I wanted a display a geom_smooth with a natural log and this code works fine:

    df <- iris
iris_logplot <- ggplot(df, aes(Sepal.Length, Sepal.Width, colour = Species))

iris_logplot + stat_summary(fun.y =median, geom = "point") + stat_summary(fun.data = mean_cl_boot, aes(group = Species), geom = "errorbar", width = 0.2) + 
  geom_smooth(method="lm", formula=y~log(x)) 

now I want to display a geom_smooth with a log whose base is 2 and I apply this code:

df <- iris
iris_logplot <- ggplot(df, aes(Sepal.Length, Sepal.Width, colour = Species))

iris_logplot + stat_summary(fun.y =median, geom = "point") +
  stat_summary(fun.data = mean_cl_boot, aes(group = Species), geom = "errorbar", width = 0.2) + geom_smooth(method="lm", formula=y~log2(x)) 

Why the plots are the same?

Thanks

  • 3
    What does this copy of iris look like? It seems like you've changed the column names to lowercase and replaced the periods with underscores—this is fine, but let us know—but you've got color assigned to iris in your aes. Should this actually be species? Similarly, you later refer to a column Type. Please post the data you're working with – camille Jun 13 at 19:25
  • I just tried to make a reproducible example. The real database I'm working with, contains other variables. The focus here is why when typing log2 or log there is no difference? – Gianluca Jun 13 at 19:36
  • So now I've posted exactly the code i'm using. Thanks for the suggestion (I'm sure there will be some other guy that would complain about this) – Gianluca Jun 13 at 19:46
  • 2
    Wait, but now there's no data for us to work with! Using a modified version of the iris dataset was fine, you just need to be clear about what's changed in it from the standard version, e.g. what the iris and Type columns are. Or you can post a sample of your real data – camille Jun 13 at 19:53
  • 1
    From a model-fit perspective, the base of the logarithm doesn't matter. When you change from log_e to log_2, the resulting fit should be the same. since log_2(x) = log_e(x) / log_e(2) it is just multiplying by a constant. – Gregor Jun 13 at 20:09
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The lines are the same because multiplying a feature in a linear model by a constant does not change the fit, the coefficients are just divided by the same constant. The "change of base" formula tells us that log_b(x) = log_a(x) / log_a(b).

We can verify this by examining the models:

m_log_e = lm(Sepal.Width ~ log(Sepal.Length) * Species, data = iris)
m_log_2 = lm(Sepal.Width ~ log2(Sepal.Length) * Species, data = iris)

summary(m_log_e)
# Call:
# lm(formula = Sepal.Width ~ log(Sepal.Length) * Species, data = iris)
# 
# Residuals:
#      Min       1Q   Median       3Q      Max 
# -0.71398 -0.15310 -0.00419  0.16595  0.60237 
# 
# Coefficients:
#                                     Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept)                          -2.9663     0.8872  -3.343 0.001055 ** 
# log(Sepal.Length)                     3.9760     0.5512   7.214 2.86e-11 ***
# Speciesversicolor                     2.3355     1.1899   1.963 0.051595 .  
# Speciesvirginica                      3.0464     1.1639   2.617 0.009807 ** 
# log(Sepal.Length):Speciesversicolor  -2.0626     0.7087  -2.910 0.004186 ** 
# log(Sepal.Length):Speciesvirginica   -2.4373     0.6811  -3.579 0.000471 ***
# ---
# Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1
# 
# Residual standard error: 0.272 on 144 degrees of freedom
# Multiple R-squared:  0.6237,  Adjusted R-squared:  0.6106 
# F-statistic: 47.73 on 5 and 144 DF,  p-value: < 2.2e-16

summary(m_log_2)
# Call:
# lm(formula = Sepal.Width ~ log2(Sepal.Length) * Species, data = iris)
# 
# Residuals:
#      Min       1Q   Median       3Q      Max 
# -0.71398 -0.15310 -0.00419  0.16595  0.60237 
# 
# Coefficients:
#                                      Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept)                           -2.9663     0.8872  -3.343 0.001055 ** 
# log2(Sepal.Length)                     2.7560     0.3820   7.214 2.86e-11 ***
# Speciesversicolor                      2.3355     1.1899   1.963 0.051595 .  
# Speciesvirginica                       3.0464     1.1639   2.617 0.009807 ** 
# log2(Sepal.Length):Speciesversicolor  -1.4297     0.4913  -2.910 0.004186 ** 
# log2(Sepal.Length):Speciesvirginica   -1.6894     0.4721  -3.579 0.000471 ***
# ---
# Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1
# 
# Residual standard error: 0.272 on 144 degrees of freedom
# Multiple R-squared:  0.6237,  Adjusted R-squared:  0.6106 
# F-statistic: 47.73 on 5 and 144 DF,  p-value: < 2.2e-16

Comparing the summaries, you can convince yourself that the fits are the same - the residuals are the same, the statistics are the same, the intercepts are the same, the only difference are the coefficients for terms including Sepal.Length. We can divide the coefficients:

coef(m_log_e) / coef(m_log_2)
#                         (Intercept)                   log(Sepal.Length)                   Speciesversicolor                    Speciesvirginica 
#                            1.000000                            1.442695                            1.000000                            1.000000 
# log(Sepal.Length):Speciesversicolor  log(Sepal.Length):Speciesvirginica 
#                            1.442695                            1.442695 

And see that the terms involving Sepal.Length are off by a fixed ratio. And what is that ratio?

1 / log(2)
# [1] 1.442695

It is 1 /log(2), because of the change of base formula referenced at the start of this answer.

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