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Languages like Swift, Vala and C++ (through shared_ptr) manage memory by reference counting. As far as i know updates to the reference count in these systems are performed atomically and thus thread-safe.

However, each time a reference/pointer is reassigned, the former referenced object needs a reference count decrement, the newly referenced object a reference increment, and finally the reference itself must be reassigned. So if the same reference is accessible from multiple threads (i.e. through a global variable) and is reassigned by multiple threads at the same time, reference counts might become garbled.

So do C++ shared pointers, Vala references, Swift references take steps to avoid such problems? If not what steps are necessary in each of the three languages to make such access safe?

Any insights are appreciated. Thanks!

  • 2
    If reference counting wasn't thread safe then reference counting would be a useless feature. – rmaddy Jun 7 '18 at 6:57
  • @rmaddy: true, but like I say in the first paragraph: reference count updates are already thread safe. What I'm asking about is the special corner case where the exactly same reference/pointer is reassigned by multiple threads, i.e. when reassigning a global variable or through a shared_ptr& in C++ – Aiueiia Jun 7 '18 at 7:08
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see the last paragraph of http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/memory/shared_ptr

All member functions (including copy constructor and copy assignment) can be called by multiple threads on different instances of shared_ptr without additional synchronization even if these instances are copies and share ownership of the same object. If multiple threads of execution access the same shared_ptr without synchronization and any of those accesses uses a non-const member function of shared_ptr then a data race will occur; the shared_ptr overloads of atomic functions can be used to prevent the data race.

A shared_ptr variable is not thread safe and shouldn't be accessed from multiple threads if one or more threads modify the variable. Multiple variables managing the same pointer are atomic and each thread is free to modify its own copy of the shared_ptr.

For example this is not safe:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <memory>
#include <vector>
#include <thread>

int main()
{
    std::shared_ptr< std::string > str( new std::string() );
    std::vector< std::thread > threads;
    for ( int i = 0; i < 10; i++ )
    {
        threads.emplace_back([&]
        {
            if ( str->empty() )
            {
                str.reset( new std::string( "thread string" ) );
            }
            else
            {
                str.reset();
            }
        });
    }
    for ( auto& thread : threads )
    {
        thread.join();
    }
}

but this is as the threads don't modify the str variable but do increase its reference count:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <memory>
#include <vector>
#include <thread>

int main()
{
    std::shared_ptr< std::string > str( new std::string() );
    std::vector< std::thread > threads;
    for ( int i = 0; i < 10; i++ )
    {
        threads.emplace_back([&]
        {
            std::shared_ptr< std::string > str2 = str;
            if ( str2->empty() )
            {
                str2.reset( new std::string( "thread string" ) );
            }
            else
            {
                str2.reset();
            }
        });
    }
    for ( auto& thread : threads )
    {
        thread.join();
    }
}

C++20 adds std::atomic_shared_ptr which is completely thread safe. Before that you can use the atomic non member functions.

  • Ah, so in C++ shared_ptr assignment is not thread-safe, but we can use atomic_shared_ptr to make it thread-safe. What about Swift and Vala? – Aiueiia Jun 7 '18 at 7:48
  • @Aiueiia I assume they are similar but this will be stated in their documentation. – Alan Birtles Jun 7 '18 at 8:18
  • For Vala: g_object_ref and g_object_unref are called in the generated C code which use g_atomic_int_add () and friends, see the source code here: gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/glib/blob/master/gobject/gobject.c#L3215 – Jens Mühlenhoff Jun 7 '18 at 8:20
  • This is documented here: developer.gnome.org/glib/stable/… – Jens Mühlenhoff Jun 7 '18 at 8:22
  • @Aiueiia Copy assignment is perfectly safe. It says so - explicitly - in the quote in Alan's answer. Is that what you mean? I notice that some overloads of operator= are not copy assign. Those, according to cppreference, are not threadsafe. – Paul Sanders Jun 7 '18 at 10:47
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Reference counting is threadsafe in Swift, because the underlying NSObject is threadsafe. In that case the reference count is an inherent property of the the object itself so your question is moot. It looks like the same is true of Vala.

Which leaves C++, always late to the ball.

std::shared_ptr's implementation of reference counting is threadsafe, as the quote in Alan's post makes clear, but telling one to start looking after a different object apparently is not.

It is not common to do this. That rather undermines it's purpose, certainly if you're trying it make your code threadsafe. More details at cppreference - some of those overloads of operator= are threadsafe and some are not.

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