2

I've got 3 file:

FILE 1

NODE_2020   Cancer
NODE_2029   Thug
NODE_0902   Snap

FILE 2

NODE_2020   Mikro   
NODE_2029   Bold
NODE_0902   Mini

FILE 3

NODE_2020   Gold
NODE_2080   Damn
NODE_0900   Gueo

I need to search for the first column of file 1 into the other two: if value matches, then column 2 of file 2 and column 2 of file 3 will be printed into a single file; if not, a "NO MATCH" string will be printed in return. Output file will be made like this:

Query   File1   File2   File3

NODE_2020   Cancer  Mikro   Gold    
NODE_2029   Thug    Bold    NO MATCH    
NODE_0902   Snap    Mini    NO MATCH

Awk/sed/perl solutions are really appreciated. What I'm stuck on doing is to use first column of file 1 as a variable to look with just an if statement into other 2 files.

Here's what I've tried, to use column from file 1 and match into file 2:

awk 'NR==FNR{a[NR]=$1;next} { print a[FNR],"\t", $2 }' file1 file2

It actually works for 2 files. No idea on how to extend to three file, and to add the "NO MATCH" pattern.

  • Please don't downvote just for 7 mins. Give me a reasonable time to post what you've asked. – Shred Jun 14 '18 at 10:21
  • Why don't you use one of the solutions in the duplicates you mention? – Chris Turner Jun 14 '18 at 10:40
  • Because I'm unable to find a way to add an if statement in awk to print the "NO MATCH" item, and to extend this comparison to three files. That's mainly because awk answers are usually just the code, with absolutely none description. – Shred Jun 14 '18 at 10:47
  • 1
    awk answers are often just code because they're usually clear, simple, and trivial to understand given a glance at the documentation. – Ed Morton Jun 14 '18 at 10:56
3

With GNU awk for true multi-dimensional arrays and ARGIND:

$ cat tst.awk
BEGIN { OFS="\t" }
(NR==FNR) || ($1 in vals) {
    vals[$1][ARGIND] = $2
}
END {
    printf "%s%s", "Query", OFS
    for (fileNr=1; fileNr<=ARGIND; fileNr++) {
        printf "%s%s", ARGV[fileNr], (fileNr<ARGIND ? OFS : ORS)
    }
    for (key in vals) {
        printf "%s%s", key, OFS
        for (fileNr=1; fileNr<=ARGIND; fileNr++) {
            val = (fileNr in vals[key] ? vals[key][fileNr] : "NO MATCH")
            printf "%s%s", val, (fileNr<ARGIND ? OFS : ORS)
        }
    }
}

$ awk -f tst.awk file1 file2 file3
Query   file1   file2   file3
NODE_2020       Cancer  Mikro   Gold
NODE_0902       Snap    Mini    NO MATCH
NODE_2029       Thug    Bold    NO MATCH
  • Thanks for the answer. Could you please explain what is vals , ARGIND ? – Shred Jun 14 '18 at 10:59
  • 1
    Works like a charm. Thanks a lot – Shred Jun 14 '18 at 11:19
  • You're welcome. vals is an array of the input values analogous to a in your code, ARGIND is clearly defined in the documentation as the current input file number, see gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/gawk.html. The difference between this answer and @anubhava's btw is that this will work for any number of input files instead of just 3 and uses the file names as the column headers instead of hard-coding them. To learn awk I highly recommend you get the book Effective Awk Programming, 4th Edition, by Arnold Robbins. – Ed Morton Jun 14 '18 at 11:29
2

You may use this awk:

awk -v OFS='\t' 'function bval(p,q) {
    return ((p,q) in b ? b[p,q] : "NO MATCH")
}
FNR == NR {
   a[$1] = $2
   next
}
{
   b[FILENAME,$1] = $2
}
END {
   print "Query", ARGV[1], ARGV[2], ARGV[3]
   for (i in a)
      print i, a[i], bval(ARGV[2],i), bval(ARGV[3],i)
}' file{1,2,3}

Query   file1   file2   file3
NODE_2020   Cancer  Mikro   Gold
NODE_0902   Snap    Mini    NO MATCH
NODE_2029   Thug    Bold    NO MATCH
  • 1
    Yes you're right because ARGIND is printed null. However I have edited this awk to get rid of ARGIND to make it work on BSD or any other older awk. – anubhava Jun 14 '18 at 11:46

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