2

One error that I often see is a container being cleared whilst iterating through it. I have attempted to put together a small example program demonstrating this happening. One thing to note is that this can often happen many function calls deep so is quite hard to detect.

Note: This example deliberately shows some poorly designed code. I am trying to find a solution to detect the errors caused by writing code such as this without having to meticulously examine an entire codebase (~500 C++ units)

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

class Bomb;

std::vector<Bomb> bombs;

class Bomb
{
  std::string name;

public:
  Bomb(std::string name)
  {
    this->name = name;
  }

  void touch()
  {
    if(rand() % 100 > 30)
    {
      /* Simulate everything being exploded! */
      bombs.clear();

      /* An error: "this" is no longer valid */
      std::cout << "Crickey! The bomb was set off by " << name << std::endl;
    }
  }
};

int main()
{
  bombs.push_back(Bomb("Freddy"));
  bombs.push_back(Bomb("Charlie"));
  bombs.push_back(Bomb("Teddy"));
  bombs.push_back(Bomb("Trudy"));

  for(size_t i = 0; i < bombs.size(); i++)
  {
    bombs.at(i).touch();
  }

  return 0;
}

Can anyone suggest a way of guaranteeing this cannot happen? The only way I can currently detect this kind of thing is replacing the global new and delete with mmap / mprotect and detecting use after free memory accesses. This and Valgrind however sometimes fail to pick it up if the vector does not need to reallocate (i.e only some elements removed or the new size is not yet the reserve size). Ideally I don't want to have to clone much of the STL to make a version of std::vector that always reallocates every insertion/deletion during debug / testing.

One way that almost works is if the std::vector instead contains std::weak_ptr, then the usage of .lock() to create a temporary reference prevents its deletion whilst execution is within the classes method. However this cannot work with std::shared_ptr because you do not need lock() and same with plain objects. Creating a container of weak pointers just for this would be wasteful.

Can anyone else think of a way to protect ourselves from this.

1

In your particular example the misery boils down to no less than two design flaws:

  1. Your vector is a global variable. Limit the scope of all of your objects as much as possible and issues like this are less likely to occur.
  2. Having the single responsibility principle in mind, I can hardly imagine how one could come up with a class that needs to have some method that either directly or indirectly (maybe through 100 layers of call stack) deletes objects that could happen to be this.

I am aware that your example is artificial and intentionally bad, so please don't get me wrong here: I'm sure that in your actual case it is not so obvious how sticking to some basic design rules can prevent you from doing this. But as I said, I strongly believe that good design will reduce the likelyhood of such bugs coming up. And in fact, I cannot remember that I was ever facing such an issue, but maybe I am just not experienced enough :)

However, if this really keeps being an issue despite sticking with some design rules, then I have this idea how to detect it:

  1. Create a member int recursionDepth in your class and initialize it with 0
  2. At the beginning of each non-private method increment it.
  3. Use RAII to make sure that at the end of each method it is decremented again
  4. In the destructor check it to be 0, otherwise it means that the destructor is directly or indirectly called by some method of this.
  5. You may want to #ifdef all of this and enable it only in debug build. This would essentially make it a debug assertion, some people like them :)

Note, that this does not work in a multi threaded environment.

  • This idea has crossed my mind and if this was a C (not C++) program I would very likely be attempting it in this very way. What I am doing instead with a custom iterator (I added the code just under this answer) is actually pretty much your same idea. The reference is incremented as it is created and decremented by RAII as it goes out of scope. If the vector resizes and the reference count > 0, it will abort/log. The only place it differs is that it doesn't detect individual objects lifetimes and works on the vector as a whole. – Karsten Pedersen Jun 14 '18 at 8:54
  • I'm going to mark your solution as the answer. My iterator idea basically just makes this system an automatic process. I think the custom iterator could be made thread-safe too (apply a mutex around the inc/dec of the reference). – Karsten Pedersen Jun 14 '18 at 9:06
  • Note that it is hard to imagine anyone giving budget for such manual instrumentation of all classes in a semi-decent code base. – Öö Tiib Jun 14 '18 at 13:46
3

Easiest way is to run your unit tests with Clang MemorySanitizer linked in. Let some continuous-integration Linux box to do it automatically on each push into repo.

MemorySanitizer has "Use-after-destruction detection" (flag -fsanitize-memory-use-after-dtor + environment variable MSAN_OPTIONS=poison_in_dtor=1) and so it will blow the test up that executes the code and that turns your continuous-integration red.

If you have neither unit tests nor continuous integration in place then you can also just manually debug your code with MemorySanitizer but that is hard way compared with the easiest. So better start to use continuous integration and write unit tests.

Note that there may be legitimate reasons of memory reads and writes after destructor has been ran but memory hasn't yet been freed. For example std::variant<std::string,double>. It lets us to assign it std::string then double and so its implementation might destroy the string and reuse same storage for double. Filtering such cases out is unfortunately manual work at the moment, but tools evolve.

  • MemorySanitizer has some of the same issues as mudflap, ElectricFence and Valgrind in that it will not pick up this kind of invalid C++ because as far as memory and C goes, if you erase an element in a std::vector, it will not resize / realloc so the memory behind the std::vector has not been free'd so as far as these tools is concerned, it is not a use after free. I need something more mechanical using some of the functionality of RAII. – Karsten Pedersen Jun 13 '18 at 22:36
  • 1
    When you erase element of vector then its destructor is ran and so the object is poisoned by MemorySanitizer and so the issue you described is caught. May be you did not use Clang option -fsanitize-memory-use-after-dtor or you did not set environment variable MSAN_OPTIONS=poison_in_dtor=1 before running the program. – Öö Tiib Jun 14 '18 at 7:24
  • -fsanitize-memory-use-after-dtor looks like a very useful feature. I am not in the position to switch to clang from gcc just yet but I will keep that one in mind. I am assuming that if the memory is poisoned but then reallocated later on by the runtime, this still wont trigger an error? It looks mostly robust though. – Karsten Pedersen Jun 14 '18 at 8:53
  • I am usually setting tests to compile with several versions of different compilers. It may be end product is to be delivered compiled with icc but it is still useful to see during production what gcc, clang and msvc think of it. – Öö Tiib Jun 14 '18 at 13:55
  • All tools (including MemorySanitizer) may give false positives but then often something too clever is going on. If it did confuse a tool then it surely will confuse next maintainer of it as well. – Öö Tiib Jun 14 '18 at 13:59
0

In the end I went with a custom iterator that if the owner std::vector resizes whilst the iterator is still in scope, it will log an error or abort (giving me a stacktrace of the program). This example is a bit convoluted but I have tried to simplify it as much as possible and removed unused functionality from the iterator.

This system has flagged up about 50 errors of this nature. Some may be repeats. However Valgrind and ElecricFence at this point came up clean which is disappointing (In total they flagged up around 10 which I have already fixed since the start of the code cleanup).

In this example I use clear() which Valgrind does flag as an error. However in the actual codebase it is random access erases (i.e vec.erase(vec.begin() + 9)) which I need to check and Valgrind unfortunately misses quite a few.

main.cpp

#include "sstd_vector.h"

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <memory>

class Bomb;

sstd::vector<std::shared_ptr<Bomb> > bombs;

class Bomb
{
  std::string name;

public:
  Bomb(std::string name)
  {
    this->name = name;
  }

  void touch()
  {
    if(rand() % 100 > 30)
    {
      /* Simulate everything being exploded! */
      bombs.clear(); // Causes an ABORT

      std::cout << "Crickey! The bomb was set off by " << name << std::endl;
    }
  }
};

int main()
{
  bombs.push_back(std::make_shared<Bomb>("Freddy"));
  bombs.push_back(std::make_shared<Bomb>("Charlie"));
  bombs.push_back(std::make_shared<Bomb>("Teddy"));
  bombs.push_back(std::make_shared<Bomb>("Trudy"));

  /* The key part is the lifetime of the iterator. If the vector
   * changes during the lifetime of the iterator, even if it did
   * not reallocate, an error will be logged */
  for(sstd::vector<std::shared_ptr<Bomb> >::iterator it = bombs.begin(); it != bombs.end(); it++)
  {
    it->get()->touch();
  }

  return 0;
}

sstd_vector.h

#include <vector>

#include <stdlib.h>

namespace sstd
{

template <typename T>
class vector
{
  std::vector<T> data;
  size_t refs;

  void check_valid()
  {
    if(refs > 0)
    {
      /* Report an error or abort */
      abort();
    }
  }

public:
  vector() : refs(0) { }

  ~vector()
  {
    check_valid();
  }

  vector& operator=(vector const& other)
  {
    check_valid();
    data = other.data;

    return *this;
  }

  void push_back(T val)
  {
    check_valid();
    data.push_back(val);
  }

  void clear()
  {
    check_valid();
    data.clear();
  }

  class iterator
  {
    friend class vector;

    typename std::vector<T>::iterator it;
    vector<T>* parent;

    iterator() { }
    iterator& operator=(iterator const&) { abort(); }

  public:
    iterator(iterator const& other)
    {
      it = other.it;
      parent = other.parent;
      parent->refs++;
    }

    ~iterator()
    {
      parent->refs--;
    }

    bool operator !=(iterator const& other)
    {
      if(it != other.it) return true;
      if(parent != other.parent) return true;

      return false;
    }

    iterator operator ++(int val)
    {
      iterator rtn = *this;
      it ++;

      return rtn;
    }

    T* operator ->()
    {
      return &(*it);
    }

    T& operator *()
    {
      return *it;
    }
  };

  iterator begin()
  {
    iterator rtn;

    rtn.it = data.begin();
    rtn.parent = this;
    refs++;

    return rtn;
  }

  iterator end()
  {
    iterator rtn;

    rtn.it = data.end();
    rtn.parent = this;
    refs++;

    return rtn;
  }
};

}

The disadvantages of this system is that I must use an iterator rather than .at(idx) or [idx]. I personally don't mind this one so much. I can still use .begin() + idx if random access is needed.

It is a little bit slower (nothing compared to Valgrind though). When I am done, I can do a search / replace of sstd::vector with std::vector and there should be no performance drop.

  • 1
    Did you know about the debug mode of libstdc++? It is enabled by passing -D_GLIBCXX_DEBUG to the command line and adds expensive extra checking. AFAIK Visual studio perfors a few extra checks on iterators in debug mode as well. gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libstdc++/manual/debug_mode.html It would be interesting if it catches as many bugs as your implementation (it looks like it checks iterator accesses, but does not flag the clear() itself. wandbox.org/permlink/MXz9vzXMa7guktJJ – PaulR Jun 14 '18 at 14:47

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