1

As typeof(NaN) is a number it's value should be numeric but as per the below code it's not numeric. I want to understand the background process behind below code snippet.

var checkVal = NaN;

if (checkVal > 0) {
  console.log("NaN is greater than 0");
} else {
  console.log("NaN is less than 0");
}

if (checkVal < 0) {
  console.log("NaN is less than 0");
} else {
  console.log("NaN is greater than 0");
}

if (checkVal == 0) {
  console.log("NaN is equal to 0");
} else {
  console.log("NaN is not equal to 0");
}

In above code snippet, In every condition it goes into the else block which makes us confused to know the value of NaN.

As per the Bergi comment, value of NaN is NaN.Hence, checkVal === NaN should be true but it is returning false.

var checkVal = NaN;

if (checkVal === NaN) {
  console.log("true");
} else {
  console.log("false");
}

marked as duplicate by deceze javascript Jun 11 '18 at 7:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 6
    NaN behaves as is documented. Just accept it. It is intentional behaviour. There is no "why" – trincot Jun 9 '18 at 18:48
  • 1
    Please ask a single question per post. – Bergi Jun 9 '18 at 18:49
  • 1
    @Bergi if that is true, then why is NaN == NaN false? apparently, it's not NaN after all. – hanshenrik Jun 9 '18 at 18:51
  • 2
    More importantly: it is required to first look whether your question has been asked before. Very similar questions have been asked before. Look at the links that have been added in the closure reason. – trincot Jun 9 '18 at 18:56
  • 2
    @hanshenrik Being the NaN value does not mean that comparing it to NaN works different from comparing it to other numbers :-) == is only a partial relation on floating point values. – Bergi Jun 9 '18 at 19:54
1

NaN means "Not A Number". It is a special value that denotes the result of a computation that either is impossible (division by zero, f.e.) or cannot be stored using the floating point format. It represents a value that is unknown or cannot be computed (or stored) using the floating point format.

The comparison of NaN with anything else does not make any sense. NaN is not equal even to itself. This happens because it is not a certain value. Being an unknown value, most probably it is not equal to a different unknown value.

Read more in the documenation of NaN.

  • It make sense. Thanks for the explanation. – Rohit Jindal Jun 11 '18 at 8:09

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.