1

I have an array that holds many objects. When I set the array to nil, will gc collect all the objects holded by the array?

package main

import (
    "time"
    "runtime"
)

type B struct {
    bb []int
}

func NewB() *B {
    return new(B)
}

func main()  {
    var bs = make([]*B, 10)
    for i:=0; i<10; i++ {
        bs[i] = NewB()
        bs[i].bb = make([]int, 1000000)
    }

    time.Sleep(time.Second)
    println("begin gc")
    //for i:=0; i<10; i++ {
    //  bs[i] = nil
    //}
    bs = nil
    runtime.GC()
    time.Sleep(time.Second*2)
    runtime.GC()
    time.Sleep(time.Second*2)
}

First, I set bs = nil, all the two gc infos show 76->76->76 MB, this means gc does not free the memory. Then, I add the for loop code in the slash statement, the first gc info shows 76->76->0 MB, the second gc info shows 0->0->0 MB. So I'm confused that, when I set bs = nil, there is no pointer referenced to all the objects, why gc does not free the objects? should all the objects explicitly set to nil?

2
  • 3
    In Go there is no need to worry about GC. If something is unreachable it will be collected. These types of test for GC just reveal that there might not be any heap alloc at all. There is nothing to learn here. GC works, you can rely on it.
    – Volker
    Jun 7, 2018 at 5:17
  • Also, that's a slice, not an array.
    – thwd
    Jun 7, 2018 at 14:47

1 Answer 1

5

If you compile with escape analysis turned on you'll see that bs doesn't escape and so is allocated on the stack, not the heap

go run -gcflags '-m -l' gc.go
# command-line-arguments
./gc.go:13:12: new(B) escapes to heap
./gc.go:20:18: make([]int, 1000000) escapes to heap
./gc.go:17:15: main make([]*B, 10) does not escape

so although you've nil'd bs the slice that bs was pointing to is still considered live by the gc by virtue of being on the stack. If you push your code down into its own func, and then GC after it returns, you'll see that the GC does reclaim all the memory.

func main() {
    alloc()
    runtime.GC()
    time.Sleep(time.Second * 2)
}

func alloc() {
    var bs = make([]*B, 10)
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        bs[i] = NewB()
        bs[i].bb = make([]int, 1000000)
    }
    time.Sleep(time.Second)
    println("begin gc")
    bs = nil
    runtime.GC()
}



begin gc
gc 5 @1.003s 0%: 0.003+0.052+0.021 ms clock, 0.026+0/0.036/0.055+0.17 ms cpu, 76->76->76 MB, 137 MB goal, 8 P (forced)
gc 6 @1.003s 0%: 0.001+0.037+0.018 ms clock, 0.010+0/0.036/0.023+0.15 ms cpu, 76->76->0 MB, 152 MB goal, 8 P (forced)
3
  • A good thing to learn from this answer is how to write code which will minimize your allocations, esp if you are allocating too much memory this should be carefully dealt with. Thanks @superfell for the insight.
    – Ravi R
    Jun 7, 2018 at 5:58
  • 1
    "considered live by the gc by virtue of being on the stack" - GC only operates on the heap. The GC doesn't consider anything on the stack at all - live, dead, or otherwise.
    – Adrian
    Jun 7, 2018 at 13:25
  • The stack is considered a root by the gc, see the comments in golang.org/src/runtime/mgc.go, which is why the heap allocated things pointed to from the stack aren't gc'd inside the alloc().
    – superfell
    Jun 7, 2018 at 17:42

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