1

I'm trying to use linked list to store every line of one big file (from 1 GB to 70 GB), but that's the problem, I can't because it overflows my RAM and forces windows to stop the program execution.

The function I wrote are these:

struct Word {
    char word[13];
};

typedef struct Nodo {
    struct Word word;
    struct Nodo *next;
} TNodo;

typedef TNodo *Nodo;

void NewWord(Nodo *p, struct Word s) {
    Nodo temp;
    temp = (Nodo)malloc(sizeof(TNodo));
    temp->word = s;
    temp->next = *p;
    *p = temp;
}

void LoadList(Nodo *p) {
    FILE *f;
    struct Word s;
    char *buffer = malloc(sizeof(struct Word));

    if (!(f= fopen("wordlist.txt", "r"))) {
        fclose(f);
        exit(1);
    }

    while (fgets(buffer, sizeof(struct Word), f)) {
        if (sscanf(buffer,"%s", s.word) == 1) {
             NewWord(p, s);
        }
    }
    fclose(f);
    free(buffer);
}

Is there a better way to process data (like deleting lines of file) from very large text files without storing them?

the text file I'm trying to read has this simple structure:

Word
Worf
Worg
  • 1
    Copy the file line-by-line, filtering out the lines you wish to delete. – Martin James Jun 10 '18 at 10:22
  • 2
    By using fgets and then sscanf(... "%s" ...) in this way, you are not reading each line in the file; you are reading the first word on each line in the file. – Steve Summit Jun 10 '18 at 10:44
  • 2
    Are you really trying to read a 70 Gb text file? 70,000,000,000 bytes? That's a fantastically large file. Processing files of that size effectively is likely going to require specialized techniques. – Steve Summit Jun 10 '18 at 10:46
  • As written, your LoadList and NewWord functions push each new word onto the head of the list. The list is therefore in reverse order, and if you print it out in order, it will reverse the input file. This is an interesting bit of processing, but it may not be what you want. – Steve Summit Jun 10 '18 at 10:48
  • My previous three comments are relatively minor nits. The big answer, as Martin James has already noted, is that if you're processing a file a line at a time, it's typically far easier (not to mention fantastically more efficient) to read one line, process it, write it out, then move on to read the next line. You can do this in a simple loop. It means you never have the entire file in memory at one time; all you ever have is one line of the file in memory at one time. (This does however mean that your input and output files have to be distinct; you can't edit a file "in place".) – Steve Summit Jun 10 '18 at 10:52
2

As far as I have read, I found the following 2 ways better than others:

1) Read a larger chunk into a large memory buffer, and then parse out the data from that buffer.

2)Another way may be to instead memory map the file, then the OS will put the file into your process virtual memory map, so you can read it like reading from memory.

  • Yet another method is to first split the input into N parts, storing each part on disk, sized so that each will later fit comfortably in memory; then process each part; and finally combine them. This is how external sorting works, and is common approach with huge datasets. – Nominal Animal Jun 10 '18 at 14:33
0

I changed the function according to your answers, now the function NewWord just print the word into a second file, skipping unnecessary words according to the functions step1() and step2().

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#define SIZE 67

char  letters[SIZE] = {'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
                        'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
                        '.','_','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','0','!','@','$'};


struct Word
{
  char word[13];
};



_Bool step1(char * word)
{
for(int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
{
for(int j = 0, c = 0; j < strlen(word); j++)
  {
  if(word[j] == letters[i])
  {
    c++;
    if(c > 3)
    {
      return 1;
    }
  }

  }
}
return 0;

}


_Bool step2(char * word)
{
  for(int i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
  {
  for(int j = 0; j < strlen(word); j++)
    {
    if(word[j] == letters[i] && word[j+1] == letters[i] && word[j+2] == letters[i])
    {
        return 1;
    }

    }
  }
  return 0;


}


void NewWord(FILE *f, struct Word s)
{
if(step1(s.word ) == 1 || step2(s.word) == 1)
 return;

fprintf(f, "%s\n", s.word);

}


void LoadList()
{
  FILE * f1;
  FILE * f2;
 struct Word s;
  char * buffer = malloc(sizeof(struct Word));

  if(!(f1= fopen("wordlist.txt", "r")))
  {
    fclose(f1);
    exit(1);
  }

  if(!(f2 = fopen("bb.txt", "w")))
  {
    fclose(f2);
    exit(1);
  }


 while(fgets(buffer, sizeof(struct Word), f1))
  {
    if(sscanf(buffer,"%s", s.word) == 1)
     {
       NewWord(f2, s);
     }

  }

fclose(f1);
fclose(f2);
free(buffer);

}



int main()
{
 LoadList();

exit(0);
}

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