
var n = findInArray(needle, arr, true, false);
console.log(n);

function findInArray(needle, arr, exact, sensitive) {
  //Check if these attributes were even given
  if (typeof needle != 'undefined' && typeof arr != 'undefined') {
    if (arr.length < 1) {
      return -1;
    }
    if (typeof exact == 'undefined') {
      //Also making sure it's always set. Defaults to false.
      exact = false;
    }
    if (sensitive == 'undefined') {
      //Also making sure it's always set. Defaults to false.
      sensitive = false;
    }

    //We will catch the sensitivity parameter here to save performance
    if (!sensitive) {
      needle = needle.toLowerCase();
    }

    //determine array length
    var hayLength = arr.length;
    for (var i = 0; i < hayLength; i++) {
      //Set haystack
      var haystack = arr[i];
      //Check if it's another array. If so, redo this function to go 1 level deeper.
      if (haystack.constructor == Array) {
        return findInArray(needle, haystack, exact, sensitive);
      }

      //We can lowercase it here to save on if-statement lowercasing
      if (!sensitive) {
        haystack = haystack.toLowerCase();
      }

      //easy one
      if (exact && sensitive && (haystack == needle)) {
        return i;
      } else if (exact & (haystack == needle)) {
        return i;
      } else if (!exact & (haystack.search(needle)) > -1) {
        return i;
      }
    }
  }
  return -1;
}
  • 1
    For coercing optionals to a default true boolean, I like arg = arg !== false; – tehhowch Jun 7 '18 at 2:01
  • 1
    @tehhowch that sounds like something that could clean up some of my classes very neatly, thanks for the tip! I honestly didn't know it existed! Do you know where I can get a little bit more information on that syntactic sugar of yours? – NoobishPro Jun 7 '18 at 2:03
  • 1
    It's just plain JS, but may have unexpected results if your calling code thinks it can pass 0, "", null, etc. instead of false to activate the same behavior, because 0 is not strictly equal to false, so then arg will be cast to the boolean true. – tehhowch Jun 7 '18 at 2:10
  • 1
    @tehhowch ah, sounds like a good reason not to use it, then. I'd rather keep stable similar code than to make an exception for only 1 specific type. Did you know this one? I found it to be very confusing as well; arr = arr || [] if only I knew what to call these shorthands so I could google them... – NoobishPro Jun 7 '18 at 2:14
  • 1
    Double-pipe is a short-circuit operator. If arr is truthy, arr stays as what it is. Otherwise, it becomes an empty array. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… As far as my original comment, if you drop the strict equality (!== -> !=) then arg (=0) = (0 != false) is arg = (false != false) -> arg = (false) -> arg = false. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/31155477/… – tehhowch Jun 7 '18 at 2:16
0

You can use builtin Array.prototype.find or Array.prototype.indexOf

var arr = ["Partner1", "Partner2"];
var needle = "partner1";
var n = findInArray(needle, arr, true, false);
console.log(n);
function findInArray (input, array, exact, caseSenstive) {
   if (caseSenstive) {
      input = input.toLowerCase();
   }
   if (!exact){
      return array.find(i => i.toLowerCase().indexOf(input)) || -1;
   }
   if (caseSenstive) {
      return array.find(i => i === input) || -1;
   }
   return array.find(i => i.toLowerCase() === input) || -1;
}

  • Returns index value not position. – Steve Gon Jun 7 '18 at 2:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.