-2
#include<stdio.h>
int main(){

        int n;
        printf("%d\n",scanf("%d",&n));
        return 0;
}

I wonder why the output of this program is always '1' ?! What's actually happening here ?

  • 4
    scanf returns a value from the function: the number of items converted, as the man page will tell you. The man page should be your first stop with any function you use. – Weather Vane Jun 12 '18 at 17:25
  • 1
    You did not read anything on scanf(), did you? en.cppreference.com/w/c/io/fscanf – Yunnosch Jun 12 '18 at 17:27
  • 1
    What answer do you get when you type in a non-digit character? – John Bode Jun 12 '18 at 17:34

10 Answers 10

1

@jishnu, good question and the output which you're getting is also correct as you are only reading one value from standard input (stdin).

scanf() reads the values supplied from standard input and return number of values successfully read from standard input (keyboard).

In C, printf() returns the number of characters successfully written on the output and scanf() returns number of items successfully read. Visit https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/g-fact-10/ and read more about it.

Have a look at the following 2 code samples.

Try the below code online at http://rextester.com/HNJE76121. //clang 3.8.0

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){

    int n, n2;
    printf("%d\n",scanf("%d%d",&n, &n2));   //2
    return 0;
}

In your code, scanf() is reading only 1 value from the keyboad (stdin), that is why output is 1.

//clang 3.8.0

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){

    int n;
    printf("%d\n",scanf("%d",&n));   //1
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
4

I suspect you wanted to use

int n;
scanf("%d", &n);
printf("%d\n", n);

but what you wrote is equivalent to

int n;
int num = scanf("%d", &n); // num is the number of successful reads.
printf("%d\n", num);
| improve this answer | |
  • The intention of my question was just to know the reason behind the result as I encountered such an objective question in a book...Thank you – leet101 Jun 12 '18 at 17:36
  • 2
    @jishnupramod, If I were you, I would drop that book. A book should teach principles and fundamental aspects of the language. Using questions like that is what I call "smart-assery". It's not teaching. – R Sahu Jun 12 '18 at 17:41
2

The program is just about exactly equivalent to

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int n;
    int r = scanf("%d", &n);
    printf("%d\n", r);
    return 0;
}

So if you run this program, and if you type (say) 45, then scanf will read the 45, and assign it to n, and return 1 to tell you it has done so. The program prints the value 1 returned by scanf (which is not the number read by scanf!).

Try running the program and typing "A", instead. In that case scanf should return, and your program should print, 0.

Finally, if you can, try running the program and giving it no input at all. If you're on Unix, Mac, or Linux, try typing control-D immediately after running your program (that is, without typing anything else), or run it with the input redirected:

myprog < /dev/null

On Windows, you might be able to type control-Z (perhaps followed by the Return key) to generate an end-of-file conditions. In any of these cases, scanf should return, and your program should print, -1.

| improve this answer | |
1

In your program scanf returns 1 when successfully some value is taken by scanf into n and that is why you are always getting 1 from your printf("%d\n",scanf("%d",&n));. You should modify your code like following

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){

        int n;
        scanf("%d",&n);
        printf("%d\n",n);
        return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • The intention of my question was just to know the reason behind the result...Thank you – leet101 Jun 12 '18 at 17:33
1

In man scanf,

Return Value

These functions return the number of input items successfully matched and assigned, which can be fewer than provided for, or even zero in the event of an early matching failure.

In your program, it just match 1 input, so the function scanf will return 1, if you input an legal value that can match a %d, else it will return 0.

In your situation, you might always satisfy this requirements, so it always return 1.

| improve this answer | |
  • The input format spec is %d. If an integer cannot be extracted from the input, scanf returns 0 - that is what the return value is for. That is not "always 1". – Weather Vane Jun 12 '18 at 17:31
  • @WeatherVane I assumed that the author of question will always input a legal %d... It's my mistake, thank you. – Geno Chen Jun 12 '18 at 17:35
  • 1
    Yes, the purpose of the return value is to detect if user did not enter a value that can be converted to the type. – Weather Vane Jun 12 '18 at 17:36
1

scanf returns the number of successful conversion and assignments. In your case, you're only scanning for one argument, so scanf will either return a 1 on success, a 0 on a matching failure (where the first non-whitespace input character is not a decimal digit), or EOF on end-of-file or error.

When you call printf, each of its arguments is evaluated and the result is passed to the function. In this case, evaluation involves calling the scanf function. The value returned by scanf is then passed to printf.

It's essentially the same as writing

int count = scanf( "%d", &n );
printf( "%d\n", count );

For giggles, see what happens when you enter abc or type CtrlD (or CtrlZ on Windows).

Note that printf also returns a value (the number of bytes written to the stream), so you can write something ridiculous1 like

printf( "num bytes printed = %d\n", printf( "num items read = %d\n", scanf( "%d", &n ) ) );


  1. Joke. Don't do that.

| improve this answer | |
1

scanf returns number of successful conversions. Try changing your scanf to as shown below.... you will notice printing 2 after inputting two valid integers.

int n1 =0;
int n2 =0;
int i = scanf("%d %d",&n1,&n2);
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    A more accurate term is "successful conversions". – Ctx Jun 12 '18 at 17:49
  • True. I will change it. – Pavan Chandaka Jun 12 '18 at 18:38
0

The documentation of scanf() says the return value is:

Number of receiving arguments successfully assigned (which may be zero in case a matching failure occurred before the first receiving argument was assigned), or EOF if input failure occurs before the first receiving argument was assigned.

The code you would instead want is:

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){

    int n;
    scanf("%d",&n);
    printf("%d\n",scanf("%d",&n));
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • The intention of my question was just to know the reason behind the result...Thank you – leet101 Jun 12 '18 at 17:33
0

If you use this code as an example, It shows : warning: implicit declaration of function 'printf' [-Wimplicit-function declaration]

int main()
{
char b[40]; 
printf(" %d", scanf("%s", b));
getchar();
} 

Return value : -1

Outputs of the functions like printf and scanf can be use as a parameter to another function.

| improve this answer | |
  • You mean "Return values", not "Outputs". What you are trying to say with the implicit-declaration-warning is unclear to me. – Ctx Jun 12 '18 at 21:54
  • Yeah, It’s the return value ! – Sachin Liyanage Jun 13 '18 at 3:56
0

scanf() is a function which is integer return type function. It returns total number of conversion characters in it. For ex if a statement is written as :

int c;
c=scanf("%d %d %d");
printf("%d",c);

Then output of this program will be 3. This is because scanf() is integer return type function and it returns total no of conversion characters, thus being 3 conversion characters it will return 3 to c. So in your code scanf() returns 1 to printf() and thus output of program is 1. This is because if more than one statement are used in printf() execution orders starts from right to left. Thus scanf() is executed first followed by printf().

| improve this answer | |

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