I've found a lot of this sort of thing when refactoring our Jest test suites:

it('calls the API and throws an error', async () => {
  expect.assertions(2);
  try {
    await login('email', 'password');
  } catch (error) {
    expect(error.name).toEqual('Unauthorized');
    expect(error.status).toEqual(401);
  }
});

I believe the expect.assertions(2) line is redundant here, and can safely be removed, because we already await the async call to login().

Am I correct, or have I misunderstood how expect.assertions works?

up vote 2 down vote accepted

expect.assertions is important when testing the errror scenarios of asyncronous code and is not redundant.

If you remove expect.assertions from your example you can't be confident that login did in fact throw the error.

it('calls the API and throws an error', async () => {
  try {
    await login('email', 'password');
  } catch (error) {
    expect(error.name).toEqual('Unauthorized');
    expect(error.status).toEqual(401);
  }
});

Let's say someone changes the behaviour of login to throw an error based on some other logic, or somoene has affected the mock for this test which no longer causes login to throw. The assertions in the catch block won't run but the test will still pass.

Using expect.assertions at the start of the test ensures that if the assertions inside the catch don't run, we get a failure.

This is from Jest documentation:

Expect.assertions(number) verifies that a certain number of assertions are called during a test. This is often useful when testing asynchronous code, in order to make sure that assertions in a callback actually got called.

So to put in other words, expect.assertions makes sure that the n number of assertions are made by the time when test is run.

It's good to use it especially when writing a new tests, so one can easily check that correct assertions are made during the test. Async test easily pass because the intended assertions were not made before test thought it was ready.

If you are feeling confident that your test works as intended, they can most certainly be removed.

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