On most websites, when the user is about to provide the username and password to log into the system, there's a checkbox like "Stay logged in". If you check the box, it will keep you logged in across all sessions from the same web browser. How can I implement the same in Java EE?

I'm using FORM based container managed authentication with a JSF login page.

<security-constraint>
    <display-name>Student</display-name>
    <web-resource-collection>
        <web-resource-name>CentralFeed</web-resource-name>
        <description/>
        <url-pattern>/CentralFeed.jsf</url-pattern>
    </web-resource-collection>        
    <auth-constraint>
        <description/>
        <role-name>STUDENT</role-name>
        <role-name>ADMINISTRATOR</role-name>
    </auth-constraint>
</security-constraint>
 <login-config>
    <auth-method>FORM</auth-method>
    <realm-name>jdbc-realm-scholar</realm-name>
    <form-login-config>
        <form-login-page>/index.jsf</form-login-page>
        <form-error-page>/LoginError.jsf</form-error-page>
    </form-login-config>
</login-config>
<security-role>
    <description>Admin who has ultimate power over everything</description>
    <role-name>ADMINISTRATOR</role-name>
</security-role>    
<security-role>
    <description>Participants of the social networking Bridgeye.com</description>
    <role-name>STUDENT</role-name>
</security-role>
up vote 102 down vote accepted

Java EE 8 and up

If you're on Java EE 8 or newer, put @RememberMe on a custom HttpAuthenticationMechanism along with a RememberMeIdentityStore.

@ApplicationScoped
@AutoApplySession
@RememberMe
public class CustomAuthenticationMechanism implements HttpAuthenticationMechanism {

    @Inject
    private IdentityStore identityStore;

    @Override
    public AuthenticationStatus validateRequest(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, HttpMessageContext context) {
        Credential credential = context.getAuthParameters().getCredential();

        if (credential != null) {
            return context.notifyContainerAboutLogin(identityStore.validate(credential));
        }
        else {
            return context.doNothing();
        }
    }
}

public class CustomIdentityStore implements RememberMeIdentityStore {

    @Inject
    private UserService userService; // This is your own EJB.

    @Inject
    private LoginTokenService loginTokenService; // This is your own EJB.

    @Override
    public CredentialValidationResult validate(RememberMeCredential credential) {
        Optional<User> user = userService.findByLoginToken(credential.getToken());
        if (user.isPresent()) {
            return new CredentialValidationResult(new CallerPrincipal(user.getEmail()));
        }
        else {
            return CredentialValidationResult.INVALID_RESULT;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public String generateLoginToken(CallerPrincipal callerPrincipal, Set<String> groups) {
        return loginTokenService.generateLoginToken(callerPrincipal.getName());
    }

    @Override
    public void removeLoginToken(String token) {
        loginTokenService.removeLoginToken(token);
    }

}

You can find a real world example in the Java EE Kickoff Application.


Java EE 6/7

If you're on Java EE 6 or 7, homegrow a long-living cookie to track the unique client and use the Servlet 3.0 API provided programmatic login HttpServletRequest#login() when the user is not logged-in but the cookie is present.

This is the easiest to achieve if you create another DB table with a java.util.UUID value as PK and the ID of the user in question as FK.

Assume the following login form:

<form action="login" method="post">
    <input type="text" name="username" />
    <input type="password" name="password" />
    <input type="checkbox" name="remember" value="true" />
    <input type="submit" />
</form>

And the following in doPost() method of a Servlet which is mapped on /login:

String username = request.getParameter("username");
String password = hash(request.getParameter("password"));
boolean remember = "true".equals(request.getParameter("remember"));
User user = userService.find(username, password);

if (user != null) {
    request.login(user.getUsername(), user.getPassword()); // Password should already be the hashed variant.
    request.getSession().setAttribute("user", user);

    if (remember) {
        String uuid = UUID.randomUUID().toString();
        rememberMeService.save(uuid, user);
        addCookie(response, COOKIE_NAME, uuid, COOKIE_AGE);
    } else {
        rememberMeService.delete(user);
        removeCookie(response, COOKIE_NAME);
    }
}

(the COOKIE_NAME should be the unique cookie name, e.g. "remember" and the COOKIE_AGE should be the age in seconds, e.g. 2592000 for 30 days)

Here's how the doFilter() method of a Filter which is mapped on restricted pages could look like:

HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) req;
HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) res;
User user = request.getSession().getAttribute("user");

if (user == null) {
    String uuid = getCookieValue(request, COOKIE_NAME);

    if (uuid != null) {
        user = rememberMeService.find(uuid);

        if (user != null) {
            request.login(user.getUsername(), user.getPassword());
            request.getSession().setAttribute("user", user); // Login.
            addCookie(response, COOKIE_NAME, uuid, COOKIE_AGE); // Extends age.
        } else {
            removeCookie(response, COOKIE_NAME);
        }
    }
}

if (user == null) {
    response.sendRedirect("login");
} else {
    chain.doFilter(req, res);
}

In combination with those cookie helper methods (too bad they are missing in Servlet API):

public static String getCookieValue(HttpServletRequest request, String name) {
    Cookie[] cookies = request.getCookies();
    if (cookies != null) {
        for (Cookie cookie : cookies) {
            if (name.equals(cookie.getName())) {
                return cookie.getValue();
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}

public static void addCookie(HttpServletResponse response, String name, String value, int maxAge) {
    Cookie cookie = new Cookie(name, value);
    cookie.setPath("/");
    cookie.setMaxAge(maxAge);
    response.addCookie(cookie);
}

public static void removeCookie(HttpServletResponse response, String name) {
    addCookie(response, name, null, 0);
}

Although the UUID is extremely hard to brute-force, you could provide the user an option to lock the "remember" option to user's IP address (request.getRemoteAddr()) and store/compare it in the database as well. This makes it a tad more robust. Also, having an "expiration date" stored in the database would be useful.

It's also a good practice to replace the UUID value whenever the user has changed its password.


Java EE 5 or below

Please, upgrade.

  • 1
    Yes, it is and it logs in the user the same way as j_security_check does. This is new in Servlet 3.0. See also "Programmatic login" in JEE6 tutorial: download.oracle.com/javaee/6/tutorial/doc/gjiie.html – BalusC Feb 24 '11 at 1:52
  • 2
    It's just for the case that the enduser's has any previous cookies, but decided to disable the "remember me" later on. And no, uuid is inappropriate here since it doesn't exist in the table. Just delete all entries associated with user ID. – BalusC Feb 24 '11 at 17:38
  • 3
    @Marcio: cookies can be stolen, exposed or tampered by various means, either accidently or awarely. You should never store sensitive user-specific information like username and password in cookies. An UUID just ensures an unique and unguessable value which is at its own worthless information. – BalusC Apr 13 '12 at 18:33
  • 2
    I'm really sorry to restart this old discussion, but i have one question @BalusC: do you store the password in clear text in the user object? (It seems you must, as you call login(...user.getPassword()); How is this represented in your persistance? – bmurauer Jul 19 '13 at 12:05
  • 3
    If you combine @BalusC's answers for a lot of questions, it'll become a book to must have on your shelf, surely. – Swapnil Aug 25 '14 at 5:41

Normally this is done like this:

When you log in a user you also set a cookie on the client ( and store the cookie value in the database ) expiring after a certain time (1-2 weeks usually).

When a new request comes in you check that the certain cookie exists and if so look into the database to see if it matches a certain account. If it matches you will then "loosely" log in that account. When i say loosely i mean you only let that session read some info and not write information. You will need to request the password in order to allow the write options.

This is all that is. The trick is to make sure that a "loosely" login is not able to do a lot of harm to the client. This will somewhat protect the user from someone who grabs his remember me cookie and tries to log in as him.

  • 6
    +1 for the 'loose' login hint. – asgs Apr 29 '11 at 20:22
  • 1
    I like this loose login as well. You are authenticated but not yet authorized. – Bill Rosmus Aug 14 '12 at 6:24

You cannot login a user completely via HttpServletRequest.login(username, password) since you shouldn't keep both username and plain text password in the database. Also you cannot perform this login with a password hash which is saved in the database. However, you need to identify a user with a cookie/DB token but log him/her in without entering password using custom login module (Java class) based on Glassfish server API.

See the following links for more details:

http://www.lucubratory.eu/custom-jaas-realm-for-glassfish-3/

Custom Security mechanism in Java EE 6/7 application

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