25

I have setup .net core project and db context also. But i cant start using dbContext yet due this error-

"there is no argument given that corresponds to the required formal parameter 'options'"

Controller:

public IActionResult Index()
{
    using (var db = new BlexzWebDb())
    {

    }
    return View();
}

Dbcontext Code:

public class BlexzWebDb : DbContext
{
    public BlexzWebDb(DbContextOptions<BlexzWebDb> options)
       : base(options)
    { }

    public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Role> Roles { get; set; }
    public DbSet<AssignedRole> AssignedRoles { get; set; }

}

error picture attached. Whats the possible fix for that issue? Thanks in advance

pic

  • @Stefan code added – john Cogdle Jun 10 '18 at 21:44
  • @johnCogdle post code of you data context (BlexzWebDb) – hugo Jun 10 '18 at 21:45
  • 4
    You need to read on Dependency Injection in ASP.NET Core: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/…. What you are attempting to do is fundamentally wrong. – Camilo Terevinto Jun 10 '18 at 21:47
  • DbContext added – john Cogdle Jun 10 '18 at 21:47
  • 2
    @SOusedtobegood It is in no way fundamentally wrong. You don't know the requirements, time or money constraints, quality attributes or anything else required for the project OP is working on for that matter. It is a very valid way of doing things in the right circumstances. Using DI enables many things, true, but even Microsoft doesn't make a problem out of it: Instance pooling can increase throughput in high-scale scenarios such as web servers by re-using DbContext instances, rather than creating new instances for each request. Note that there is no "u r doin it rong" in there. – Zimano Aug 13 '19 at 16:26
38

update

These days the prefered method to add a DbContext to the service collection is to use the AddDbContextPool method:

//hey, options!
//hey, DbContextPool
services.AddDbContextPool<BlexzWebDb>(options => 
       options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("BlexzWebConnection")));

//etc

for more info, see msdn


In EF Core it's common to pass some DbContextOptions to the constructor.

So in general, a constructor looks like this:

public BlexzWebDb(DbContextOptions<BlexzWebDb> options) : base(options)

As you can see there, there is no valid overload in the form of a parameter-less constructor:

Thus, this does not work:

using (var db = new BlexzWebDb())

Instead


.Net Core has IoC implemented in it's roots. Okay, this means; you don't create a context, you ask the framework to give you one, based on some rules you defined before.

Example: somewhere you will register your dbcontext, (Startup.cs):

//typical configuration part of .net core
public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    //some mvc 
    services.AddMvc();

    //hey, options! 
    services.AddDbContextPool<BlexzWebDb>(options => 
           options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("BlexzWebConnection")));
    //...etc

Now the registering part is done, you can retrieve your context from the framework. E.g.: inversion of control through a constructor in your controller:

public class SomeController : Controller
{
    private readonly BlexzWebDb _db;

    //the framework handles this
    public SomeController(BlexzWebDb db)
    {
        _db = db;
    }

    //etc.

why?

So, why not just provide the arguments and new it?

Obviously that will work as well. But, Inversion Of Control is considered to be a good practice. When doing asp dotnet core you should use it quite often because most libraries provide extension methods to use it.

Therefore, instead of providing "just a way to instantiate" the object, I'll try to get you onto the right track - inline with the framework. It will save you some hassle afterwards. Besides, otherwise "use an activator's CreateInstance" would just be as valid as an answer ;-)

Some links:

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Are you awesome! Thanks dude. Very nice and clean described – john Cogdle Jun 10 '18 at 22:18
  • 2
    Be aware that if you go with .AddDbContext<> your entire ioc tree is now exposed to ef (e.g. for things like logging, and starting with Ef 2.1 you can even inject services into models). This may or may not matter to you, but we explicitly opted out of this pattern, for example :) – zaitsman Jun 11 '18 at 1:11
  • 1
    @zaitsman: which makes me wondering; which pattern do you use then? – Stefan Aug 15 '18 at 7:51
  • 1
    Then you can use @hasan 's answer, although it seems the actual parameter-less constructor is missing, you can add it manually. – Stefan Sep 19 '18 at 9:44
  • 1
    @Eutherpy: to ensure that, by the way, is one of the configuration options which are provided by the framework. I don't know the exact method call but every IoC framework has them. So, even in this case I would advise you to use the framework ;-) – Stefan Sep 19 '18 at 9:46
48

Instantiate new object of DbContext from ConnectionString

var connectionstring = "Connection string";

var optionsBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<ApplicationDbContext>();
    optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionstring);


ApplicationDbContext dbContext = new ApplicationDbContext(optionsBuilder.Options);

// Or you can also instantiate inside using

using(ApplicationDbContext dbContext = new ApplicationDbContext(optionsBuilder.Options))
{
   //...do stuff
}
| improve this answer | |
  • How does this answer the question? – Derek Pollard Apr 8 '19 at 16:57
  • 7
    we can instantiate DbContext like this – Qamar Zaman Apr 9 '19 at 7:55
  • 5
    @DerekPollard The OP asked how to instantiate an EF context and this answer shows how to. Since OP specifically did not understand that they had to provide a parameter to that constructor, the answerer has shown how to pass in options as well. – Zimano Aug 13 '19 at 16:20
  • 1
    This should be the correct answer. If you don't want DI, you should not be peer-pressured to do so. – neeohw Apr 20 at 14:06
19

As addition of @Stefan's answer there is another way to achieve this. You can set db connection string in OnConfiguring method of DbContext class without adding DbContext service in startup.cs.

Setting.cs

public static class Setting
{
    public static string ConnectionString { get; set; }
}

Startup.cs

Setting.ConnectionString = Configuration.GetSection("ConnectionStrings:BlexzDbConnection").Value;

BlexzWebDb.cs

public class BlexzWebDb : DbContext 
{
   protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
   {
       if (!optionsBuilder.IsConfigured)
       {
           optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(Setting.ConnectionString);
       }
    }
}

HomeController.cs

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private readonly BlexzWebDb db;

    public HomeController()
    {
        this.db = new BlexzWebDb();
    }

    //etc.
| improve this answer | |
  • Cool way. Didn't know about that! 😉 – JohnyL Sep 22 '19 at 11:54
  • Thanks for the compliment :) – hasan Sep 22 '19 at 14:40
  • 1
    And what about Setting class? 😐 How do you instantiate Configuration, get connection and save to this class? 😐 – JohnyL Sep 23 '19 at 16:11
  • This is the right answer. Adding EntityFrameworkCore and EntityFrameworkCore .SqlServer to the web application breaks DDD principles – Tom McDonough Nov 3 '19 at 19:07

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