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I have been porting my RabbitCT CUDA implementation to OpenCL and I'm running into issues with pinned memory.

For CUDA a host buffer is created that buffers the input images to be processed in pinned memory. This allows the host to catch the next batch of input images while the GPU processes the current batch. A simplified mockup of my CUDA implementation is as follows:

// globals
float** hostProjBuffer = new float*[BUFFER_SIZE];
float* devProjection[STREAMS_MAX];
cudaStream_t stream[STREAMS_MAX];

void initialize()
{
    // initiate streams
    for( uint s = 0; s < STREAMS_MAX; s++ ){
        cudaStreamCreateWithFlags (&stream[s], cudaStreamNonBlocking);
        cudaMalloc( (void**)&devProjection[s], imgSize);
    }

    // initiate buffers
    for( uint b = 0; b < BUFFER_SIZE; b++ ){
        cudaMallocHost((void **)&hostProjBuffer[b], imgSize);
    }
}

// main function called for all input images
void backproject(imgdata* r)
{
    uint projNr = r->imgnr % BUFFER_SIZE;
    uint streamNr = r->imgnr % STREAMS_MAX;

    // When buffer is filled, wait until work in current stream has finished
    if(projNr == 0) {
        cudaStreamSynchronize(stream[streamNr]);
    }       

    // copy received image data to buffer (maps double precision to float)
    std::copy(r->I_n, r->I_n+(imgSizeX * imgSizeY), hostProjBuffer[projNr]);

    // copy image and matrix to device
    cudaMemcpyAsync( devProjection[streamNr], hostProjBuffer[projNr], imgSize, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice, stream[streamNr] );

    // call kernel
    backproject<<<numBlocks, threadsPerBlock, 0 , stream[streamNr]>>>(devProjection[streamNr]);
}

So, for CUDA, I create a pinned host pointer for each buffer item and copy the data to the device before executing kernel of each stream.

For OpenCL I initially did something similar when following the Nvidia OpenCL Best Practices Guide. Here they recommend creating two buffers, one for copying the kernel data to and one for the pinned memory. However, this leads to the implementation using double the device memory as both the kernel and pinned memory buffers are allocated on the device.

To get around this memory issue, I created an implementation where only a mapping is made to the device as it is needed. This can be seen in the following implementation:

// globals
float** hostProjBuffer = new float* [BUFFER_SIZE];
cl_mem devProjection[STREAMS_MAX], devMatrix[STREAMS_MAX];
cl_command_queue queue[STREAMS_MAX];

// initiate streams
void initialize()
{
    for( uint s = 0; s < STREAMS_MAX; s++ ){
        queue[s] = clCreateCommandQueueWithProperties(context, device, NULL, &status);
        devProjection[s] = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_READ_ONLY | CL_MEM_ALLOC_HOST_PTR, imgSize, NULL, &status);
    }
}

// main function called for all input images
void backproject(imgdata* r)
{
    const uint projNr = r->imgnr % BUFFER_SIZE;
    const uint streamNr = r->imgnr % STREAMS_MAX;

    // when buffer is filled, wait until work in current stream has finished
    if(projNr == 0) {
       status = clFinish(queue[streamNr]);
    }

    // map host memory region to device buffer
    hostProjBuffer[projNr] = (float*) clEnqueueMapBuffer(queue[streamNr], devProjection[streamNr], CL_FALSE, CL_MAP_WRITE_INVALIDATE_REGION, 0, imgSize, 0, NULL, NULL, &status);

    // copy received image data to hostbuffers
    std::copy(imgPtr, imgPtr + (imgSizeX * imgSizeY), hostProjBuffer[projNr]);

    // unmap the allocated pinned host memory
    clEnqueueUnmapMemObject(queue[streamNr], devProjection[streamNr], hostProjBuffer[projNr], 0, NULL, NULL);   

    // set stream specific arguments
    clSetKernelArg(kernel, 0, sizeof(devProjection[streamNr]), (void *) &devProjection[streamNr]);

    // launch kernel
    clEnqueueNDRangeKernel(queue[streamNr], kernel, 3, NULL, global_work_size, local_work_size, 0, NULL, NULL);

    clFlush(queue[streamNr]);
    clFinish(queue[streamNr]);   //should be removed!
}

This implementation does use a similar amount of device memory as the CUDA implementation. However, I have been unable to get this last code example working without a clFinish after each loop, which significantly hampers the performance of the application. This indicates data is lost as the host moves ahead of the kernel. I tried increasing my buffer size to the number of input images, but this did not work either. So somehow during execution, the hostBuffer data gets lost.

So, with the goal to write OpenCL code similar to CUDA, I have three questions:

  1. What is the recommended implementation for OpenCL pinned memory?
  2. Is my OpenCL implementation similar to how CUDA handles pinned memory?
  3. What causes the wrong data to be used in the OpenCL example?

Thanks in advance!

Kind regards,

Remy


PS: Question initially asked at the Nvidia developer forums

  • What exactly do you mean by "hostBuffer data gets lost"? If you change the host memory before the unmap completes (it is async) then they wrong data will be written. I suggest getting a trace in Nsight and seeing if you're re-using a buffer on the CPU side before the GPU operation has finished. Also, why do you use CL_MEM_ALLOC_HOST_PTR? I don't think it is needed here since the map operation makes it host accessible. Finally, why so many command queues, if I might ask? – Dithermaster Jun 15 '18 at 22:56
  • With "hostBuffer data gets lost" I mean that the device does not receive the correct data as the output is wrong, while it is correct with the forced clFinish after each call of the main function, which should be removed. A host pointer array is used to handle the async transfers. Buffer overwriting is prevented by a clFinish before mapping. I used ALLOC_HOST_PTR because the Nvidia OCL guide told me to and it allocates host memory which I use for storing the parameter data. Finally, only 2 command queues are used but more is possible as well by a defined variable. Will try Nsight tomorrow. – Remy561 Jun 17 '18 at 9:52
  • The clEnqueueUnmapMemObject is asynchronous, which means the host memory must be maintained (not unallocated and not overwritten) until the unmap finishes. Instead of clFinish you could take an event on the unmap and then wait on that event before getting rid of the host memory. – Dithermaster Jun 17 '18 at 19:37

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