467

How do you do jQuery’s hasClass with plain ol’ JavaScript? For example,

<body class="foo thatClass bar">

What’s the JavaScript way to ask if <body> has thatClass?

2
  • I suppose you would have to parse the class property (which in case of multiple classes will have multiple class names in random order separated by a space) and check whether your class name is in it. Not terribly difficult, but still terribly inconvenient if not for learning purposes :)
    – Pekka
    Feb 23, 2011 at 0:06
  • 13
    don't know if I'm late for the party but a good site that gives alternatives to jQuery functions is youmightnotneedjquery.com
    – ithil
    Jun 26, 2014 at 7:59

14 Answers 14

1472

Simply use classList.contains():

if (document.body.classList.contains('thatClass')) {
    // do some stuff
}

Other uses of classList:

document.body.classList.add('thisClass');
// $('body').addClass('thisClass');

document.body.classList.remove('thatClass');
// $('body').removeClass('thatClass');

document.body.classList.toggle('anotherClass');
// $('body').toggleClass('anotherClass');

Browser Support:

  • Chrome 8.0
  • Firefox 3.6
  • IE 10
  • Opera 11.50
  • Safari 5.1

classList Browser Support

5
  • 5
    This is unsupported in IE8. IE8 can retrieve .classList as a string, but it will not recognise the more modern methods such as .classList.contains()
    – iono
    Sep 10, 2013 at 4:14
  • 7
    @iono In the Element.classList implementation description from the MDN there is a shim that extend the support to this behavior to IE8 developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Element/classList
    – James
    Mar 17, 2015 at 18:23
  • 4
    I agree with @AlexanderWigmore, this was incredibly helpful and simple. Aug 7, 2018 at 9:58
  • 12
    This should be the acceptable answer since 2020. As no one talk about IE8 / WinXP anymore. Aug 25, 2020 at 10:12
  • 12
    Agree. .. IE8 is dead. IE in general is dead. This should be the way moving forward. Aug 28, 2020 at 4:30
118

You can check whether element.className matches /\bthatClass\b/.
\b matches a word break.

Or, you can use jQuery's own implementation:

var className = " " + selector + " ";
if ( (" " + element.className + " ").replace(/[\n\t]/g, " ").indexOf(" thatClass ") > -1 ) 

To answer your more general question, you can look at jQuery's source code on github or at the source for hasClass specifically in this source viewer.

7
  • 6
    +1 for jQuery implementation (of for having looked up (is this proper English?) what rclass actually is ;)) Feb 23, 2011 at 0:15
  • 7
    Wouldn't \b match "thatClass-anotherClass"? Feb 23, 2011 at 1:00
  • 4
    just for completeness: rclass in recent versions is "/[\n\t\r]/g" (\r added) Jan 16, 2013 at 13:32
  • 5
    @FelixSchwarz is right, in current jQuery the regexp was updated to /[\t\r\n\f]/g. Also it's good to mention that /\bclass\b/ can fail for classnames with - minus sign (other than that it works good) , that's why jQuery's implementation is better and more reliable. For example: /\bbig\b/.test('big-text') returns true instead of expected false.
    – Stano
    Jun 18, 2013 at 18:43
  • How did this discussion turn into jQuery when the original question was asking for a non-jQuery implementation? Jul 6, 2020 at 16:02
36

The most effective one liner that

  • returns a boolean (as opposed to Orbling's answer)
  • Does not return a false positive when searching for thisClass on an element that has class="thisClass-suffix".
  • is compatible with every browser down to at least IE6

function hasClass( target, className ) {
    return new RegExp('(\\s|^)' + className + '(\\s|$)').test(target.className);
}
33

// 1. Use if for see that classes:

if (document.querySelector(".section-name").classList.contains("section-filter")) {
  alert("Grid section");
  // code...
}
<!--2. Add a class in the .html:-->

<div class="section-name section-filter">...</div>

4
  • 6
    @greg_diesel: do not discourage answers! New solutions for common problems are more than welcome.
    – raveren
    Mar 10, 2015 at 8:08
  • 2
    @Raveren while new solutions to old problems are welcomed, this particular answer brings nothing new. It only adds noise to this question. Nov 3, 2016 at 21:46
  • 1
    @raveren This isn't a new solution, it's the same as this answer but with less information.
    – anon
    May 19, 2018 at 22:57
  • new solution = not noise... this new solution = perfect answer for me... this is why "do not discourage new solutions" comment was made...
    – aequalsb
    Apr 1, 2022 at 9:58
32

The attribute that stores the classes in use is className.

So you can say:

if (document.body.className.match(/\bmyclass\b/)) {
    ....
}

If you want a location that shows you how jQuery does everything, I would suggest:

http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.5.js

4
  • 1
    Excellent. The match attribute comes handy again! Does really jQuery does something more than is possible in JavaScript?! If not, jQuery is just an unnecessary weight of shorthands.
    – animaacija
    Jan 4, 2015 at 21:35
  • 1
    This also matches myclass-something, as \b matches hyphen. Jun 4, 2015 at 22:20
  • 1
    @animaacija All javascript libraries/plugins are basically javascript shorthands because they are build with javascript. Thing is: Shorthands are always necessary. Never reinvent the wheel. Jul 14, 2016 at 9:06
  • 1
    I think classList.contains('className') is a better solution than this. Avoid the generalizations Edwin. You should stop using so much words such as "always" and "never"
    – wlf
    Aug 21, 2021 at 11:56
21

Element.matches()

Instead of $(element).hasClass('example') in jQuery, you can use element.matches('.example') in plain JavaScript:

if (element.matches('.example')) {
  // Element has example class ...
}

View Browser Compatibility

3
13

hasClass function:

HTMLElement.prototype.hasClass = function(cls) {
    var i;
    var classes = this.className.split(" ");
    for(i = 0; i < classes.length; i++) {
        if(classes[i] == cls) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
};

addClass function:

HTMLElement.prototype.addClass = function(add) {
    if (!this.hasClass(add)){
        this.className = (this.className + " " + add).trim();
    }
};

removeClass function:

HTMLElement.prototype.removeClass = function(remove) {
    var newClassName = "";
    var i;
    var classes = this.className.replace(/\s{2,}/g, ' ').split(" ");
    for(i = 0; i < classes.length; i++) {
        if(classes[i] !== remove) {
            newClassName += classes[i] + " ";
        }
    }
    this.className = newClassName.trim();
};
11

I use a simple/minimal solution, one line, cross browser, and works with legacy browsers as well:

/\bmyClass/.test(document.body.className) // notice the \b command for whole word 'myClass'

This method is great because does not require polyfills and if you use them for classList it's much better in terms of performance. At least for me.

Update: I made a tiny polyfill that's an all round solution I use now:

function hasClass(element,testClass){
  if ('classList' in element) { return element.classList.contains(testClass);
} else { return new Regexp(testClass).exec(element.className); } // this is better

//} else { return el.className.indexOf(testClass) != -1; } // this is faster but requires indexOf() polyfill
  return false;
}

For the other class manipulation, see the complete file here.

7
  • 2
    Will this trip over a class of notmyClassHere?
    – Teepeemm
    Oct 4, 2015 at 0:00
  • 2
    You can also ask if your class isn't there as well !/myClass/.test(document.body.className) notice the ! symbol.
    – thednp
    Oct 4, 2015 at 0:56
  • 1
    I'm not talking about negating the question. I'm thinking that your function will improperly return true if the class name is thisIsmyClassHere.
    – Teepeemm
    Oct 4, 2015 at 2:48
  • 1
    I was only guessing that's what you ask about, didn't understand exactly what you need, but have you tried it and it failed returning true/false as it should?
    – thednp
    Oct 4, 2015 at 17:51
  • 2
    This is not perfect as it is not substrings proof. E.g. when document.body.className = 'myClass123', then /myClass/.test(document.body.className) return true...
    – Chris W
    Mar 10, 2016 at 19:50
9

a good solution for this is to work with classList and contains.

i did it like this:

... for ( var i = 0; i < container.length; i++ ) {
        if ( container[i].classList.contains('half_width') ) { ...

So you need your element and check the list of the classes. If one of the classes is the same as the one you search for it will return true if not it will return false!

9

This 'hasClass' function works in IE8+, FireFox and Chrome:

hasClass = function(el, cls) {
    var regexp = new RegExp('(\\s|^)' + cls + '(\\s|$)'),
        target = (typeof el.className === 'undefined') ? window.event.srcElement : el;
    return target.className.match(regexp);
}

[Updated Jan'2021] A better way:

hasClass = (el, cls) => {
  [...el.classList].includes(cls); //cls without dot
};
3
  • 1
    Better: [...el.classList].includes(cls); //cls without dot
    – manufosela
    Jan 5, 2021 at 12:14
  • I think you meant [...el.classList].contains(cls); for the 2021 update, right?
    – steps
    Apr 3, 2021 at 10:08
  • 2
    Node.contains is used for childnodes. With [... ] it converts the DOMTokenList into an Array of the node's classes. To search into an array I use includes
    – manufosela
    Apr 4, 2021 at 19:46
6

Use something like:

Array.prototype.indexOf.call(myHTMLSelector.classList, 'the-class');
3
  • 3
    Isn't this equivalent to myHTMLSelector.classList.indexOf('the-class')? Don't you also want >=0 at the end?
    – Teepeemm
    Oct 3, 2015 at 23:58
  • 5
    What's the point of using [].indexOf if classList has a contains method?
    – Oriol
    Jun 12, 2016 at 17:19
  • @Teepeemm no. myHTMLSelector.classList.indexOf('the-class') returns the error that myHTMLSelector.classList.indexOf is not a function because myHTMLSelector.classList is not an array. But I guess when calling it using Array.prototype some conversion happens. This may support older browser, though contains has very good support.
    – Ehsan88
    Mar 6, 2020 at 10:28
6
if (document.body.className.split(/\s+/).indexOf("thatClass") !== -1) {
    // has "thatClass"
}
1

Well all of the above answers are pretty good but here is a small simple function I whipped up. It works pretty well.

function hasClass(el, cn){
    var classes = el.classList;
    for(var j = 0; j < classes.length; j++){
        if(classes[j] == cn){
            return true;
        }
    }
}
1
  • 3
    What's the point of iterating if classList has a contains method?
    – Oriol
    Jun 12, 2016 at 17:20
1

What do you think about this approach?

<body class="thatClass anotherClass"> </body>

var bodyClasses = document.querySelector('body').className;
var myClass = new RegExp("thatClass");
var trueOrFalse = myClass.test( bodyClasses );

https://jsfiddle.net/5sv30bhe/

1
  • 2
    I think you're mixing your variable names (active===myClass?). But won't this approach give a false positive for class="nothatClassIsnt"?
    – Teepeemm
    Oct 3, 2015 at 23:59

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