I was trying this and a few other things but it truncates the file each time:

my $file = 'primes.txt';
sub MAIN ( Int:D $low, Int:D $high where * >= $low ) {
    unless my $fh = open $file, :w, :append {
        die "Could not open '$file': {$fh.exception}";
    }

    for $low .. $high {
        $fh.put: $_ if .is-prime;
    }
}

Changing this to open $file, :a also seems to truncate the file. This is 2018.04 on macOS.

  • 2
    From the documentation: :w same as specifying :mode<wo>, :create, :truncate. So behavior exactly up to spec. When you specify :w, :append is dropped in favor of :truncate. Use :a instead of :w :append – jjmerelo Jun 12 at 16:09
  • 1
    I see the same problem with :a though. – brian d foy Jun 12 at 16:12
  • 3
    If Perl 6 is going to ignore something you pass, it should warn you about it. – brian d foy Jun 12 at 16:13
  • 1
    sorry, but I don't see the problem (using 2018.04). perl6 append-file.p6 1 20 , the file contains: 2 3 5 7 11 13 17 19 Then perl6 append-file.p6 200 300and it appends 19 211 223 227 229 233 239 241 251 257 263 269 271 277 281 283 293 (I include the 19 here) With respect to ignoring something, well, that's a different piece of cloth altogether. Maybe raising an exception or a warning causes more confusion. – jjmerelo Jun 12 at 16:17
  • 1
    plain old open $file, :a should not truncate, and does not on the Perl6 version I built last month (though I'm on Windows, not MacOS). – Christoph Jun 13 at 18:22

Perl6 &open semantics are based on POSIX, with the following mapping:

:mode<ro>  --> O_RDONLY
:mode<wo>  --> O_WRONLY
:mode<rw>  --> O_RDWR
:create    --> O_CREAT
:append    --> O_APPEND
:truncate  --> O_TRUNC
:exclusive --> O_EXCL

For convenience, the following shortcuts are provided:

:r      --> :mode<ro>
:w      --> :mode<wo>, :create, :truncate
:x      --> :mode<wo>, :create, :exclusive
:a      --> :mode<wo>, :create, :append
:update --> :mode<rw>
:rw     --> :mode<rw>, :create
:rx     --> :mode<rw>, :create, :exclusive
:ra     --> :mode<rw>, :create, :append

Not all platforms supported by Rakudo (eg Windows, JVM, not even POSIX itself) support all possible combinations of modes and flags, so only the combinations above are guaranteed to behave as expected (or are at least supposed to behave that way).

Long story short, a simple :a absolutely should do what you want it to do, and it does so on my Windows box. If it really truncates on MacOS, I'd consider that a bug.

Using :mode<wo>, :append works although this wouldn't be the first thing most people are going to reach for when they see :a:

my $file = 'primes.txt';
sub MAIN ( Int:D $low, Int:D $high where * >= $low ) {
    unless my $fh = open $file, :mode<wo>, :append {
        die "Could not open '$file': {$fh.exception}";
        }

    for $low .. $high {
        $fh.put: $_ if .is-prime;
        }

    $fh.close;
    }

The problem is that Perl 6 tends to silently ignore named parameters. It also looks like roast/open.t doesn't actually test this stuff through the user interface. It plays various tricks that should probably be unrefactored.

  • 1
    FYI: While the combination :mode<wo>, :append makes sense to me given the doc definitions of :mode<wo> and :append, I noticed that the doc for the open routine says it calls the open method on an IO::Handle and the doc for the latter says that "Support for combinations of modes other than what is listed above ... might work or might cause the Universe to implode". The combination :mode<wo>, :append is not listed above that sentence. So it might work today but not tomorrow. – raiph Jun 12 at 21:40
  • 1
    @raiph That link is in reference to methods, but isn't open here a subroutine? Don't subroutines care about extra named arguments (unlike methods)? – Christopher Bottoms Jun 13 at 15:10
  • @ChristopherBottoms: &open is implemented as multi sub open(IO() $path, |c) { IO::Handle.new(:$path).open(|c) }, passing th arguments through to th method... – Christoph Jun 13 at 18:26
  • 2
    @raiph: the P6 open modes are based on POSIX semantics; the problem is that those are almost, but not quite fully supported on Windows and the JVM – Christoph Jun 13 at 21:27
  • 1
    Hi brian. Presuming your last comment is a response to mine... Indeed. I think that distinction is critically important. It remains unclear to me if you disagree with or misunderstand or don't care about the interface consistency principle (a Larry / Perl 6 design thing) or Rakudo's current lack of warning about non-use of named arguments (a tuit / implementation deficit thing) or that it's important to distinguish between them. Interface consistency is often inappropriately maligned. Your comment about "the problem" seems to blame the principle, not Rakudo, or not care about the difference. – raiph Jun 14 at 7:18

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