147

Also, is this a style question or a functional question? Is it a matter of preference or is one better? I'm trying to understand the purpose of for-of.

Usually I use,

let iterable = [10, 20, 30];

iterable.forEach((val) => {
   console.log(val);
})

But I see that this new syntax is available.

let iterable = [10, 20, 30];
    
for (let value of iterable) {
   console.log(value);
}

Can one provide an example of a best use case for for-of that might illuminate when one should use it?

4
  • I would not say this is entirely opinion based, since there are definitely some differences between forEach and for/of. For example, for/of can be used to iterate over a generator, where forEach cannot. So it is not merely a matter of preference.
    – CRice
    Jun 13, 2018 at 18:42
  • Some iterables don't have a forEach() like a FileList for example. Other than iterables that don't implement forEach(), it's purely a matter of preference. Jun 13, 2018 at 18:43
  • If you don't want to mutate value, you could and should write const value of iterable
    – makkabi
    May 8, 2022 at 0:20
  • I think nowadays the question is why one would ever prefer forEach over for..of. The only practical advantage worth noting (that I can think of) is support for older browsers without transpilation. Aug 3, 2022 at 16:09

2 Answers 2

182

I recommend to always use for … of in ES6.

  • It works on any iterable
  • It supports all kinds of control flow in the loop body, like continue, break, return, yield and await.

Also I personally find it more readable, but that comes down to preference. Some people think forEach is a more functional style, but that's wrong - it has no result value and is all about doing side effects, so an imperative-looking loop fits that purpose better.

Performance is not a concern, in modern engines all loop styles are equivalent.

8
  • 1
    await can actually be used within a forEach loop and I'd argue it is actually easier. With for-of you have to wrap the whole thing in an async function. With forEach you can just make the callback async: [1,2,3].forEach(async (value) => {await new Promise(resolve=>console.log(value))})
    – Forivin
    Jan 20, 2019 at 13:18
  • 43
    @Forivin That doesn't work, the loop will not be waited for. Your code is equivalent to just creating the promise and not using async/await at all.
    – Bergi
    Jan 20, 2019 at 13:21
  • Well, it does work, the use-case is just different and admittedly unusual. But the promise executors will be in fact be called.
    – Forivin
    Jan 20, 2019 at 14:08
  • 22
    Well for the different use case you don't need await at all, and so you could just write for (const value of [1,2,3]) { new Promise(resolve => console.log(value)); }
    – Bergi
    Jan 20, 2019 at 14:11
  • 1
    @Forivin You can do it using Array methods with Promise.all as long as you return an Array - so just use map instead of forEach as in: await Promise.all([1, 2, 3].map(async value => { const result = await foo(value); })) this would await each async handler without having to use for..of. Mar 27, 2023 at 16:03
70

This is a very interesting question which has been discussed in many other sites. I'll post the basics of what I have read.

ForEach exclusively belong to the royal family of Arrays. The forEach method was introduced with lineage to the prototypal inheritance of Array object! Needless to say, the forEach clause works only with those data structure which are Arrays. The method basically iterates over the elements of the array and executes a callback function [basically some executable function/ fun activity].


The for-of loop is adequately new to the JS world and packs in super-powers! Voilaaaaaaa! The for-of loop creates a loop iterating over iterable member objects. The list is an extensive one such as

  • Array
  • Map
  • Set
  • String
  • TypedArray
  • Other W3C classes

You need to know that this bad-ass boy emerged with the birth of ES6 in 2015. So, it offers plenty of flexibility in usage


Performance

In performance, for...of is faster than forEach. Results can be found here

forEach is 24% slower than for...of


Update

There are several other iterable classes in the W3C specification, like FileList, as I mentioned above. And in recent drafts of W3C (around when ES6 was released), collections like HTMLCollection and NodeList now implement forEach() as well, not just Array anymore. By @Patrick Roberts


Source Links:

6
  • 4
    That list only mentions classes in the ECMAScript specification. There are several other iterable classes in the W3C specification, like FileList, as I mentioned above. And in recent drafts of W3C (around when ES6 was released), collections like HTMLCollection and NodeList now implement forEach() as well, not just Array anymore. Jun 13, 2018 at 18:46
  • 6
    In latest firefox, forEach is faster than for of, but in chrome, for of is faster.
    – Sphinx
    Jun 13, 2018 at 19:04
  • 2
    Unless there's a fundamental reason why some constructs are much harder to optimize for, these kinds of benchmark comparisons are <extremely> brittle. For example, on the most recent v8 version 10.4.123.20 I'm finding that for...of, for, and forEach basically have the same performance.
    – Meow
    Aug 9, 2022 at 17:29
  • 1
    You had me at "super-powers!" "Voilaaaaaaa" and "bad-ass." Sep 25, 2022 at 16:03
  • 1
    "In performance, for...of is faster than forEach" Never make such general statements. Performace depends on so many factors and mostly is irrelevant when your code doesn't do what it is suposed to do or when it's impossible to maintain because of over-optimzation. Apr 24, 2023 at 8:19