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In an OOP program, where would I put functions for basic operations?

For example, if I had a class that, in one of the functions needed code that could invert an array, I could just make a method called invertArray() within the class.

On the other hand, I could create a whole new Functions class, where I could dump all these basic functions like inverting an array into. However, with this approach, I would have to instantiate this class in pretty much every other class I use. In addition, it isn't really an "object," but more of a conglomeration of functions that don't belong anywhere else, which kind of defeats the purpose of "object-oriented" programming.

Which implementation is better? Is there a better implementation I should use?

Thanks in advance.

Edit: Should this kind of post even belong in Stack Overflow? If not, could you please guide me to a more appropriate Stack Exchange website? Thanks.

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    It may be better suited for software engineering since it's an opinion based or philosophical question more than a programming problem. – that other guy Jun 11 '18 at 23:26
  • The answer will be similar depending on the language but what language are you referring to? This will help with code examples and should be included in the tags if possible. But to answer in a comment there are various approaches but you would most likely want a static (C#) or final (JAVA) or Module (VB.NET) etc type class. Name the class something like ArrayHelper or the likes and then make the methods static (C# and JAVA) Shared (VB.NET) etc. This initializes the class only once and is used globally so to speak. Look up those keywords and you'll learn more. – Michael Puckett II Jun 11 '18 at 23:28
  • @MichaelPuckettII Oh thanks. For some reason, I never realized that I did not have to instantiate a class to use a static method in it. Thanks for the answer! (I use Java by the way, updated the tags) – Frank Jun 11 '18 at 23:42
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Depending on your language it can depend where you put things.

However, given your an example, an invertArray lives on an Array class. In some languages you might make an ArrayHelper or ArrayExtension class. But the principle is "invert" is something you want to tell an array.

You will generally find all your functions will generally live somewhere on some class and there will be a logical place for them.

It's generally not a good idea to make a class that holds a mishmash of functions. You can end up with things like "Math" which is a bunch of "static" functions ( they don't work on an object ) they simply do some calculation with parameters and return a result. But they are still grouped by the idea they are common mathmatical functions

  • So if I use java, I would go java.util.Arrays, and add an invertArray() function? – Frank Jun 11 '18 at 23:38
  • not sure what you'd do in Java – Keith Nicholas Jun 12 '18 at 0:08
  • You can't modify java.util.Arrays, since Java classes are closed. In Java, the traditional approach would be, as was alluded to in the answer, to make a decorator object (ArrayHelper, etc) which contains an array and defines the new method you want. – Silvio Mayolo Jun 12 '18 at 0:15
  • What do you mean by ArrayHelper containing an array? Would that mean instead of creating an array, you would create an ArrayHelper (which would retain the array properties) instead? – Frank Jun 12 '18 at 1:01
  • @Frank i think that Silvio meant something like. int[] x = ...; int[] xInverted = new DecoratedArray(x).invert().toPlainArray(); the idea would be that your decorated array would be a thin wrapper around a plain array. Message like invert could return another decorated array, or a plain array, and could give you methods to get back to a plain array. – Joshua Taylor Jun 12 '18 at 2:02
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As per your question is regarding Java:

if I had a class that, in one of the functions needed code that could invert an array, I could just make a method called invertArray() within the class.

Then yes you can do this, but if you are willing to implement OOPS concept in Java the you can also do :

I could create a whole new Functions class, where I could dump all these basic functions like inverting an array into.

For this part :

I would have to instantiate this class in pretty much every other class I use.

You can also create an interface as Java provides you this functionality where in you can just declare you functions and provide its implementation in their respective classes. This is also helpful if in case you want different functionality with same function then you can choose this way and you don't have to rewrite your function definitions again and again.

And, OOPS concept comes handy when your are dealing with big projects with n number of classes. It depends whether you are learning or implementing on projects.

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