5

I have a sorted list of integers and I find want find to the number runs in this list. I have seen many examples when looking for numbers runs that increment by 1, but I also want to look for number runs where the difference between numbers is customizable.

For example, say I have the following list of numbers:

nums = [1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 25, 28, 31, 39]

Using the example found here, I'm able to find the following number runs:

[[1, 2, 3], [6, 7, 8], [10], [12], [14], [18], [25], [28], [31], [39]]

However, I want to look for number runs where the difference between two numbers could be more than just 1. For example, I want all number runs with a distance of less than or equal to 2.

[[1, 2, 3], [6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14], [18], [25], [28], [31], [39]] 

Or maybe I want all number runs with a distance of less than or equal to 3.

[[1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14], [18], [25, 28, 31], [39]]

Here is the function that I'm working with now to get number runs with a distance of 1.

def runs(seq, n):
    result = []
    for s in seq:
        if not result or s != result[-1][-1] + n:
            # Start a new run if we can't continue the previous one.
            result.append([])
        result[-1].append(s)
    return result

With the current function, if I set n=1, then I find all consecutive number sequences. If I set n=2, then I only find [8, 10, 12, 14]. How can I modify this function to find number runs that are less than or equal to n?

I want to be able to do this:

runs(num, 2)
[[1, 2, 3], [6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14], [18], [25], [28], [31], [39]] 
3
  • 3
    Isn't it just s > result[-1][-1] + n instead of s != result[-1][-1] + n? Jun 10 '18 at 3:30
  • 1
    Just wanted to point out that this is a really well written, high quality question, well done! Jun 10 '18 at 3:59
  • I believe your example for <=3 is wrong as in [..., [25, 28], [31], ...], 31 is only a distance of 3 away from 28.
    – AGN Gazer
    Jun 10 '18 at 4:17
7

Iterative grouping with for

I'm just fixing your code with this one. To simplify things, you can initialise result with seq[0].

def runs(seq, n):
    result = [[seq[0]]]
    for s in seq[1:]:
        if s - result[-1][-1] > n:  # Keep it simple. Compare the delta.
            result.append([])
        result[-1].append(s)

    return result

>>> runs(nums, 1)
[[1, 2, 3], [6, 7, 8], [10], [12], [14], [18], [25], [28], [31], [39]]
>>> runs(nums, 2)
[[1, 2, 3], [6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14], [18], [25], [28], [31], [39]]

pandas.GroupBy

If you want to get fancy, you can use the groupby idiom, made easy with pandas.

import pandas as pd

def runs2(seq, n):
    s = pd.Series(seq)
    return s.groupby(s.diff().gt(n).cumsum()).apply(pd.Series.tolist).tolist()

>>> runs2(nums, 3)
[[1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14], [18], [25, 28, 31], [39]]

There are two essential ingredients here: the grouper (the predicate you're grouping on), and the agg function (the function you'll apply on each group)

The grouper is s.diff().gt(n).cumsum(), broken down calculates three things:

  1. The element-wise difference in seq using diff
  2. A boolean mask indicating whether the diff is greater than n
  3. Performing a cumulative sum (or count) to determine the groups

The output of this operation is

s.diff().gt(n).cumsum()

0     0
1     0
2     0
3     1
4     1
5     1
6     1
7     1
8     1
9     2
10    3
11    4
12    5
13    6
dtype: int64

The agg function is pd.Series.tolist, and will convert any series to a list. That's what we need here, a nested list.

2
def runs(nums, n):
    idx = np.flatnonzero(np.ediff1d(nums, n + 1, n + 1) > n)
    return [nums[i1:i2] for i1, i2 in zip(idx[:-1], idx[1:])]

Then,

>>> runs(nums, 3)
[[1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14], [18], [25, 28, 31], [39]]
1
In [4]: def runs(seq, n):
   ...:     indexs = [i for i in range(len(seq)) if i==0 or seq[i]-seq[i-1]>n]
   ...:     return [seq[a:b] for a, b in zip(indexs, indexs[1:]+[len(seq)])]
   ...: 
   ...: 

In [5]: runs(nums, 3)
Out[5]: [[1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14], [18], [25, 28, 31], [39]]

In [6]: runs(nums, 2)
Out[6]: [[1, 2, 3], [6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14], [18], [25], [28], [31], [39]]

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.