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I am just curious, what is carbon, boron, argon which is used while describing versions of nodejs?

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3 Answers 3

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Actually Node.js provide code name for Long Term Support (LTS) versions.

It started from Argon (version 4.2.0 to 4.9.1). And then it went like Boron (6.9.0 to 6.16.0), Carbon(8.9.0 to 8.15.0) and Dubnium (10.13.0 to 10.15.0). Basically they name their LTS versions under Chemical elements alphabetically:

  • v4 Argon (Ar)
  • v6 Boron (B)
  • v8 Carbon (C)
  • v10 Dubnium (Db)
  • v12 Erbium (Er)
  • v14 Fermium (Fm)
  • v16 Gallium (Ga)
  • v18 Hydrogen (H)

Check here for future releases

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They are the code names for the Nodejs versions (based on chemical names from the periodic table, names are taken alphabetically a, b, c ...), please check below link for more details,

https://nodejs.org/en/about/releases/

Now the second part, Always try to use the stable and latest version (LTS) of Nodejs in production, currently, it is 12.18.3. But for experimenting you can go with the current version and play with new features.

With version 8+ you get async-await support of javascript in Nodejs

Don't bother with the previous version if you are starting new.

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  • Don't bother with the previous version if you are starting new. What do you mean: use a previous version or not if you are new.
    – Timo
    Commented Mar 6, 2021 at 16:56
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    always use the latest LTS version if starting a new project,
    – r7r
    Commented Mar 9, 2021 at 14:58
  • stupid question: why cant we simply have 1 version of node.js in the name of an LTS instead of 10, its sooo confusing for newcomers
    – PirateApp
    Commented Aug 1, 2022 at 5:36
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I don't know if I get your question right, but according to https://nodejs.org/en/blog/release/v8.9.0/, https://nodejs.org/en/blog/release/v6.9.0/, and https://nodejs.org/en/blog/release/v4.2.0/, these are the names of the releases.

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