1

Just saw someone write this:

let id = 1;
...
let employee = null;

for (const e of employees) {
    if (e.id === id) {
        employee = e;
        break;
    }
}

seems like an overcomplicated way of writing this:

let id = 1;
...
let employee = employees.find(e => e.id === id);

Is there any benefit to using a loop with a break vs a find()?

What is find()'s implementation behind the curtain?

  • 1
    just a minor difference, find returns undefined instead of null, if not found. – Nina Scholz Jun 13 '18 at 18:24
  • 1
    Two questions were asked, but I suspect the first one is more interesting. As far as the implementation of find(), it is probably a highly-optimized loop in a lower-level language. – MarkHu Aug 18 '18 at 19:05
3

Perfomance

.find() is faster than for...break.

Check this link for test results. for...break is 30% slower than .find()


.find() source code can be found here

.find() is not supported in older browsers like IE11 and below. You need to use a polyfill instead.


Opinion

.find() is better due to complexity level and the internal algorithm used. Using for...break you will always doing a linear search which means n * n repetitions. The bigger the array, the slower the function.

2

Probably the same. Find is way more succinct and declarative no?

2

Tried this:

var startTime, endTime;

function start() {
  startTime = new Date();
};

function end() {
  endTime = new Date();
  var timeDiff = endTime - startTime; //in ms
  console.log(timeDiff + " milliseconds");
}

let employees = [];
for (var i = 10000; i > 0; i--){
  let thisEmployee = {
    id: i,
    name: "Person" + i
  }
  employees.push(thisEmployee);
}

let id = 1;
let employee1 = null;
start();
for (const e of employees) {
    if (e.id === id) {
        employee1 = e;
        break;
    }
}
end();
console.log("Method1: ", JSON.stringify(employee1));
start();
let employee2 = employees.find(e => e.id === id);
end();
console.log("Method2: ", JSON.stringify(employee2));

First method is much slower:

"12 milliseconds"
"Method1: "
"{\"id\":1,\"name\":\"Person1\"}"
"0 milliseconds"
"Method2: "
"{\"id\":1,\"name\":\"Person1\"}"
2

I implemented both approaches as two methods with the same signature (forBreakMethod(x) and findMethod (x)) and passed them through a simple performance test spec.

(() => {

const test = (DATA_LENGTH = 1000, INDEX = 9, TESTS_COUNT = 10000) => {
  // data initialization
  const employees = [];
  for (let i = 1; i <= DATA_LENGTH; i++){
    employees.push({ id: i });
  }
  
  // methods initialization
  const forBreakMethod = (x) => {
    const length = employees.length;
    for (let i = 0; i < length; i++) {
      if (x === employees.id) {
        return employees[i];
      }
    }
  }
  const findMethod = (x) => {
    return employees.find(item => x === item.id);
  }
  
  // for-break test
  const time1 = performance.now();
  for (let i = 0; i < TESTS_COUNT; i++) {
    forBreakMethod(INDEX);
  }
  const time2 = performance.now();
  console.log(`[for-break] find ${INDEX} from ${DATA_LENGTH}: ${time2 - time1}`);
  
  // find test
  const time3 = performance.now();
  for (let i = 0; i < TESTS_COUNT; i++) {
    findMethod(INDEX);
  }
  const time4 = performance.now();
  console.log(`[Array.find] find ${INDEX} from ${DATA_LENGTH}: ${time4 - time3}`);

  console.log('---------------');
};

test(10, 1, 1000000);
test(10, 5, 1000000);
test(10, 9, 1000000);
console.log('\n');
test(100, 10, 100000);
test(100, 50, 100000);
test(100, 99, 100000);
console.log('\n');
test(1000, 10, 10000);
test(1000, 500, 10000);
test(1000, 999, 10000);
console.log('\n');
test(10000, 10, 10000);
test(10000, 5000, 10000);
test(10000, 9999, 10000);

})();

A conclusion I see is that the Array.find approach has an advantage if the item we want to find lives in the left part of the data array, but its performance getting low when the result index goes to the right. The for-break approach seems more stable, since its performance does not depend on the index we want to find, but its cost is significant.

So very rough, I would say that the Array.find approach could be considered as more performant if we are going to walk through the first half of the data array, otherwise I would use the for-break approach.

PS Chrome, Safari, Firefox, 2018.

1

It is fairly obvious that the native find() function is faster than a loop algorithm. But the OP asked "Is there any benefit to using a loop...?" A theoretical reason someone might want to loop is if they needed to process non-matching elements along the way.

0

So I just tried this:

const array = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,];

for (const i of array) {
  console.log(i);
  if (i === 3)
    break;
}

array.find(i => {
  console.log(i);
  return i === 3;
});

Both of them output

0
1
2
3

So, they both short circuit on the first answer they find as I would expect, but as for specific performance I can't say for certain whether one is better than the other. I imagine the performance would be comparable if not identical.
The one big difference that stands out to me is that find returns the value, but the for loop you have to handle the value in the loop, otherwise assign it to a variable to use later. A minor detail but it could potentially make find much more readable for someone else looking at your code.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.