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Hi I usually use conda to manage my environments, but now I am on a project that needs a little more horsepower than my laptop. So I am trying to use my university's workstations which have new Intel Xeons. But I don't have admin rights and the workstation does not have conda so I am forced to work with virtualenv and pip3.

How do I generate a requirements.txt from conda that will work with pip3 and venv?

conda list -e > requirements.txt

does not generate a compatible file:

= is not a valid operator. Did you mean == ?

The conda output is:

# This file may be used to create an environment using:
# $ conda create --name <env> --file <this file>
# platform: osx-64
certifi=2016.2.28=py36_0
cycler=0.10.0=py36_0
freetype=2.5.5=2
icu=54.1=0
libpng=1.6.30=1
matplotlib=2.0.2=np113py36_0
mkl=2017.0.3=0
numpy=1.13.1=py36_0
openssl=1.0.2l=0
pip=9.0.1=py36_1
pyparsing=2.2.0=py36_0
pyqt=5.6.0=py36_2
python=3.6.2=0
python-dateutil=2.6.1=py36_0
pytz=2017.2=py36_0
qt=5.6.2=2
readline=6.2=2
scikit-learn=0.19.0=np113py36_0
scipy=0.19.1=np113py36_0
setuptools=36.4.0=py36_1
sip=4.18=py36_0
six=1.10.0=py36_0
sqlite=3.13.0=0
tk=8.5.18=0
wheel=0.29.0=py36_0
xz=5.2.3=0
zlib=1.2.11=0

I thought I would just manually change all = to == but the there are two = in the conda output. Which one to change? Surely there is an easier way?

EDIT: pip freeze > requirements.txt gives:

certifi==2016.2.28
cycler==0.10.0
matplotlib==2.0.2
matplotlib-venn==0.11.5
numpy==1.13.1
pyparsing==2.2.0
python-dateutil==2.6.1
pytz==2017.2
scikit-learn==0.19.0
scipy==0.19.1
six==1.10.0
  • 2
    you can use 'pip freeze' on your computer – Evgeny Jun 9 '18 at 19:41
  • But the outputs are different, I mean the conda command has more packages than output of pip freeze. – ITA Jun 9 '18 at 19:45
  • that looks a bit strange, but usually you can edit the rewuiremrnts.txt by hand as last resort. another option in pipenv, a wrapper around pip and virtualenv – Evgeny Jun 9 '18 at 19:53
  • 1
    Nope, none if it is working. I find it so strange that this can't be done. Yeah maybe its uncommon for people to switch between environment managers, but still ... the need is conceivable. – ITA Jun 9 '18 at 20:10
  • 2
    I'm not sure, I don't see a full answer; in the sense you have explained what the tools do, but there is no solution as far as I see in how to replicate a conda environment successfully with virtualenv of pipenv. – ITA Jun 17 '18 at 15:11
6

Following the discussion, I'd like to mention that you can actually see some separation of pip and conda roles.

pip is a standard package manager, it does one thing and does it well. requirements.txt can be generated in one environment and installed by pip in a new environment.

Now there is conda output: you rightfully capture their comment which says 'we generated this list of libraries to work with conda'. Note that python itself is in the conda list and (properly) not in requirements.txt. conda replicates own installation, that is why its list of libraries is longer, and has python itself.

pip produces a list of packages that were installed on top of standard library to make the package you wrote work. Hope it helps to distinguish between the two.

Also pipenv is a newer tool, that can do both virtual environment and package management for you.

1

Just in case someone is looking to generate requirements.txt from an existing project in conda, use following

  • Go to your project environment conda activate <env_name>

  • conda list gives you list of packages used for the environment

  • conda list -e > requirements.txt save all the info about packages to your folder

  • conda env export > <env_name>.yml

  • pip freeze

1

As the comment at the top indicates, the output of

conda list -e > requirements.txt

can be used to create a conda virtual environment with

conda create --name <env> --file requirements.txt

but this output isn't in the right format for pip.

If you want a file which you can use to create a pip virtual environment (i.e. a requirements.txt in the right format) you can install pip within the conda environment, the use pip to create requirements.txt.

conda activate <env>
conda install pip
pip freeze > requirements.txt

Then use the resulting requirements.txt to create a pip virtual environment:

python3 -m venv env
source env/bin/activate
pip install -r requirements.txt

When I tested this, the packages weren't identical across the outputs (pip included fewer packages) but it was sufficient to set up a functional environment.

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