I have a class Price that encapsulates an Int. I also would like it to have constructors for Num and Str. I thought I could do this by making Price::new a multi method with various type constraints, but this isn't the behavior I expected. It looks like Price.new is skipping the constructor altogether and going straight to BUILD, bypassing the casting logic.

I know from looking at other Perl 6 code that using multi method new is acceptable. However, I haven't been able to find an example of a polymorphic constructor with different type constraints. How do I rewrite this code to force it to use the casting logic in the constructor?

lib/Price.pm6

#!/usr/bin/env perl6 -w

use v6;

unit class Price:ver<0.0.1>;

class X::Price::PriceInvalid is Exception {
    has $.price;

    method message() {
        return "Price $!price not valid"
    }
}

# Price is stored in cents USD
has $.price;

multi method new(Int $price) {
    say "Int constructor";
    return self.bless(:$price);
}

multi method new(Num $price) {
    say "Num constructor";
    return self.new(Int($price * 100));
}

multi method new(Str $price) {
    say "String constructor";
    $price .= trans(/<-[0..9.]>/ => '');
    unless ($price ~~ m/\.\d**2$/) {
        die(X::Price::PriceInvalid(:$price));
    }
    return self.new(Num($price));
}

submethod BUILD(:$!price) { say "Low-level BUILD constructor" }

method toString() {
    return sprintf("%.2f", ($!price/100));
}

t/price.t

#!/usr/bin/env perl6 -w

use v6;
use Test;

use-ok 'Price', 'Module loads';
use Price;

# test constructor with Int
my Int $priceInt = 12345;
my $priceIntObj = Price.new(price => $priceInt);
is $priceIntObj.toString(), '123.45',
    'Price from Int serializes correctly';

# test constructor with Num
my $priceNum = Num.new(123.45);
my $priceNumObj = Price.new(price => $priceNum);
is $priceNumObj.toString(), '123.45',
    'Price from Num serializes correctly';

# test constructor with Num (w/ extra precision)
my $priceNumExtra = 123.4567890;
my $priceNumExtraObj = Price.new(price => $priceNumExtra);
is $priceNumExtraObj.toString(), '123.45',
    'Price from Num with extra precision serializes correctly';

# test constructor with Str
my $priceStr = '$123.4567890';
my $priceStrObj = Price.new(price => $priceStr);
is $priceStrObj.toString(), '123.45',
    'Price from Str serializes correctly';

# test constructor with invalid Str that doesn't parse
my $priceStrInvalid = 'monkey';
throws-like { my $priceStrInvalidObj = Price.new(price => $priceStrInvalid) }, X::Price::PriceInvalid,
    'Invalid string does not parse';

done-testing;

Output of PERL6LIB=lib/ perl6 t/price.t

ok 1 - Module loads
Low-level BUILD constructor
ok 2 - Price from Int serializes correctly
Low-level BUILD constructor
not ok 3 - Price from Num serializes correctly
# Failed test 'Price from Num serializes correctly'
# at t/price.t line 18
# expected: '123.45'
#      got: '1.23'
Low-level BUILD constructor
not ok 4 - Price from Num with extra precision serializes correctly
# Failed test 'Price from Num with extra precision serializes correctly'
# at t/price.t line 24
# expected: '123.45'
#      got: '1.23'
Low-level BUILD constructor
Cannot convert string to number: base-10 number must begin with valid digits or '.' in '⏏\$123.4567890' (indicated by ⏏)
  in method toString at lib/Price.pm6 (Price) line 39
  in block <unit> at t/price.t line 30
  • 1
    I think you might want to multiply the input by 100 always. – Brad Gilbert Jun 11 at 0:30
up vote 8 down vote accepted

All of the new multi methods that you wrote take one positional argument.

:( Int $ )
:( Num $ )
:( Str $ )

You are calling new with a named argument though

:( :price($) )

The problem is that since you didn't write one that would accept that, it uses the default new that Mu provides.


If you don't want to allow the built-in new, you could write a proto method to prevent it from searching up the inheritance chain.

proto method new (|) {*}

If you want you could also use it to ensure that all potential sub-classes also follow the rule about having exactly one positional parameter.

proto method new ($) {*}

If you want to use named parameters, use them.

multi method new (Int :$price!){…}

You might want to leave new alone and use multi submethod BUILD instead.

multi submethod BUILD (Int :$!price!) {
    say "Int constructor";
}

multi submethod BUILD (Num :$price!) {
    say "Num constructor";
    $!price = Int($price * 100); 
}

multi submethod BUILD (Str :$price!) {
    say "String constructor";
    $price .= trans(/<-[0..9.]>/ => '');
    unless ($price ~~ m/\.\d**2$/) {
        die(X::Price::PriceInvalid(:$price));
    }
    $!price = Int($price * 100);
}

Actually I would always multiply the input by 100, so that 1 would be the same as "1" and 1/1 and 1e0.
I would also divide the output by 100 to get a Rat.

unit class Price:ver<0.0.1>;

class X::Price::PriceInvalid is Exception {
    has $.price;

    method message() {
        return "Price $!price not valid"
    }
}

# Price is stored in cents USD
has Int $.price is required;

method price () {
    $!price / 100; # return a Rat
}

# Real is all Numeric values except Complex
multi submethod BUILD ( Real :$price ){
    $!price = Int($price * 100);
}

multi submethod BUILD ( Str :$price ){
    $price .= trans(/<-[0..9.]>/ => '');
    unless ($price ~~ m/\.\d**2$/) {
        X::Price::PriceInvalid(:$price).throw;
    }
    $!price = Int($price * 100);
}

method Str() {
    return sprintf("%.2f", ($!price/100));
}
  • Thank you, I was able to unstick this by using named parameters and overloading BUILD. – wbn Jun 11 at 8:08

The new methods are being declared as taking a positional parameter:

multi method new(Int $price) {
    say "Int constructor";
    return self.bless(:$price);
}

But then being called as Price.new(price => $priceInt), which is passing a named argument. Therefore, since all of the multi candidates that wish for the extra positional argument are not applicable.

The most immediate fix is to change the constructor calls to Price.new($priceInt) instead.

Another option is to write the new methods as multi method new(Int :$price) { ... }, noting that the return self.new(Int($price * 100)); would need to become return self.new(price => Int($price * 100)); to fit with that change.

A few other assorted notes about the code that may be helpful:

  • The new method is is normally overridden to change the interface to construction (such as accepting positional parameters instead of named ones), while BUILD and TWEAK are used to control how the values are mapped to attributes. If you choose to have the new methods take named parameters, it may also be better to handle the coercion login inside of BUILD.
  • In Perl 6, Num is a floating point number, while Rat is a rational number (stored as integer numerator and denominator). A literal 123.4567890 is not Num, but rather a Rat. A Num literal always has an e exponent part (like 123.45e1). However, since the problem here is dealing with currency, Rat is actually the correct choice, so I'd change the code to use the Rat type, not Num, and leave the literal as is.
  • The toString method would be more naturally named Str in Perl 6. Types define how they coerce into other things by writing a method with that type name. Calling it Str will mean that it will automatically be called if a Price instance is interpolated in a string, or used with the ~ prefix operator.
  • An exception needs to be constructed, so die(X::Price::PriceInvalid(:$price)); should be die(X::Price::PriceInvalid.new(:$price));.

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