How do you perform a String replace_at in Elixir or Erlang?

For example given this fixed width file:

EmployeeFundMappingID EmployeeID  FundID      IsActive EntryDate               ExitDate                ExitTypeID  DateCreated             CreatedByID DateModified            ModifiedByID ConfirmedBy DateConfirmed           GUID                                     IsPooled DatePooled
1                     1118544     1           1        2009-04-20 00:00:00.000 NULL                    NULL        2014-05-17 08:46:48.020 1           2014-10-30 13:34:47.177 NULL         1           2009-04-20 17:48:12.067 NULL                                     NULL     NULL
2                     1027350     1           1        2008-03-03 00:00:00.000 NULL                    NULL        2014-05-17 08:46:48.020 1           2014-10-30 13:34:47.177 NULL         1           2008-05-04 15:13:30.303 NULL                                     NULL     NULL
3                     1024795     1           1        2008-02-29 00:00:00.000 NULL                    NULL        2014-05-17 08:46:48.020 1           2014-10-30 13:34:47.177 NULL         1           2008-05-04 15:13:30.303 NULL                                     NULL     NULL
4                     1116497     1           1        2009-03-24 00:00:00.000 NULL                    NULL        2014-05-17 08:46:48.020 1           2014-10-30 13:34:47.177 NULL         1           2009-03-24 13:00:15.277 NULL                                     NULL     NULL
5                     1116569     1           1        2009-03-24 00:00:00.000 NULL                    NULL        2014-05-17 08:46:48.020 1           2014-10-30 13:34:47.177 NULL         1           2009-03-24 14:43:08.280 NULL                                     NULL     NULL
6                     1116920     1           1        2009-03-27 00:00:00.000 NULL                    NULL        2014-05-17 08:46:48.020 1           2014-10-30 13:34:47.177 NULL         1           2009-03-27 17:16:35.073 NULL                                     NULL     NULL

with col positions at:

[0, 22, 34, 46, 55, 79, 103, 115, 139, 151, 175, 188, 200, 224, 265, 274]

How do we replace \s with \t at each col positions?

I'm effectively trying to convert a Fixed-Width file into a csv

  • Have you tried String.replace/4? It can use regex to replace the spaces with commas. – Abhyudit Jain Jun 11 at 10:13
  • @AbhyuditJain, the spaces are at specific locations. How would that work? – Charles Okwuagwu Jun 11 at 10:15
  • 1
    String.replace(data, ~r{ +}, ",") – Abhyudit Jain Jun 11 at 10:16
  • @AbhyuditJain Thanks. this works, but it splits on date-time – Charles Okwuagwu Jun 11 at 10:20
  • I didn't notice the space there. It's going to be a tricky regex to figure out. – Abhyudit Jain Jun 11 at 10:24
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would go with reducing the original lines with a set of functions changing respective positions in the string.

funs =
  [22, 34, 46, 55, 79, 103, 115, 139, 151, 175, 188, 200, 224, 265, 274]
  |> Enum.map(& &1 - 1)
  |> Enum.map(fn len ->
       fn <<s :: binary-size(len), " ", rest :: binary>> ->
         s <> "\t" <> rest
       end
     end)

input
|> String.trim
|> String.split("\n")
|> Enum.map(fn line ->
     Enum.reduce(funs, line, fn fun, acc -> fun.(acc) end)
   end)

That might be done in a more elegant way using generated macros, once per a position, and recursive calls, but reducing on function list looks more straightforward to me here.


The advantage of this approach would be that it immediately fails on any inconsistent data, assuring (more or less) that if it passed, the conversion was done properly, unlike all others shorter solutions.

Also it’s drastically faster than any Regex solution.


Since this is to be applied to 16M rows, here is the probably most performant version, that matches the whole row at once:

input
|> String.trim
|> String.split("\n")
|> Enum.map(
     # [22, 34, 46, 55, 79, 103,
     #  115, 139, 151, 175, 188,
     #  200, 224, 265, 274]
     # note: this assumes the listed positions above are 1-based
     fn <<
        c1 :: binary-size(21),
        " ",
        c2 :: binary-size(11),
        " ",
        c3 :: binary-size(11),
        " ",
        c4 :: binary-size(8),
        " ",
        c5 :: binary-size(23),
        " ",
        c6 :: binary-size(23),
        " ",
        c7 :: binary-size(11),
        " ",
        c8 :: binary-size(23),
        " ",
        c9 :: binary-size(11),
        " ",
        c10 :: binary-size(23),
        " ",
        c11 :: binary-size(12),
        " ",
        c12 :: binary-size(11),
        " ",
        c13 :: binary-size(23),
        " ",
        c14 :: binary-size(40),
        " ",
        c15 :: binary-size(8),
        " ",
        c16 :: binary
        >> ->
     c1 <> "\t" <> 
       c2 <> "\t" <> 
       c3 <> "\t" <> 
       c4 <> "\t" <> 
       c5 <> "\t" <> 
       c6 <> "\t" <> 
       c7 <> "\t" <> 
       c8 <> "\t" <> 
       c9 <> "\t" <> 
       c10 <> "\t" <> 
       c11 <> "\t" <> 
       c12 <> "\t" <> 
       c13 <> "\t" <> 
       c14 <> "\t" <> 
       c15 <> "\t" <> 
       c16
   end)
  • I was wondering when you'd answer. – Abhyudit Jain Jun 11 at 12:11
  • The issue with this is it's not converting it into csv – Abhyudit Jain Jun 11 at 12:20
  • 1
    @AbhyuditJain excuse me? CSV perfectly accepts "\t" as column separators. If you want comma-separation, change "\t" in s <> "\t" <> rest to whatever you want. – Aleksei Matiushkin Jun 11 at 12:22
  • 1
    I have updated the answer with the probably most performant version; do a benchmark if you need to know what is better exactly, but I am pretty sure 16M lines should be processed fine with both versions. – Aleksei Matiushkin Jun 11 at 18:24
  • 1
    @mudasobwa it works fine, was done in 3 minutes – Charles Okwuagwu Jun 12 at 10:02

What you can do is join the date-time first and then replace all the spaces with commas and then revert the date-time to original format:

data
|> String.replace(~r/(-\d+)([\s]{1})(\d+)/, "\\1T\\3")
|> String.replace(~r/ +/, ",")
|> String.replace(~r/(\d)(T)(\d)/, "\\1 \\3")

Comparing two implementations on a dataset with over 16M rows:

  def flat2csv1(src, dst) do
    Logger.info("START")

    t = System.system_time(:millisecond)

    funs =
      [12, 52, 76]
      |> Enum.map(&(&1 - 1))
      |> Enum.map(fn len ->
        fn <<s::binary-size(len), " ", rest::binary>> ->
          s <> "\t" <> rest
        end
      end)

    File.stream!(src)
    |> Enum.map(fn line ->
      Enum.reduce(funs, line, fn fun, acc -> fun.(acc) end)
    end)
    |> write(dst)

    log_elapsed("DONE", t)
  end

  def flat2csv0(src, dst) do
    Logger.info("START")

    t = System.system_time(:millisecond)

    File.stream!(src)
    |> Enum.map(fn <<
                     c1::binary-size(11),
                     " ",
                     c2::binary-size(39),
                     " ",
                     c3::binary-size(23),
                     " ",
                     ce::binary
                   >> ->
      c1 <> "\t" <> c2 <> "\t" <> c3 <> "\t" <> ce
    end)
    |> write(dst)

    log_elapsed("DONE", t)
  end

  defp log_elapsed(s, t) do
    t = System.system_time(:millisecond) - t
    Logger.debug("#{s}: #{t} ms")
  end

  defp write(s, dst) do
    File.write!(dst, s, [:append])
  end

Results

# flat2csv0
11:40:25.055 [info] START
11:42:26.028 [info] DONE: 120969 ms

# flat2csv1
11:45:17.521 [info] START
11:48:25.433 [info] DONE: 187906 ms
  • 1
    Wow. I always respected Erlang VM binary pattern match optimizations but I could not imagine they are as incredibly great.—Thank you! – Aleksei Matiushkin Jun 12 at 10:58

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.